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Masquerade. Remembrance of the Future. Alexandrinsky Theatre presents

Masquerade. Remembrance of the Future. Alexandrinsky Theatre presents

Valery Fokin"s performance based on Mikhail Lermontov"s drama Masquerade and the 1917 performance by Vsevolod Meyerhold
Alexandrinsky Theatre presents

The Main Stage

Masquerade. Remembrance of the Future. Alexandrinsky Theatre presents

Masquerade. Remembrance of the Future. Alexandrinsky Theatre presents

Valery Fokin"s performance based on Mikhail Lermontov"s drama Masquerade and the 1917 performance by Vsevolod Meyerhold
Alexandrinsky Theatre presents

The Main Stage

Boris Godunov (Opera by Modest Mussorgsky)

Boris Godunov (Opera by Modest Mussorgsky)

Opera in four acts.
Libretto by Modest Mussorgsky, based on Alexander Pushkin"s play of the same name.
Version and orchestration by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov.
Orchestration of "At St. Basil Cathedral" scene by Mikhail Ippolitov-Ivanov.
1948 production
Music Director: Nikolai Golovanov.
Stage Director: Leonid Baratov.
Designer: Fyodor Fedorovsky.
Choreographer: Leonid Lavrovsky.
2011 revival
Conductors: Vassily Sinaisky, Pavel Sorokin.
Director: Igor Ushakov.
Designer of scenery revival: Alyona Pikalova.
Designer of costumes revival: Elena Zaytseva.
Choreography revival: Ekaterina Mironova.
Lighting Designer: Sergei Shevchenko.
Chorus Master: Valery Borisov.
Premiered on October 16, 1948.
Sung in Russian.
Presented with three intervals.
Running time: 4 hours 07 minutes.

SYNOPSIS

Prologue
Scene 1

A crowd throngs by the high walls of the Novodevichy Monastery in Moscow. The boyar, Boris Godunov, has withdrawn to the monastery after the death of Tsar Fyodor, who did not leave an heir. That Boris will be elected to the throne is a foregone conclu sion, but he makes a show of refusing the crown so that he is not suspected of wishing to seize power. At the order of a police offi cer, the people beg Godunov to accept election to the throne:
"Do not abandon us, Father,
Do not leave us helpness!"
But Shchelkalov, secretary of the Duma, announces that Boris is implacable.

Scene 2
Square in front of the Cathedral of the As sumption in the Kremlin. A majestic pealing of bells - Boris has given his consent and is being crowned. But Tsar Boris is not happy, he is weighed down by anxiety:
"My soul is heavy,
Some instinctive fear
With ominous foreboding
Rivets my heart..."
In the Kremlin the bells are pealing and the people break out again into acclamation.

Act I
Scene 1

Late at night. A cell in the Chudov Monaste ry. By the light of an icon-lamp, the wise monk Pimen is writing a truthful chronicle of the history of the Russian state. In his chronicle, Pimen reveals the secret of the murder, by Boris Godunov, of Tsarevitch Dimitri who had stood between him and the throne. Grigory, a young novice, sharing Pimen"s cell, wakes up. He listens to the holy man"s tale and a storm of anxieties, passions and vainglorious ambitions breaks into the peace of the night. The idea comes to Grigo ry of calling himself the Tsarevitch and of doing battle with Boris for the throne.
"Boris! Boris! All tremble before you,
No one dares to remind you
Of the fate of the hapless infant...
But meanwhile a hermit in a dark cell
Is writing a terrible denunciation against you.
And you shall not escape human judgment,
As you shall not escape the judgment of heaven!"

Scene 2
An inn near the Lithuanian frontier. Three va gabond monks, Varlaam, Missail and Grigory, have dropped in on the sprightly, merry mistress of the establishment. Varlaam, a drunkard and glutton, sings a song about the capture of Kazan. Grigory, questions the mi stress of the inn on the best route to Lithuania. A police officer comes into the inn: on the Tsar"s orders he is searching for the run away monk, Grigory Otrepiev. After an un successful attempt to deflect the suspicion from himself, Grigory leaps through the win dow and makes good his escape.

Act II
Scene 3

The Tsar"s private apartment in the Kremlin. Tsarevitch Fyodor is looking at the "Book of the Big Drawing", the first map of Russia. Ksenia, Boris" daughter, is grieving before a portrait of her dead fiancй, the heir to the Danish throne. In an attempt to cheer her up, her old nurse tells her a funny story. Boris comes in and talks tenderly to his children, he is pleased to see his son gleaning wis dom from a book. But even here, with his children, Boris is tormented by anguish. Russia has been visited by a terrible famine. "Peop le affected with the plague wander about like wild animals", and the common people bla me the Tsar for all their troubles: "in the squ ares they curse the name of Boris". Some thing approaching a groan breaks out from deep down inside the Tsar:
"All around is darkness and impenetrable gloom,
O, for a fleeting glimpse of a ray of joy!..
Some secret anxiety,
One inconstantly expecting disaster!.."
The boyar, Shuisky, comes in, a cunning courtier and leader of a group of boyars with seditious intentions. He brings bad news: a pretender has raised his head in Lithuania, having taken the name of the Tsarevitch Dimi tri. He has the support of the King of Poland, the Polish nobles and the Pope. Boris requires Shuisky to tell him the truth: is he certain that the babe who was killed in the town of Uglich was the Tsarevitch Dimitri? Shuisky, enjoying the Tsar"s torment, descri bes the deep wound on the Tsarevitch"s neck, and the angelic smile on his lips...
"It seemed, that in his cradle
He was peacefully sleeping..."
Shuisky departs, having aroused with new force the fears and agitation which grip Bo ris: the latter now thinks he sees an appari tion of the murdered Dimitri.

Act III
Scene 4

A ball in the garden of Mnishek, the Governor of Sandomir. The Polish nobles are preparing to march on Moscow. They mean to place their protйgй on the Russian throne: Grigory, the runaway monk from the Chudov monaste ry, who has taken the name of the murdered Tsarevitch Dimitri. In this they will be helped by the ambitious plans of the Governor"s daugh ter, the beautiful Marina, who dreams of beco ming the wife of the future king of Russia. The long-awaited (by the Pretender) rendez vous between Marina and Dimitri who is in love with her takes place. However, Marina s abrupt and calculating speech, and her de termination, which she makes no attempt to conceal, to sit on the Russian throne discon cert the Pretender for a brief moment. Reali zing this, Marina wins him over by false pro testations of her love for him. The Jesuit, Rangoni, celebrates his victory.

Scene 5
An early winter"s morning. A square in front of the Cathedral of St. Basil the Blessed in Moscow. A crowd of starving people are discussing the Pretender s victories over the forces of Boris. A Simpleton comes running into the Square. Urchins surround him and take a kopek from him . The Tsar comes out of the Cathedral. "Bread, bread! Give the starving bread! Give us bread, father, for the sake of Christ!" cries the crowd. Goaded by the urchins, the Simple ton addresses the Tsar: "Order them to be killed, as you killed the little Tsarevitch". Boris tells the boyars not to seize the Simpleton:
"Let him be! Pray for me, simple person..."
But the Simpleton replies:
"No, Boris! It can not be done!
How can one pray for a Tsar Herod?
Our Lady does not allow it..."

Act IV
Scene 6

A clearing in the forest near Kromy. Night-time. The peasants, who are in revolt, lead in a Kromy boyar whom they have taken pris oner. They make fun of the boyar, reminding him of all their grudges:
"You trained us the right way,
In storms and bad weather, and when roads were impassable,
You exploited us,
And whipped us with a slender lash..."
The arrival of the monks, Varlaam and Missail, who denounce the sins of Boris, the regicide, stirs up the crowd s anger even more. They break out into a threatening song:
"A dashing young force is on the rampage,
The Cossack blood is all aflame!
A great subversive power has risen from the depths..."
Jesuit priests, the Pretender"s emissaries, appear. But the arrival of these foreigners arouses the crowd"s indignation. The peas ants drag the Jesuits into the forest to be hanged.
The Pretender, rides into the clearing, sur rounded by troops, Polish gentry and Jesu its. He frees the Kromy boyar. By promising his favor and protection, the Pretender per suades the peasants to march on Moscow. The sky lights up with the glow of a fire. The alarm bell is rung. The Simpleton appears, looking round him in fear. His prophetic words of the new troubles that await the Russian people are spoken in anguish and pain:
"Flow, flow, bitter tears,
Cry, cry, Russian Orthodox soul!
Soon the enemy will come and darkness will fall,
Black, impenetrable darkness..."

Scene 7
The Granovitaya Chamber, in the Kremlin. A session of the Duma is in progress. The boyars are discussing what punishment sho uld be meted out to the Pretender should he be caught. Shuisky appears. He describes the scene in the Tsar"s private apartment, when Boris drove off the apparition of the murdered Tsarevitch Dimitri. At this point, Boris comes running in, shouting: "Away, away, child!" Catching sight of the boyars, he regains his self-control and asks them for advice and help. At this, Shuisky suggests to the Tsar that he listen to a holy man who has come to tell them of a great secret. Boris ag rees. Pimen is brought in. Pimen"s tale of the miraculous cure of a sick man at the gra ve of the murdered Tsarevitch Dimitri, in Uglich, is more than Boris can take and he falls senseless to the floor. Regaining conscious ness, the dying Tsar gives his son advice on how to protect his kingdom:
"Don not trust the slander of the seditious boyars,
Keep a vigilant watch over their secret dealings with Lithuania,
Punish treason without mercy, without charity punish it,
Listen carefully to what the people say -
for their judgement is not hypocritical..."
To the pealing of the funeral bell and the chanting of a choir of monks, the Tsar dies. The shocked Tsarevitch Fyodor, having paid his last respects to his father, rises to his feet...And immediately, Shuisky who, unse en, had crept ahead of him, blocks his way to the throne.

The Main Stage

L elisir d amore. Opera Concert Performance. State Academic Symphonic Chapel of Russia presents

L elisir d amore. Opera Concert Performance. State Academic Symphonic Chapel of Russia presents

L elisir d amore
Opera Concert Performance
State Academic Symphonic Chapel of Russia presents

New Stage

Boris Godunov (Opera by Modest Mussorgsky)

Boris Godunov (Opera by Modest Mussorgsky)

Opera in four acts.
Libretto by Modest Mussorgsky, based on Alexander Pushkin"s play of the same name.
Version and orchestration by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov.
Orchestration of "At St. Basil Cathedral" scene by Mikhail Ippolitov-Ivanov.
1948 production
Music Director: Nikolai Golovanov.
Stage Director: Leonid Baratov.
Designer: Fyodor Fedorovsky.
Choreographer: Leonid Lavrovsky.
2011 revival
Conductors: Vassily Sinaisky, Pavel Sorokin.
Director: Igor Ushakov.
Designer of scenery revival: Alyona Pikalova.
Designer of costumes revival: Elena Zaytseva.
Choreography revival: Ekaterina Mironova.
Lighting Designer: Sergei Shevchenko.
Chorus Master: Valery Borisov.
Premiered on October 16, 1948.
Sung in Russian.
Presented with three intervals.
Running time: 4 hours 07 minutes.

SYNOPSIS

Prologue
Scene 1

A crowd throngs by the high walls of the Novodevichy Monastery in Moscow. The boyar, Boris Godunov, has withdrawn to the monastery after the death of Tsar Fyodor, who did not leave an heir. That Boris will be elected to the throne is a foregone conclu sion, but he makes a show of refusing the crown so that he is not suspected of wishing to seize power. At the order of a police offi cer, the people beg Godunov to accept election to the throne:
"Do not abandon us, Father,
Do not leave us helpness!"
But Shchelkalov, secretary of the Duma, announces that Boris is implacable.

Scene 2
Square in front of the Cathedral of the As sumption in the Kremlin. A majestic pealing of bells - Boris has given his consent and is being crowned. But Tsar Boris is not happy, he is weighed down by anxiety:
"My soul is heavy,
Some instinctive fear
With ominous foreboding
Rivets my heart..."
In the Kremlin the bells are pealing and the people break out again into acclamation.

Act I
Scene 1

Late at night. A cell in the Chudov Monaste ry. By the light of an icon-lamp, the wise monk Pimen is writing a truthful chronicle of the history of the Russian state. In his chronicle, Pimen reveals the secret of the murder, by Boris Godunov, of Tsarevitch Dimitri who had stood between him and the throne. Grigory, a young novice, sharing Pimen"s cell, wakes up. He listens to the holy man"s tale and a storm of anxieties, passions and vainglorious ambitions breaks into the peace of the night. The idea comes to Grigo ry of calling himself the Tsarevitch and of doing battle with Boris for the throne.
"Boris! Boris! All tremble before you,
No one dares to remind you
Of the fate of the hapless infant...
But meanwhile a hermit in a dark cell
Is writing a terrible denunciation against you.
And you shall not escape human judgment,
As you shall not escape the judgment of heaven!"

Scene 2
An inn near the Lithuanian frontier. Three va gabond monks, Varlaam, Missail and Grigory, have dropped in on the sprightly, merry mistress of the establishment. Varlaam, a drunkard and glutton, sings a song about the capture of Kazan. Grigory, questions the mi stress of the inn on the best route to Lithuania. A police officer comes into the inn: on the Tsar"s orders he is searching for the run away monk, Grigory Otrepiev. After an un successful attempt to deflect the suspicion from himself, Grigory leaps through the win dow and makes good his escape.

Act II
Scene 3

The Tsar"s private apartment in the Kremlin. Tsarevitch Fyodor is looking at the "Book of the Big Drawing", the first map of Russia. Ksenia, Boris" daughter, is grieving before a portrait of her dead fiancй, the heir to the Danish throne. In an attempt to cheer her up, her old nurse tells her a funny story. Boris comes in and talks tenderly to his children, he is pleased to see his son gleaning wis dom from a book. But even here, with his children, Boris is tormented by anguish. Russia has been visited by a terrible famine. "Peop le affected with the plague wander about like wild animals", and the common people bla me the Tsar for all their troubles: "in the squ ares they curse the name of Boris". Some thing approaching a groan breaks out from deep down inside the Tsar:
"All around is darkness and impenetrable gloom,
O, for a fleeting glimpse of a ray of joy!..
Some secret anxiety,
One inconstantly expecting disaster!.."
The boyar, Shuisky, comes in, a cunning courtier and leader of a group of boyars with seditious intentions. He brings bad news: a pretender has raised his head in Lithuania, having taken the name of the Tsarevitch Dimi tri. He has the support of the King of Poland, the Polish nobles and the Pope. Boris requires Shuisky to tell him the truth: is he certain that the babe who was killed in the town of Uglich was the Tsarevitch Dimitri? Shuisky, enjoying the Tsar"s torment, descri bes the deep wound on the Tsarevitch"s neck, and the angelic smile on his lips...
"It seemed, that in his cradle
He was peacefully sleeping..."
Shuisky departs, having aroused with new force the fears and agitation which grip Bo ris: the latter now thinks he sees an appari tion of the murdered Dimitri.

Act III
Scene 4

A ball in the garden of Mnishek, the Governor of Sandomir. The Polish nobles are preparing to march on Moscow. They mean to place their protйgй on the Russian throne: Grigory, the runaway monk from the Chudov monaste ry, who has taken the name of the murdered Tsarevitch Dimitri. In this they will be helped by the ambitious plans of the Governor"s daugh ter, the beautiful Marina, who dreams of beco ming the wife of the future king of Russia. The long-awaited (by the Pretender) rendez vous between Marina and Dimitri who is in love with her takes place. However, Marina s abrupt and calculating speech, and her de termination, which she makes no attempt to conceal, to sit on the Russian throne discon cert the Pretender for a brief moment. Reali zing this, Marina wins him over by false pro testations of her love for him. The Jesuit, Rangoni, celebrates his victory.

Scene 5
An early winter"s morning. A square in front of the Cathedral of St. Basil the Blessed in Moscow. A crowd of starving people are discussing the Pretender s victories over the forces of Boris. A Simpleton comes running into the Square. Urchins surround him and take a kopek from him . The Tsar comes out of the Cathedral. "Bread, bread! Give the starving bread! Give us bread, father, for the sake of Christ!" cries the crowd. Goaded by the urchins, the Simple ton addresses the Tsar: "Order them to be killed, as you killed the little Tsarevitch". Boris tells the boyars not to seize the Simpleton:
"Let him be! Pray for me, simple person..."
But the Simpleton replies:
"No, Boris! It can not be done!
How can one pray for a Tsar Herod?
Our Lady does not allow it..."

Act IV
Scene 6

A clearing in the forest near Kromy. Night-time. The peasants, who are in revolt, lead in a Kromy boyar whom they have taken pris oner. They make fun of the boyar, reminding him of all their grudges:
"You trained us the right way,
In storms and bad weather, and when roads were impassable,
You exploited us,
And whipped us with a slender lash..."
The arrival of the monks, Varlaam and Missail, who denounce the sins of Boris, the regicide, stirs up the crowd s anger even more. They break out into a threatening song:
"A dashing young force is on the rampage,
The Cossack blood is all aflame!
A great subversive power has risen from the depths..."
Jesuit priests, the Pretender"s emissaries, appear. But the arrival of these foreigners arouses the crowd"s indignation. The peas ants drag the Jesuits into the forest to be hanged.
The Pretender, rides into the clearing, sur rounded by troops, Polish gentry and Jesu its. He frees the Kromy boyar. By promising his favor and protection, the Pretender per suades the peasants to march on Moscow. The sky lights up with the glow of a fire. The alarm bell is rung. The Simpleton appears, looking round him in fear. His prophetic words of the new troubles that await the Russian people are spoken in anguish and pain:
"Flow, flow, bitter tears,
Cry, cry, Russian Orthodox soul!
Soon the enemy will come and darkness will fall,
Black, impenetrable darkness..."

Scene 7
The Granovitaya Chamber, in the Kremlin. A session of the Duma is in progress. The boyars are discussing what punishment sho uld be meted out to the Pretender should he be caught. Shuisky appears. He describes the scene in the Tsar"s private apartment, when Boris drove off the apparition of the murdered Tsarevitch Dimitri. At this point, Boris comes running in, shouting: "Away, away, child!" Catching sight of the boyars, he regains his self-control and asks them for advice and help. At this, Shuisky suggests to the Tsar that he listen to a holy man who has come to tell them of a great secret. Boris ag rees. Pimen is brought in. Pimen"s tale of the miraculous cure of a sick man at the gra ve of the murdered Tsarevitch Dimitri, in Uglich, is more than Boris can take and he falls senseless to the floor. Regaining conscious ness, the dying Tsar gives his son advice on how to protect his kingdom:
"Don not trust the slander of the seditious boyars,
Keep a vigilant watch over their secret dealings with Lithuania,
Punish treason without mercy, without charity punish it,
Listen carefully to what the people say -
for their judgement is not hypocritical..."
To the pealing of the funeral bell and the chanting of a choir of monks, the Tsar dies. The shocked Tsarevitch Fyodor, having paid his last respects to his father, rises to his feet...And immediately, Shuisky who, unse en, had crept ahead of him, blocks his way to the throne.

The Main Stage

Boris Godunov (Opera by Modest Mussorgsky)

Boris Godunov (Opera by Modest Mussorgsky)

Opera in four acts.
Libretto by Modest Mussorgsky, based on Alexander Pushkin"s play of the same name.
Version and orchestration by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov.
Orchestration of "At St. Basil Cathedral" scene by Mikhail Ippolitov-Ivanov.
1948 production
Music Director: Nikolai Golovanov.
Stage Director: Leonid Baratov.
Designer: Fyodor Fedorovsky.
Choreographer: Leonid Lavrovsky.
2011 revival
Conductors: Vassily Sinaisky, Pavel Sorokin.
Director: Igor Ushakov.
Designer of scenery revival: Alyona Pikalova.
Designer of costumes revival: Elena Zaytseva.
Choreography revival: Ekaterina Mironova.
Lighting Designer: Sergei Shevchenko.
Chorus Master: Valery Borisov.
Premiered on October 16, 1948.
Sung in Russian.
Presented with three intervals.
Running time: 4 hours 07 minutes.

SYNOPSIS

Prologue
Scene 1

A crowd throngs by the high walls of the Novodevichy Monastery in Moscow. The boyar, Boris Godunov, has withdrawn to the monastery after the death of Tsar Fyodor, who did not leave an heir. That Boris will be elected to the throne is a foregone conclu sion, but he makes a show of refusing the crown so that he is not suspected of wishing to seize power. At the order of a police offi cer, the people beg Godunov to accept election to the throne:
"Do not abandon us, Father,
Do not leave us helpness!"
But Shchelkalov, secretary of the Duma, announces that Boris is implacable.

Scene 2
Square in front of the Cathedral of the As sumption in the Kremlin. A majestic pealing of bells - Boris has given his consent and is being crowned. But Tsar Boris is not happy, he is weighed down by anxiety:
"My soul is heavy,
Some instinctive fear
With ominous foreboding
Rivets my heart..."
In the Kremlin the bells are pealing and the people break out again into acclamation.

Act I
Scene 1

Late at night. A cell in the Chudov Monaste ry. By the light of an icon-lamp, the wise monk Pimen is writing a truthful chronicle of the history of the Russian state. In his chronicle, Pimen reveals the secret of the murder, by Boris Godunov, of Tsarevitch Dimitri who had stood between him and the throne. Grigory, a young novice, sharing Pimen"s cell, wakes up. He listens to the holy man"s tale and a storm of anxieties, passions and vainglorious ambitions breaks into the peace of the night. The idea comes to Grigo ry of calling himself the Tsarevitch and of doing battle with Boris for the throne.
"Boris! Boris! All tremble before you,
No one dares to remind you
Of the fate of the hapless infant...
But meanwhile a hermit in a dark cell
Is writing a terrible denunciation against you.
And you shall not escape human judgment,
As you shall not escape the judgment of heaven!"

Scene 2
An inn near the Lithuanian frontier. Three va gabond monks, Varlaam, Missail and Grigory, have dropped in on the sprightly, merry mistress of the establishment. Varlaam, a drunkard and glutton, sings a song about the capture of Kazan. Grigory, questions the mi stress of the inn on the best route to Lithuania. A police officer comes into the inn: on the Tsar"s orders he is searching for the run away monk, Grigory Otrepiev. After an un successful attempt to deflect the suspicion from himself, Grigory leaps through the win dow and makes good his escape.

Act II
Scene 3

The Tsar"s private apartment in the Kremlin. Tsarevitch Fyodor is looking at the "Book of the Big Drawing", the first map of Russia. Ksenia, Boris" daughter, is grieving before a portrait of her dead fiancй, the heir to the Danish throne. In an attempt to cheer her up, her old nurse tells her a funny story. Boris comes in and talks tenderly to his children, he is pleased to see his son gleaning wis dom from a book. But even here, with his children, Boris is tormented by anguish. Russia has been visited by a terrible famine. "Peop le affected with the plague wander about like wild animals", and the common people bla me the Tsar for all their troubles: "in the squ ares they curse the name of Boris". Some thing approaching a groan breaks out from deep down inside the Tsar:
"All around is darkness and impenetrable gloom,
O, for a fleeting glimpse of a ray of joy!..
Some secret anxiety,
One inconstantly expecting disaster!.."
The boyar, Shuisky, comes in, a cunning courtier and leader of a group of boyars with seditious intentions. He brings bad news: a pretender has raised his head in Lithuania, having taken the name of the Tsarevitch Dimi tri. He has the support of the King of Poland, the Polish nobles and the Pope. Boris requires Shuisky to tell him the truth: is he certain that the babe who was killed in the town of Uglich was the Tsarevitch Dimitri? Shuisky, enjoying the Tsar"s torment, descri bes the deep wound on the Tsarevitch"s neck, and the angelic smile on his lips...
"It seemed, that in his cradle
He was peacefully sleeping..."
Shuisky departs, having aroused with new force the fears and agitation which grip Bo ris: the latter now thinks he sees an appari tion of the murdered Dimitri.

Act III
Scene 4

A ball in the garden of Mnishek, the Governor of Sandomir. The Polish nobles are preparing to march on Moscow. They mean to place their protйgй on the Russian throne: Grigory, the runaway monk from the Chudov monaste ry, who has taken the name of the murdered Tsarevitch Dimitri. In this they will be helped by the ambitious plans of the Governor"s daugh ter, the beautiful Marina, who dreams of beco ming the wife of the future king of Russia. The long-awaited (by the Pretender) rendez vous between Marina and Dimitri who is in love with her takes place. However, Marina s abrupt and calculating speech, and her de termination, which she makes no attempt to conceal, to sit on the Russian throne discon cert the Pretender for a brief moment. Reali zing this, Marina wins him over by false pro testations of her love for him. The Jesuit, Rangoni, celebrates his victory.

Scene 5
An early winter"s morning. A square in front of the Cathedral of St. Basil the Blessed in Moscow. A crowd of starving people are discussing the Pretender s victories over the forces of Boris. A Simpleton comes running into the Square. Urchins surround him and take a kopek from him . The Tsar comes out of the Cathedral. "Bread, bread! Give the starving bread! Give us bread, father, for the sake of Christ!" cries the crowd. Goaded by the urchins, the Simple ton addresses the Tsar: "Order them to be killed, as you killed the little Tsarevitch". Boris tells the boyars not to seize the Simpleton:
"Let him be! Pray for me, simple person..."
But the Simpleton replies:
"No, Boris! It can not be done!
How can one pray for a Tsar Herod?
Our Lady does not allow it..."

Act IV
Scene 6

A clearing in the forest near Kromy. Night-time. The peasants, who are in revolt, lead in a Kromy boyar whom they have taken pris oner. They make fun of the boyar, reminding him of all their grudges:
"You trained us the right way,
In storms and bad weather, and when roads were impassable,
You exploited us,
And whipped us with a slender lash..."
The arrival of the monks, Varlaam and Missail, who denounce the sins of Boris, the regicide, stirs up the crowd s anger even more. They break out into a threatening song:
"A dashing young force is on the rampage,
The Cossack blood is all aflame!
A great subversive power has risen from the depths..."
Jesuit priests, the Pretender"s emissaries, appear. But the arrival of these foreigners arouses the crowd"s indignation. The peas ants drag the Jesuits into the forest to be hanged.
The Pretender, rides into the clearing, sur rounded by troops, Polish gentry and Jesu its. He frees the Kromy boyar. By promising his favor and protection, the Pretender per suades the peasants to march on Moscow. The sky lights up with the glow of a fire. The alarm bell is rung. The Simpleton appears, looking round him in fear. His prophetic words of the new troubles that await the Russian people are spoken in anguish and pain:
"Flow, flow, bitter tears,
Cry, cry, Russian Orthodox soul!
Soon the enemy will come and darkness will fall,
Black, impenetrable darkness..."

Scene 7
The Granovitaya Chamber, in the Kremlin. A session of the Duma is in progress. The boyars are discussing what punishment sho uld be meted out to the Pretender should he be caught. Shuisky appears. He describes the scene in the Tsar"s private apartment, when Boris drove off the apparition of the murdered Tsarevitch Dimitri. At this point, Boris comes running in, shouting: "Away, away, child!" Catching sight of the boyars, he regains his self-control and asks them for advice and help. At this, Shuisky suggests to the Tsar that he listen to a holy man who has come to tell them of a great secret. Boris ag rees. Pimen is brought in. Pimen"s tale of the miraculous cure of a sick man at the gra ve of the murdered Tsarevitch Dimitri, in Uglich, is more than Boris can take and he falls senseless to the floor. Regaining conscious ness, the dying Tsar gives his son advice on how to protect his kingdom:
"Don not trust the slander of the seditious boyars,
Keep a vigilant watch over their secret dealings with Lithuania,
Punish treason without mercy, without charity punish it,
Listen carefully to what the people say -
for their judgement is not hypocritical..."
To the pealing of the funeral bell and the chanting of a choir of monks, the Tsar dies. The shocked Tsarevitch Fyodor, having paid his last respects to his father, rises to his feet...And immediately, Shuisky who, unse en, had crept ahead of him, blocks his way to the throne.

The Main Stage

Le Nozze di Figaro (Opera by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart)

Le Nozze di Figaro (Opera by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart)

Opera in four acts
Music Director: William Lacey
Stage Director: Evgeny Pisarev
Set Designer: Zinovy Margolin
Lighting Designer: Damir Ismagilov
Will be premiered on 25 April 2015

Synopsis

Act I

Figaro and Susanna, servants to the Count and Countess Almaviva, are preparing for their wedding. Figaro is furious when he learns from his bride that the Count has tried to seduce her. He s determined to have his revenge on his master.

Dr. Bartolo appears with his former housekeeper, Marcellina, who is equally determined to marry Figaro. She has a contract: Figaro must marry her or repay the money he borrowed. When Marcellina runs into Susanna, the two rivals exchange insults.

Susanna returns to her room and an adolescent boy, Cherubino, rushes in. Finding Susanna alone, he tells her he loves her - and every other woman in the house. The Count appears, again trying to seduce Susanna, and Cherubino hides. The Count then conceals himself as well when Basilio, the music teacher, approaches. Basilio tells Susanna that Cherubino has a crush on the Countess. This causes the Count to step forward in anger. He becomes even more enraged when he discovers Cherubino and realizes that his attempts to seduce Susanna have been overheard.

He chases Cherubino into the great hall where they are met by Figaro, who has assembled the entire household to sing the praises of their master. The Count is forced to bless the marriage of Figaro and Susanna. To spite them and to silence Cherubino, he orders the boy to join the army without delay. Figaro ironically tells Cherubino what to expect in the army - no flirting with girls, no fancy clothes, no money, just shells, cannons, bullets, marching, and mud.

Act II

In her bedroom, Rosina, the Countess, mourns the loss of love in her life. Encouraged by Figaro and Susanna, she agrees to set a trap for her husband: they will send Cherubino, disguised as Susanna, to a rendezvous with the Count that night and at the same time make him believe that the Countess is having an assignation with another man. Cherubino appears and the two women lock the door, then begin to dress him up as a girl. While Susanna steps into an adjoining room, the Count knocks and is annoyed to find the door locked. Cherubino shuts himself in the dressing room and the Countess lets her husband in. When there s a sudden noise from the dressing room, the Count skeptical of his wife s story that Susanna is in there.

Taking his wife with him, he leaves to get tools to force the door. Meanwhile, Susanna, who has re-entered the room unseen and observed everything, helps Cherubino escape through the window before taking his place in the dressing room. When the Count and Countess return, both are astonished to find Susanna in there. All seems well until the gardener, Antonio, appears, complaining that someone has jumped from the window, ruining his flowers. Figaro, who has rushed in to announce that everything is ready for the wedding, improvises quickly, feigning a limp and pretending that it was he who jumped. At that moment Bartolo, Marcellina, and Basilio arrive, putting their case to the Count and waving the contract that obliges Figaro to marry Marcellina. Delighted, the Count declares that Figaro and Susanna s wedding will be postponed.

Act III

Later in the day in the great hall, Susanna leads the Count on with promises of a rendezvous that night. He is overjoyed but then overhears Susanna conspiring with Figaro. In a rage, he declares he will have revenge.

The Countess, alone, recalls her past happiness. She s determined to go through with the conspiracy against her husband, and she and Susanna compose a letter to him confirming the rendezvous with Susanna that evening in the garden under the pine trees.

Marcellina, supported by a lawyer, Don Curzio, demands that Figaro pay his debt or marry her at once. Figaro replies that he can t without the consent of his parents for whom he s been searching for years, having been abducted as a baby. When he reveals a birthmark on his arm Marcellina realizes that he is her long-lost son, fathered by Bartolo. Seeing Figaro and Marcellina embrace, Susanna thinks her fianc? has betrayed her, but she is pacified when things are explained.

Cherubino, now dressed as a girl, appears with his girlfriend, Barbarina, the daughter of Antonio. Antonio, who has found Cherubino s cap in the garden, also arrives and unmasks the young man. The Count is furious to discover that Cherubino has disobeyed him and is still in the house. But his anger is punctured by Barbarina-who reveals that the Count, when he attempted to seduce her, promised her anything she wanted. What she wants now is to marry Cherubino. The Count is forced to agree. A march is heard and the household assembles for Figaro and Susanna s wedding. While dancing with the Count, Susanna hands him the letter, sealed with a pin.

Act IV

At night in the garden, Barbarina is in despair: she has lost the pin that the Count has asked her to take back to Susanna. When Figaro and Marcellina appear, Barbarina tells them about the planned rendezvous between the Count and Susanna. Thinking that his bride is unfaithful, Figaro rants against all women. He hides when Susanna and the Countess arrive, dressed in each other s clothes. Alone, Susanna sings of love. She knows that Figaro is listening and enjoys making him think that she s about to make love to the Count. Then she also conceals herself-in time to see Cherubino try to seduce the disguised Countess. The boy is chased away by the Count who wants to be alone with the woman he believes to be Susanna. Figaro, by now realizing what is going on, joins in the joke and declares his passion for Susanna in her Countess disguise. The Count returns. Finding Figaro with his wife, or so he thinks, he explodes with rage. At that moment, the real Countess steps forward and reveals her identity. Ashamed, the Count asks her pardon. After many moments of agonizing doubt, she forgives him and both couples are reunited.

New Stage

Swan Lake (Ballet by Pyotr Tchaikovsky)

Swan Lake (Ballet by Pyotr Tchaikovsky)

Ballet in two acts
Libretto by Yuri Grigorovich after scenario by Vladimir Begichev and Vasily Geltser
Choreographer: Yuri Grigorovich (2001 version)
Scenes in choreography by Marius Petipa, Lev Ivanov,?Alexander Gorsky used
Designer: Simon Virsaladze
Music Director: Pavel Sorokin
Lighting Designer: Mikhail Sokolov

SYNOPSIS

Act l
Scene 1

In an old German castle, the birthday of Prince Siegfried is being celebrated; today he comes of age. He is congratulated by his mother, the Princess Mother, friends and courtiers. In a majestic ceremony, Siegfried is made a knight. From this day on a sense of duty, valor will be the guiding principles in his life.
The last toasts are pronounced in his honor, young girls, his contemporaries, try to attract his attention, but Siegfried is overcome by emotions of a different order. He dreams of a pure, ideal love. The festivities draw to an end, the guests depart, leaving the prince alone with his thoughts in the gathering dusk. Night falls. Siegfried is conscious of the presence of a shadow at his side, it is as if some mysterious force is beckoning to him. It is the Evil Genius, or Fate itself, who has come to reveal some perturbing secrets to the Prince. Submitting to the powerful pull of his invisible companion's presence and full of anxious foreboding, Siegfried succumbs to the ideal world of his dreams...

Scene 2
Lured by the Evil Genius, Siegfried finds himself on the banks of a mysterious lake. In the shimmering patches of moonlight on the water, visions of bewitched swan maidens rise up before him. Siegfried catches sight of Odette, the most beautiful of the maidens. He is spell-bound, deeply struck by her beauty. At long last, he has found his romantic ideal of love. He swears to Odette that he will love her forever and be faithful to her.

Act II
Scene 3

Prospective brides-to-be are arriving at the Princess Mother's castle. The Prince must chose one of them to be his wife. But Siegfried can think of nothing but Odette and his meeting of her. He dances in an offhand way with the well-born maidens. Not one of them can compare to his ideal.
Suddenly, a mysterious knight arrives at the ball accompanied by a ravishingly beautiful young girl and a suite of black swans. It is the Evil Genius and Odile, Odette's double. Struck by their resemblance, Siegfried hurries towards Odile. The Evil Genius is putting the Prince's sentiments to the test. Siegfried is enchanted by the perfidious Odile who manages to disarm him of all his doubts. He announces Odile to be his chosen bride. At this very moment, the throne room is plunged in darkness and a vision of the beautiful Odette appears before the assembled company.
Siegfried realizes that he has become a plaything in the hands of Fate. Hoping to atone for his betrayal, he rushes in despair after the receding image of the white swan.

Scene 4
Night-time. A deep gloom overhangs the lake. Odette brings the tragic news; the Prince has broken his vow of faithfulness to her. Siegfried's conscience is deeply troubled; he hurries towards Odette begging for her forgiveness. Odette forgives the youth but she is no longer mistress of her own fate.
The Evil Genius summons up a storm which disperses, plays havoc with, the heroes of our tale, making it impossible for them to unite. Made weak by his single combat with Fate, Siegfried tries in vain to hold on to the vanish image. As dawn breaks, he finds himself alone on the empty banks of the lake of his dreams.

The Main Stage

Swan Lake (Ballet by Pyotr Tchaikovsky)

Swan Lake (Ballet by Pyotr Tchaikovsky)

Ballet in two acts
Libretto by Yuri Grigorovich after scenario by Vladimir Begichev and Vasily Geltser
Choreographer: Yuri Grigorovich (2001 version)
Scenes in choreography by Marius Petipa, Lev Ivanov,?Alexander Gorsky used
Designer: Simon Virsaladze
Music Director: Pavel Sorokin
Lighting Designer: Mikhail Sokolov

SYNOPSIS

Act l
Scene 1

In an old German castle, the birthday of Prince Siegfried is being celebrated; today he comes of age. He is congratulated by his mother, the Princess Mother, friends and courtiers. In a majestic ceremony, Siegfried is made a knight. From this day on a sense of duty, valor will be the guiding principles in his life.
The last toasts are pronounced in his honor, young girls, his contemporaries, try to attract his attention, but Siegfried is overcome by emotions of a different order. He dreams of a pure, ideal love. The festivities draw to an end, the guests depart, leaving the prince alone with his thoughts in the gathering dusk. Night falls. Siegfried is conscious of the presence of a shadow at his side, it is as if some mysterious force is beckoning to him. It is the Evil Genius, or Fate itself, who has come to reveal some perturbing secrets to the Prince. Submitting to the powerful pull of his invisible companion's presence and full of anxious foreboding, Siegfried succumbs to the ideal world of his dreams...

Scene 2
Lured by the Evil Genius, Siegfried finds himself on the banks of a mysterious lake. In the shimmering patches of moonlight on the water, visions of bewitched swan maidens rise up before him. Siegfried catches sight of Odette, the most beautiful of the maidens. He is spell-bound, deeply struck by her beauty. At long last, he has found his romantic ideal of love. He swears to Odette that he will love her forever and be faithful to her.

Act II
Scene 3

Prospective brides-to-be are arriving at the Princess Mother's castle. The Prince must chose one of them to be his wife. But Siegfried can think of nothing but Odette and his meeting of her. He dances in an offhand way with the well-born maidens. Not one of them can compare to his ideal.
Suddenly, a mysterious knight arrives at the ball accompanied by a ravishingly beautiful young girl and a suite of black swans. It is the Evil Genius and Odile, Odette's double. Struck by their resemblance, Siegfried hurries towards Odile. The Evil Genius is putting the Prince's sentiments to the test. Siegfried is enchanted by the perfidious Odile who manages to disarm him of all his doubts. He announces Odile to be his chosen bride. At this very moment, the throne room is plunged in darkness and a vision of the beautiful Odette appears before the assembled company.
Siegfried realizes that he has become a plaything in the hands of Fate. Hoping to atone for his betrayal, he rushes in despair after the receding image of the white swan.

Scene 4
Night-time. A deep gloom overhangs the lake. Odette brings the tragic news; the Prince has broken his vow of faithfulness to her. Siegfried's conscience is deeply troubled; he hurries towards Odette begging for her forgiveness. Odette forgives the youth but she is no longer mistress of her own fate.
The Evil Genius summons up a storm which disperses, plays havoc with, the heroes of our tale, making it impossible for them to unite. Made weak by his single combat with Fate, Siegfried tries in vain to hold on to the vanish image. As dawn breaks, he finds himself alone on the empty banks of the lake of his dreams.

The Main Stage

Le Nozze di Figaro (Opera by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart)

Le Nozze di Figaro (Opera by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart)

Opera in four acts
Music Director: William Lacey
Stage Director: Evgeny Pisarev
Set Designer: Zinovy Margolin
Lighting Designer: Damir Ismagilov
Will be premiered on 25 April 2015

Synopsis

Act I

Figaro and Susanna, servants to the Count and Countess Almaviva, are preparing for their wedding. Figaro is furious when he learns from his bride that the Count has tried to seduce her. He s determined to have his revenge on his master.

Dr. Bartolo appears with his former housekeeper, Marcellina, who is equally determined to marry Figaro. She has a contract: Figaro must marry her or repay the money he borrowed. When Marcellina runs into Susanna, the two rivals exchange insults.

Susanna returns to her room and an adolescent boy, Cherubino, rushes in. Finding Susanna alone, he tells her he loves her - and every other woman in the house. The Count appears, again trying to seduce Susanna, and Cherubino hides. The Count then conceals himself as well when Basilio, the music teacher, approaches. Basilio tells Susanna that Cherubino has a crush on the Countess. This causes the Count to step forward in anger. He becomes even more enraged when he discovers Cherubino and realizes that his attempts to seduce Susanna have been overheard.

He chases Cherubino into the great hall where they are met by Figaro, who has assembled the entire household to sing the praises of their master. The Count is forced to bless the marriage of Figaro and Susanna. To spite them and to silence Cherubino, he orders the boy to join the army without delay. Figaro ironically tells Cherubino what to expect in the army - no flirting with girls, no fancy clothes, no money, just shells, cannons, bullets, marching, and mud.

Act II

In her bedroom, Rosina, the Countess, mourns the loss of love in her life. Encouraged by Figaro and Susanna, she agrees to set a trap for her husband: they will send Cherubino, disguised as Susanna, to a rendezvous with the Count that night and at the same time make him believe that the Countess is having an assignation with another man. Cherubino appears and the two women lock the door, then begin to dress him up as a girl. While Susanna steps into an adjoining room, the Count knocks and is annoyed to find the door locked. Cherubino shuts himself in the dressing room and the Countess lets her husband in. When there s a sudden noise from the dressing room, the Count skeptical of his wife s story that Susanna is in there.

Taking his wife with him, he leaves to get tools to force the door. Meanwhile, Susanna, who has re-entered the room unseen and observed everything, helps Cherubino escape through the window before taking his place in the dressing room. When the Count and Countess return, both are astonished to find Susanna in there. All seems well until the gardener, Antonio, appears, complaining that someone has jumped from the window, ruining his flowers. Figaro, who has rushed in to announce that everything is ready for the wedding, improvises quickly, feigning a limp and pretending that it was he who jumped. At that moment Bartolo, Marcellina, and Basilio arrive, putting their case to the Count and waving the contract that obliges Figaro to marry Marcellina. Delighted, the Count declares that Figaro and Susanna s wedding will be postponed.

Act III

Later in the day in the great hall, Susanna leads the Count on with promises of a rendezvous that night. He is overjoyed but then overhears Susanna conspiring with Figaro. In a rage, he declares he will have revenge.

The Countess, alone, recalls her past happiness. She s determined to go through with the conspiracy against her husband, and she and Susanna compose a letter to him confirming the rendezvous with Susanna that evening in the garden under the pine trees.

Marcellina, supported by a lawyer, Don Curzio, demands that Figaro pay his debt or marry her at once. Figaro replies that he can t without the consent of his parents for whom he s been searching for years, having been abducted as a baby. When he reveals a birthmark on his arm Marcellina realizes that he is her long-lost son, fathered by Bartolo. Seeing Figaro and Marcellina embrace, Susanna thinks her fianc? has betrayed her, but she is pacified when things are explained.

Cherubino, now dressed as a girl, appears with his girlfriend, Barbarina, the daughter of Antonio. Antonio, who has found Cherubino s cap in the garden, also arrives and unmasks the young man. The Count is furious to discover that Cherubino has disobeyed him and is still in the house. But his anger is punctured by Barbarina-who reveals that the Count, when he attempted to seduce her, promised her anything she wanted. What she wants now is to marry Cherubino. The Count is forced to agree. A march is heard and the household assembles for Figaro and Susanna s wedding. While dancing with the Count, Susanna hands him the letter, sealed with a pin.

Act IV

At night in the garden, Barbarina is in despair: she has lost the pin that the Count has asked her to take back to Susanna. When Figaro and Marcellina appear, Barbarina tells them about the planned rendezvous between the Count and Susanna. Thinking that his bride is unfaithful, Figaro rants against all women. He hides when Susanna and the Countess arrive, dressed in each other s clothes. Alone, Susanna sings of love. She knows that Figaro is listening and enjoys making him think that she s about to make love to the Count. Then she also conceals herself-in time to see Cherubino try to seduce the disguised Countess. The boy is chased away by the Count who wants to be alone with the woman he believes to be Susanna. Figaro, by now realizing what is going on, joins in the joke and declares his passion for Susanna in her Countess disguise. The Count returns. Finding Figaro with his wife, or so he thinks, he explodes with rage. At that moment, the real Countess steps forward and reveals her identity. Ashamed, the Count asks her pardon. After many moments of agonizing doubt, she forgives him and both couples are reunited.

New Stage

Swan Lake (Ballet by Pyotr Tchaikovsky)

Swan Lake (Ballet by Pyotr Tchaikovsky)

Ballet in two acts
Libretto by Yuri Grigorovich after scenario by Vladimir Begichev and Vasily Geltser
Choreographer: Yuri Grigorovich (2001 version)
Scenes in choreography by Marius Petipa, Lev Ivanov,?Alexander Gorsky used
Designer: Simon Virsaladze
Music Director: Pavel Sorokin
Lighting Designer: Mikhail Sokolov

SYNOPSIS

Act l
Scene 1

In an old German castle, the birthday of Prince Siegfried is being celebrated; today he comes of age. He is congratulated by his mother, the Princess Mother, friends and courtiers. In a majestic ceremony, Siegfried is made a knight. From this day on a sense of duty, valor will be the guiding principles in his life.
The last toasts are pronounced in his honor, young girls, his contemporaries, try to attract his attention, but Siegfried is overcome by emotions of a different order. He dreams of a pure, ideal love. The festivities draw to an end, the guests depart, leaving the prince alone with his thoughts in the gathering dusk. Night falls. Siegfried is conscious of the presence of a shadow at his side, it is as if some mysterious force is beckoning to him. It is the Evil Genius, or Fate itself, who has come to reveal some perturbing secrets to the Prince. Submitting to the powerful pull of his invisible companion's presence and full of anxious foreboding, Siegfried succumbs to the ideal world of his dreams...

Scene 2
Lured by the Evil Genius, Siegfried finds himself on the banks of a mysterious lake. In the shimmering patches of moonlight on the water, visions of bewitched swan maidens rise up before him. Siegfried catches sight of Odette, the most beautiful of the maidens. He is spell-bound, deeply struck by her beauty. At long last, he has found his romantic ideal of love. He swears to Odette that he will love her forever and be faithful to her.

Act II
Scene 3

Prospective brides-to-be are arriving at the Princess Mother's castle. The Prince must chose one of them to be his wife. But Siegfried can think of nothing but Odette and his meeting of her. He dances in an offhand way with the well-born maidens. Not one of them can compare to his ideal.
Suddenly, a mysterious knight arrives at the ball accompanied by a ravishingly beautiful young girl and a suite of black swans. It is the Evil Genius and Odile, Odette's double. Struck by their resemblance, Siegfried hurries towards Odile. The Evil Genius is putting the Prince's sentiments to the test. Siegfried is enchanted by the perfidious Odile who manages to disarm him of all his doubts. He announces Odile to be his chosen bride. At this very moment, the throne room is plunged in darkness and a vision of the beautiful Odette appears before the assembled company.
Siegfried realizes that he has become a plaything in the hands of Fate. Hoping to atone for his betrayal, he rushes in despair after the receding image of the white swan.

Scene 4
Night-time. A deep gloom overhangs the lake. Odette brings the tragic news; the Prince has broken his vow of faithfulness to her. Siegfried's conscience is deeply troubled; he hurries towards Odette begging for her forgiveness. Odette forgives the youth but she is no longer mistress of her own fate.
The Evil Genius summons up a storm which disperses, plays havoc with, the heroes of our tale, making it impossible for them to unite. Made weak by his single combat with Fate, Siegfried tries in vain to hold on to the vanish image. As dawn breaks, he finds himself alone on the empty banks of the lake of his dreams.

The Main Stage

Swan Lake (Ballet by Pyotr Tchaikovsky)

Swan Lake (Ballet by Pyotr Tchaikovsky)

Ballet in two acts
Libretto by Yuri Grigorovich after scenario by Vladimir Begichev and Vasily Geltser
Choreographer: Yuri Grigorovich (2001 version)
Scenes in choreography by Marius Petipa, Lev Ivanov,?Alexander Gorsky used
Designer: Simon Virsaladze
Music Director: Pavel Sorokin
Lighting Designer: Mikhail Sokolov

SYNOPSIS

Act l
Scene 1

In an old German castle, the birthday of Prince Siegfried is being celebrated; today he comes of age. He is congratulated by his mother, the Princess Mother, friends and courtiers. In a majestic ceremony, Siegfried is made a knight. From this day on a sense of duty, valor will be the guiding principles in his life.
The last toasts are pronounced in his honor, young girls, his contemporaries, try to attract his attention, but Siegfried is overcome by emotions of a different order. He dreams of a pure, ideal love. The festivities draw to an end, the guests depart, leaving the prince alone with his thoughts in the gathering dusk. Night falls. Siegfried is conscious of the presence of a shadow at his side, it is as if some mysterious force is beckoning to him. It is the Evil Genius, or Fate itself, who has come to reveal some perturbing secrets to the Prince. Submitting to the powerful pull of his invisible companion's presence and full of anxious foreboding, Siegfried succumbs to the ideal world of his dreams...

Scene 2
Lured by the Evil Genius, Siegfried finds himself on the banks of a mysterious lake. In the shimmering patches of moonlight on the water, visions of bewitched swan maidens rise up before him. Siegfried catches sight of Odette, the most beautiful of the maidens. He is spell-bound, deeply struck by her beauty. At long last, he has found his romantic ideal of love. He swears to Odette that he will love her forever and be faithful to her.

Act II
Scene 3

Prospective brides-to-be are arriving at the Princess Mother's castle. The Prince must chose one of them to be his wife. But Siegfried can think of nothing but Odette and his meeting of her. He dances in an offhand way with the well-born maidens. Not one of them can compare to his ideal.
Suddenly, a mysterious knight arrives at the ball accompanied by a ravishingly beautiful young girl and a suite of black swans. It is the Evil Genius and Odile, Odette's double. Struck by their resemblance, Siegfried hurries towards Odile. The Evil Genius is putting the Prince's sentiments to the test. Siegfried is enchanted by the perfidious Odile who manages to disarm him of all his doubts. He announces Odile to be his chosen bride. At this very moment, the throne room is plunged in darkness and a vision of the beautiful Odette appears before the assembled company.
Siegfried realizes that he has become a plaything in the hands of Fate. Hoping to atone for his betrayal, he rushes in despair after the receding image of the white swan.

Scene 4
Night-time. A deep gloom overhangs the lake. Odette brings the tragic news; the Prince has broken his vow of faithfulness to her. Siegfried's conscience is deeply troubled; he hurries towards Odette begging for her forgiveness. Odette forgives the youth but she is no longer mistress of her own fate.
The Evil Genius summons up a storm which disperses, plays havoc with, the heroes of our tale, making it impossible for them to unite. Made weak by his single combat with Fate, Siegfried tries in vain to hold on to the vanish image. As dawn breaks, he finds himself alone on the empty banks of the lake of his dreams.

The Main Stage

Le Nozze di Figaro (Opera by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart)

Le Nozze di Figaro (Opera by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart)

Opera in four acts
Music Director: William Lacey
Stage Director: Evgeny Pisarev
Set Designer: Zinovy Margolin
Lighting Designer: Damir Ismagilov
Will be premiered on 25 April 2015

Synopsis

Act I

Figaro and Susanna, servants to the Count and Countess Almaviva, are preparing for their wedding. Figaro is furious when he learns from his bride that the Count has tried to seduce her. He s determined to have his revenge on his master.

Dr. Bartolo appears with his former housekeeper, Marcellina, who is equally determined to marry Figaro. She has a contract: Figaro must marry her or repay the money he borrowed. When Marcellina runs into Susanna, the two rivals exchange insults.

Susanna returns to her room and an adolescent boy, Cherubino, rushes in. Finding Susanna alone, he tells her he loves her - and every other woman in the house. The Count appears, again trying to seduce Susanna, and Cherubino hides. The Count then conceals himself as well when Basilio, the music teacher, approaches. Basilio tells Susanna that Cherubino has a crush on the Countess. This causes the Count to step forward in anger. He becomes even more enraged when he discovers Cherubino and realizes that his attempts to seduce Susanna have been overheard.

He chases Cherubino into the great hall where they are met by Figaro, who has assembled the entire household to sing the praises of their master. The Count is forced to bless the marriage of Figaro and Susanna. To spite them and to silence Cherubino, he orders the boy to join the army without delay. Figaro ironically tells Cherubino what to expect in the army - no flirting with girls, no fancy clothes, no money, just shells, cannons, bullets, marching, and mud.

Act II

In her bedroom, Rosina, the Countess, mourns the loss of love in her life. Encouraged by Figaro and Susanna, she agrees to set a trap for her husband: they will send Cherubino, disguised as Susanna, to a rendezvous with the Count that night and at the same time make him believe that the Countess is having an assignation with another man. Cherubino appears and the two women lock the door, then begin to dress him up as a girl. While Susanna steps into an adjoining room, the Count knocks and is annoyed to find the door locked. Cherubino shuts himself in the dressing room and the Countess lets her husband in. When there s a sudden noise from the dressing room, the Count skeptical of his wife s story that Susanna is in there.

Taking his wife with him, he leaves to get tools to force the door. Meanwhile, Susanna, who has re-entered the room unseen and observed everything, helps Cherubino escape through the window before taking his place in the dressing room. When the Count and Countess return, both are astonished to find Susanna in there. All seems well until the gardener, Antonio, appears, complaining that someone has jumped from the window, ruining his flowers. Figaro, who has rushed in to announce that everything is ready for the wedding, improvises quickly, feigning a limp and pretending that it was he who jumped. At that moment Bartolo, Marcellina, and Basilio arrive, putting their case to the Count and waving the contract that obliges Figaro to marry Marcellina. Delighted, the Count declares that Figaro and Susanna s wedding will be postponed.

Act III

Later in the day in the great hall, Susanna leads the Count on with promises of a rendezvous that night. He is overjoyed but then overhears Susanna conspiring with Figaro. In a rage, he declares he will have revenge.

The Countess, alone, recalls her past happiness. She s determined to go through with the conspiracy against her husband, and she and Susanna compose a letter to him confirming the rendezvous with Susanna that evening in the garden under the pine trees.

Marcellina, supported by a lawyer, Don Curzio, demands that Figaro pay his debt or marry her at once. Figaro replies that he can t without the consent of his parents for whom he s been searching for years, having been abducted as a baby. When he reveals a birthmark on his arm Marcellina realizes that he is her long-lost son, fathered by Bartolo. Seeing Figaro and Marcellina embrace, Susanna thinks her fianc? has betrayed her, but she is pacified when things are explained.

Cherubino, now dressed as a girl, appears with his girlfriend, Barbarina, the daughter of Antonio. Antonio, who has found Cherubino s cap in the garden, also arrives and unmasks the young man. The Count is furious to discover that Cherubino has disobeyed him and is still in the house. But his anger is punctured by Barbarina-who reveals that the Count, when he attempted to seduce her, promised her anything she wanted. What she wants now is to marry Cherubino. The Count is forced to agree. A march is heard and the household assembles for Figaro and Susanna s wedding. While dancing with the Count, Susanna hands him the letter, sealed with a pin.

Act IV

At night in the garden, Barbarina is in despair: she has lost the pin that the Count has asked her to take back to Susanna. When Figaro and Marcellina appear, Barbarina tells them about the planned rendezvous between the Count and Susanna. Thinking that his bride is unfaithful, Figaro rants against all women. He hides when Susanna and the Countess arrive, dressed in each other s clothes. Alone, Susanna sings of love. She knows that Figaro is listening and enjoys making him think that she s about to make love to the Count. Then she also conceals herself-in time to see Cherubino try to seduce the disguised Countess. The boy is chased away by the Count who wants to be alone with the woman he believes to be Susanna. Figaro, by now realizing what is going on, joins in the joke and declares his passion for Susanna in her Countess disguise. The Count returns. Finding Figaro with his wife, or so he thinks, he explodes with rage. At that moment, the real Countess steps forward and reveals her identity. Ashamed, the Count asks her pardon. After many moments of agonizing doubt, she forgives him and both couples are reunited.

New Stage

Don Quixote (Ballet by Marius Petipa, Alexander Gorsky. Ludwig Minkus)

Don Quixote (Ballet by Marius Petipa, Alexander Gorsky. Ludwig Minkus)

Ludwig Minkus
Libretto by Marius Petipa after the novel of the same name by Miguel de Cervantes
Choreography: Marius Petipa, Alexander Gorsky
New choreographic version: Alexei Fadeyechev
Music Director: Pavel Sorokin
Designer: Valery Leventhal
Costume Designer: Elena Zaitseva
Lighting Designer: Damir Ismagilov
Executive Designer: Olga Medvedeva
Use is made in the production of choreography by Rostislav Zakharov (Dance with Guitars and Jig to music by V. Soloviev-Sedoy); by Kasiyan Goleizovsky (Gipsy Dance to music by V. Zhelobinsky); by Anatoly Simachev (Fandango to music by E. Napravnik).
Will be premiered February 2, 2016.

SYNOPSIS

Prologue
Don Quixote, having read his fill of romances about knights and chivalry, decides to set off on his travels in order to achieve great feats, which willbring glory to his name. As his sword-bearer, he chooses the loyal Sancho Panza, a man of sober outlook who is not prone to dreams.

Act I
In Barcelona there is festive anima?tion in the air. Kitri, daughter of the innkeeper, is flirting with Basilio, the barber, who is in love with her.Finding them together Lorenzo, Kitri s father, chases Basilio away: the barber is no fit match for his daughter. Lorenzo intends Kitri to marry Gamache, a rich noble?man. Kitri refuses outright tosubmit to her father s will.

At the height of the merry-making, Don Quixote appears in the square, accompanied by his sword bearer, Sancho Panza. Catching sight of the innkeeper, Don Quixote mistakes him for the owner of aknight s castle and greets him with respect. Lorenzo responds in like terms and invites Don Quixote into the inn. Sancho Panza is left in the square. But when some young people start to mock Sancho,Don Quixote immediately hurries to his sword-bearer s rescue.

Seeing Kitri, Don Quixote thinks she is the beautiful Dulcinea whom he has seen in his dreams and chosen as the lady of his heart . But Kitri disappears. She has run off with Basilio. Lorenzo,Gamache and Don Quixote set out to look for her.

Act II
Scene 1

Kitri and Basilio are hiding in a tavern. Here they are found by Lorenzo, Gamache and Don Quixote. Lorenzowishes to make an immediate announce?ment of the betrothal of Kitri and Gamache. But Basilio, by agreement with Kitri, pretends to take his life. Kitri sobs over the body of her sweetheart. DonQuixote overcоme by noble indignation accuses Lorenzo of hardheartedness and, threatening him with his sword forces him to agree to his daughter s marriage with the barber Basilio jumps to his feet.There is no point in him pretending to be dead am longer.

Scene 2
In the glade by the windmills is a sprawling gipsy encampment. Here too is a puppet theatre. Don Quixote and Sancho soon appear on the scene. The ownerof the puppet theatre invites Don Quixote to watch a show. Don Quixote follows the performance with rapt attention and, forgetting it is theatre, rushes on to the stage, sword in hand, to defendthose who need his protection. He breaks down the stage, sends the puppets flying and, catching sight of the windmills, mistakes them for evil magicians whom he has to get the better of. Grabbing amill sail, he is first lifted into the air and then falls to the ground.

Scene 3
The wounded Don Quixote and Sancho Panza find themselves in a forest. To Don Quixote, the forest seems to be full of monsters and giants. Sancho Panzasettles Don Quixote down to sleep, while he runs off for help. In his dreams, Don Quixote sees Dulcinea, the lady of his heart , surrounded by Dryads and fairies Sancho Panza comes back with theDuke and Duchess who have been hunting in the forest. He begs them to help the dreaming Don Quixote. The Duke and Duchess invite the wandering knight to visit them m their castle.

Act III
The Duke s castle. All is ready for the reception of Don Quixote.
Having heard from Sancho Panza the happy story of Kitri and Basilio s love, the Duke and Duchess have kindly agreed to allow them to hold their wedding in the castle. Don Quixote and Sancho Panza areinvited to occupy the seats of honor. A solemn procession files past. Catching sight of Kitri, Don Quixote again mis?takes her for the lady of his reveries . But the Duke and Sancho Panza manage topersuade him that she is the very same innkeeper s daughter whom he helped to unite with Basilio, her sweetheart.
The festivities continue. All thank the va?liant knight and his faithful sword-bearer.

The Main Stage

Le Nozze di Figaro (Opera by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart)

Le Nozze di Figaro (Opera by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart)

Opera in four acts
Music Director: William Lacey
Stage Director: Evgeny Pisarev
Set Designer: Zinovy Margolin
Lighting Designer: Damir Ismagilov
Will be premiered on 25 April 2015

Synopsis

Act I

Figaro and Susanna, servants to the Count and Countess Almaviva, are preparing for their wedding. Figaro is furious when he learns from his bride that the Count has tried to seduce her. He s determined to have his revenge on his master.

Dr. Bartolo appears with his former housekeeper, Marcellina, who is equally determined to marry Figaro. She has a contract: Figaro must marry her or repay the money he borrowed. When Marcellina runs into Susanna, the two rivals exchange insults.

Susanna returns to her room and an adolescent boy, Cherubino, rushes in. Finding Susanna alone, he tells her he loves her - and every other woman in the house. The Count appears, again trying to seduce Susanna, and Cherubino hides. The Count then conceals himself as well when Basilio, the music teacher, approaches. Basilio tells Susanna that Cherubino has a crush on the Countess. This causes the Count to step forward in anger. He becomes even more enraged when he discovers Cherubino and realizes that his attempts to seduce Susanna have been overheard.

He chases Cherubino into the great hall where they are met by Figaro, who has assembled the entire household to sing the praises of their master. The Count is forced to bless the marriage of Figaro and Susanna. To spite them and to silence Cherubino, he orders the boy to join the army without delay. Figaro ironically tells Cherubino what to expect in the army - no flirting with girls, no fancy clothes, no money, just shells, cannons, bullets, marching, and mud.

Act II

In her bedroom, Rosina, the Countess, mourns the loss of love in her life. Encouraged by Figaro and Susanna, she agrees to set a trap for her husband: they will send Cherubino, disguised as Susanna, to a rendezvous with the Count that night and at the same time make him believe that the Countess is having an assignation with another man. Cherubino appears and the two women lock the door, then begin to dress him up as a girl. While Susanna steps into an adjoining room, the Count knocks and is annoyed to find the door locked. Cherubino shuts himself in the dressing room and the Countess lets her husband in. When there s a sudden noise from the dressing room, the Count skeptical of his wife s story that Susanna is in there.

Taking his wife with him, he leaves to get tools to force the door. Meanwhile, Susanna, who has re-entered the room unseen and observed everything, helps Cherubino escape through the window before taking his place in the dressing room. When the Count and Countess return, both are astonished to find Susanna in there. All seems well until the gardener, Antonio, appears, complaining that someone has jumped from the window, ruining his flowers. Figaro, who has rushed in to announce that everything is ready for the wedding, improvises quickly, feigning a limp and pretending that it was he who jumped. At that moment Bartolo, Marcellina, and Basilio arrive, putting their case to the Count and waving the contract that obliges Figaro to marry Marcellina. Delighted, the Count declares that Figaro and Susanna s wedding will be postponed.

Act III

Later in the day in the great hall, Susanna leads the Count on with promises of a rendezvous that night. He is overjoyed but then overhears Susanna conspiring with Figaro. In a rage, he declares he will have revenge.

The Countess, alone, recalls her past happiness. She s determined to go through with the conspiracy against her husband, and she and Susanna compose a letter to him confirming the rendezvous with Susanna that evening in the garden under the pine trees.

Marcellina, supported by a lawyer, Don Curzio, demands that Figaro pay his debt or marry her at once. Figaro replies that he can t without the consent of his parents for whom he s been searching for years, having been abducted as a baby. When he reveals a birthmark on his arm Marcellina realizes that he is her long-lost son, fathered by Bartolo. Seeing Figaro and Marcellina embrace, Susanna thinks her fianc? has betrayed her, but she is pacified when things are explained.

Cherubino, now dressed as a girl, appears with his girlfriend, Barbarina, the daughter of Antonio. Antonio, who has found Cherubino s cap in the garden, also arrives and unmasks the young man. The Count is furious to discover that Cherubino has disobeyed him and is still in the house. But his anger is punctured by Barbarina-who reveals that the Count, when he attempted to seduce her, promised her anything she wanted. What she wants now is to marry Cherubino. The Count is forced to agree. A march is heard and the household assembles for Figaro and Susanna s wedding. While dancing with the Count, Susanna hands him the letter, sealed with a pin.

Act IV

At night in the garden, Barbarina is in despair: she has lost the pin that the Count has asked her to take back to Susanna. When Figaro and Marcellina appear, Barbarina tells them about the planned rendezvous between the Count and Susanna. Thinking that his bride is unfaithful, Figaro rants against all women. He hides when Susanna and the Countess arrive, dressed in each other s clothes. Alone, Susanna sings of love. She knows that Figaro is listening and enjoys making him think that she s about to make love to the Count. Then she also conceals herself-in time to see Cherubino try to seduce the disguised Countess. The boy is chased away by the Count who wants to be alone with the woman he believes to be Susanna. Figaro, by now realizing what is going on, joins in the joke and declares his passion for Susanna in her Countess disguise. The Count returns. Finding Figaro with his wife, or so he thinks, he explodes with rage. At that moment, the real Countess steps forward and reveals her identity. Ashamed, the Count asks her pardon. After many moments of agonizing doubt, she forgives him and both couples are reunited.

New Stage

Don Quixote (Ballet by Marius Petipa, Alexander Gorsky. Ludwig Minkus)

Don Quixote (Ballet by Marius Petipa, Alexander Gorsky. Ludwig Minkus)

Ludwig Minkus
Libretto by Marius Petipa after the novel of the same name by Miguel de Cervantes
Choreography: Marius Petipa, Alexander Gorsky
New choreographic version: Alexei Fadeyechev
Music Director: Pavel Sorokin
Designer: Valery Leventhal
Costume Designer: Elena Zaitseva
Lighting Designer: Damir Ismagilov
Executive Designer: Olga Medvedeva
Use is made in the production of choreography by Rostislav Zakharov (Dance with Guitars and Jig to music by V. Soloviev-Sedoy); by Kasiyan Goleizovsky (Gipsy Dance to music by V. Zhelobinsky); by Anatoly Simachev (Fandango to music by E. Napravnik).
Will be premiered February 2, 2016.

SYNOPSIS

Prologue
Don Quixote, having read his fill of romances about knights and chivalry, decides to set off on his travels in order to achieve great feats, which willbring glory to his name. As his sword-bearer, he chooses the loyal Sancho Panza, a man of sober outlook who is not prone to dreams.

Act I
In Barcelona there is festive anima?tion in the air. Kitri, daughter of the innkeeper, is flirting with Basilio, the barber, who is in love with her.Finding them together Lorenzo, Kitri s father, chases Basilio away: the barber is no fit match for his daughter. Lorenzo intends Kitri to marry Gamache, a rich noble?man. Kitri refuses outright tosubmit to her father s will.

At the height of the merry-making, Don Quixote appears in the square, accompanied by his sword bearer, Sancho Panza. Catching sight of the innkeeper, Don Quixote mistakes him for the owner of aknight s castle and greets him with respect. Lorenzo responds in like terms and invites Don Quixote into the inn. Sancho Panza is left in the square. But when some young people start to mock Sancho,Don Quixote immediately hurries to his sword-bearer s rescue.

Seeing Kitri, Don Quixote thinks she is the beautiful Dulcinea whom he has seen in his dreams and chosen as the lady of his heart . But Kitri disappears. She has run off with Basilio. Lorenzo,Gamache and Don Quixote set out to look for her.

Act II
Scene 1

Kitri and Basilio are hiding in a tavern. Here they are found by Lorenzo, Gamache and Don Quixote. Lorenzowishes to make an immediate announce?ment of the betrothal of Kitri and Gamache. But Basilio, by agreement with Kitri, pretends to take his life. Kitri sobs over the body of her sweetheart. DonQuixote overcоme by noble indignation accuses Lorenzo of hardheartedness and, threatening him with his sword forces him to agree to his daughter s marriage with the barber Basilio jumps to his feet.There is no point in him pretending to be dead am longer.

Scene 2
In the glade by the windmills is a sprawling gipsy encampment. Here too is a puppet theatre. Don Quixote and Sancho soon appear on the scene. The ownerof the puppet theatre invites Don Quixote to watch a show. Don Quixote follows the performance with rapt attention and, forgetting it is theatre, rushes on to the stage, sword in hand, to defendthose who need his protection. He breaks down the stage, sends the puppets flying and, catching sight of the windmills, mistakes them for evil magicians whom he has to get the better of. Grabbing amill sail, he is first lifted into the air and then falls to the ground.

Scene 3
The wounded Don Quixote and Sancho Panza find themselves in a forest. To Don Quixote, the forest seems to be full of monsters and giants. Sancho Panzasettles Don Quixote down to sleep, while he runs off for help. In his dreams, Don Quixote sees Dulcinea, the lady of his heart , surrounded by Dryads and fairies Sancho Panza comes back with theDuke and Duchess who have been hunting in the forest. He begs them to help the dreaming Don Quixote. The Duke and Duchess invite the wandering knight to visit them m their castle.

Act III
The Duke s castle. All is ready for the reception of Don Quixote.
Having heard from Sancho Panza the happy story of Kitri and Basilio s love, the Duke and Duchess have kindly agreed to allow them to hold their wedding in the castle. Don Quixote and Sancho Panza areinvited to occupy the seats of honor. A solemn procession files past. Catching sight of Kitri, Don Quixote again mis?takes her for the lady of his reveries . But the Duke and Sancho Panza manage topersuade him that she is the very same innkeeper s daughter whom he helped to unite with Basilio, her sweetheart.
The festivities continue. All thank the va?liant knight and his faithful sword-bearer.

The Main Stage

Don Pasquale (Opera by Gaetano Donizetti)

Don Pasquale (Opera by Gaetano Donizetti)

Gaetano Donizetti
Opera in three acts
Libretto by Giovanni Ruffini based on Angelo Anelli"s libretto "Ser Marcantonio"
Music Director: Michal Klauza
Stage Director: Timofey Kulyabin
Set Designer: Oleg Golovko
Costume Designer: Galya Solodovnikova
Lighting Designer: Denis Solntsev
Chief Chorus Master: Valery Borisov
Dramaturge: Ilya Kukharenko
Premiered on April 19, 2016.

Synopsis
St. Jerome University, Rome, present day.

Act I
Scene One. The University

Don Pasquale, a renowned scholar and a confirmed bachelor, makes a decision to marry on the brink of his 70th birthday.
He receives Dr Malatesta, who offers him his sister Sofronia as a bride-to-be. The girl was raised in a convent and is full of virtue. Inflamed Pasquale sends Malatesta to fetch her.
The bridegroom is anxious to share the happy news with his subordinates and his nephew Ernesto. The uncle and the nephew have been in conflict for a long time. Don Pasquale threatens to cut Ernesto off and even disinherit him by marrying, if Ernesto keeps resisting the good match arranged by his uncle, but the young man remains true to his love for the penniless young widow Norina.
Knowing now that Don Pasquale"s marriage is no blind threat, Ernesto is in turmoil. In addition he learns from his uncle that his friend Malatesta betrayed him by arranging Don Pasquale"s betrothal.
Insulted by his nephew"s obstinacy and derision, Don Pasquale cuts him off and kicks him out.

Scene Two. Norina"s flat
Norina spends her morning reading romantic novels and imagining herself as a heroine, when she is delivered a message from Ernesto. He bids his farewell as he is going to leave the country. The woman"s plans to marry him are ruined.
Malatesta arrives and comforts Norina"s distress: his new plan is to wed Norina to Don Pasquale by disguising her as a meek and virtuous Sofronia. Malatesta"s cousin Carlotto is to impersonate a notary. Once the fake marriage contract is signed, Norina is to make the old man"s life insufferable, so that he comes to his senses and agrees to his nephew"s marriage with Norina.
Malatesta and Norina rehearse the behaviour of the simple and naive girl Sofronia and discuss the details of their plot.

Act II
The University

Ernesto says goodbye to his alma mater where he spent his adolescence, and composes another farewell letter to his beloved.
Don Pasquale prepares to meet his bride. Malatesta introduces Norina as the shy Sofronia. Don Pasquale is enchanted and implores Malatesta to fetch a notary without delay and conclude the marriage contract.
Carlotto arrives disguised as a notary. Rejoicing, Don Pasquale assigns half of his property to his new wife and bequeaths all his estate to be administrated by her.
As they proceed to sign the contract, Ernesto rushes in to say goodbye to his uncle. He is shocked to find out that Norina is the bride: Malatesta did not warn him beforehand thinking he was already away. Now Malatesta has to drag Ernesto in off the cuff. Eventually Malatesta makes Ernesto sign the marriage contract as the final witness.
After the formal part is completed, Norina stops pretending docile, positions herself in charge and confronts Don Pasquale, then summons his personnel and gives them absurd orders. Puzzled, the University staff has to obey. Don Pasquale is dismayed at his bride"s transformation and feels that he was betrayed, but the contract is already concluded.

Act III
Scene One. The University

Norina and Malatesta have changed the plan of the upcoming celebration of Don Pasquale"s birthday and are now preparing a new programme for the event. The whole University watches the preparations in astonishment. Don Pasquale has to pay countless bills.
He spots Sofronia/Norina leave the building dressed in an evening frock. Despite all the quarrels Don Pasquale still hopes to set things right with his young wife on their wedding night. He tries to stop her, but she mocks him and slaps him in the face. He is in despair. Sofronia/Norina goes away but secretly leaves behind a fake note from a lover about a date that night. Don Pasquale is mad with jealousy.
Don Pasquale"s employees discuss the new establishment and constant fighting between the spouses.
Malatesta sends Ernesto to the garden to impersonate Sofronia"s lover. Don Pasquale arrives. He is broken and devastated. He complains to Malatesta about Sofronia"s severity and harshness and accuses his wife of adultery. He wants to catch her in flagrante and call the police.
Malatesta consoles Don Pasquale and persuades him to keep the matter silent: if Sofronia is caught, she might quietly concede to divorce. Don Pasquale agrees with this plan and aspires for revenge and redemption.

Scene Two. The "garden"
Ernesto sings a serenade to Sofronia pretending to be her lover. Then he and Norina sing a love duet to attract Don Pasquale"s attention, and Ernesto hides away.
Don Pasquale"s hopes to catch both Sofronia/Norina and her lover are ruined as he finds her alone. She is outraged and denies all his accusations, as well as his claims for divorce. Don Pasquale is desperate to break the marriage bonds. Malatesta offers his help, provided that he is given a free hand.
In Don Pasquale"s presence Malatesta tells Sofronia that soon she will have to share her authority as a mistress with Norina, Ernesto"s future wife. Sofronia takes this ill. It is she who demands a divorce now. Pasquale is anxious to secure it by arranging his nephew"s wedding right away and even providing the couple with a substantial sum of money. He summons Ernesto to wed him to Norina at once.
Ernesto arrives. He, Norina and Malatesta confess their fraud. Don Pasquale is relieved to learn that his marriage was fake and that Sofronia is in fact Norina. He pardons everyone and gives his blessing to the loving couple.

New Stage

Don Pasquale (Opera by Gaetano Donizetti)

Don Pasquale (Opera by Gaetano Donizetti)

Gaetano Donizetti
Opera in three acts
Libretto by Giovanni Ruffini based on Angelo Anelli"s libretto "Ser Marcantonio"
Music Director: Michal Klauza
Stage Director: Timofey Kulyabin
Set Designer: Oleg Golovko
Costume Designer: Galya Solodovnikova
Lighting Designer: Denis Solntsev
Chief Chorus Master: Valery Borisov
Dramaturge: Ilya Kukharenko
Premiered on April 19, 2016.

Synopsis
St. Jerome University, Rome, present day.

Act I
Scene One. The University

Don Pasquale, a renowned scholar and a confirmed bachelor, makes a decision to marry on the brink of his 70th birthday.
He receives Dr Malatesta, who offers him his sister Sofronia as a bride-to-be. The girl was raised in a convent and is full of virtue. Inflamed Pasquale sends Malatesta to fetch her.
The bridegroom is anxious to share the happy news with his subordinates and his nephew Ernesto. The uncle and the nephew have been in conflict for a long time. Don Pasquale threatens to cut Ernesto off and even disinherit him by marrying, if Ernesto keeps resisting the good match arranged by his uncle, but the young man remains true to his love for the penniless young widow Norina.
Knowing now that Don Pasquale"s marriage is no blind threat, Ernesto is in turmoil. In addition he learns from his uncle that his friend Malatesta betrayed him by arranging Don Pasquale"s betrothal.
Insulted by his nephew"s obstinacy and derision, Don Pasquale cuts him off and kicks him out.

Scene Two. Norina"s flat
Norina spends her morning reading romantic novels and imagining herself as a heroine, when she is delivered a message from Ernesto. He bids his farewell as he is going to leave the country. The woman"s plans to marry him are ruined.
Malatesta arrives and comforts Norina"s distress: his new plan is to wed Norina to Don Pasquale by disguising her as a meek and virtuous Sofronia. Malatesta"s cousin Carlotto is to impersonate a notary. Once the fake marriage contract is signed, Norina is to make the old man"s life insufferable, so that he comes to his senses and agrees to his nephew"s marriage with Norina.
Malatesta and Norina rehearse the behaviour of the simple and naive girl Sofronia and discuss the details of their plot.

Act II
The University

Ernesto says goodbye to his alma mater where he spent his adolescence, and composes another farewell letter to his beloved.
Don Pasquale prepares to meet his bride. Malatesta introduces Norina as the shy Sofronia. Don Pasquale is enchanted and implores Malatesta to fetch a notary without delay and conclude the marriage contract.
Carlotto arrives disguised as a notary. Rejoicing, Don Pasquale assigns half of his property to his new wife and bequeaths all his estate to be administrated by her.
As they proceed to sign the contract, Ernesto rushes in to say goodbye to his uncle. He is shocked to find out that Norina is the bride: Malatesta did not warn him beforehand thinking he was already away. Now Malatesta has to drag Ernesto in off the cuff. Eventually Malatesta makes Ernesto sign the marriage contract as the final witness.
After the formal part is completed, Norina stops pretending docile, positions herself in charge and confronts Don Pasquale, then summons his personnel and gives them absurd orders. Puzzled, the University staff has to obey. Don Pasquale is dismayed at his bride"s transformation and feels that he was betrayed, but the contract is already concluded.

Act III
Scene One. The University

Norina and Malatesta have changed the plan of the upcoming celebration of Don Pasquale"s birthday and are now preparing a new programme for the event. The whole University watches the preparations in astonishment. Don Pasquale has to pay countless bills.
He spots Sofronia/Norina leave the building dressed in an evening frock. Despite all the quarrels Don Pasquale still hopes to set things right with his young wife on their wedding night. He tries to stop her, but she mocks him and slaps him in the face. He is in despair. Sofronia/Norina goes away but secretly leaves behind a fake note from a lover about a date that night. Don Pasquale is mad with jealousy.
Don Pasquale"s employees discuss the new establishment and constant fighting between the spouses.
Malatesta sends Ernesto to the garden to impersonate Sofronia"s lover. Don Pasquale arrives. He is broken and devastated. He complains to Malatesta about Sofronia"s severity and harshness and accuses his wife of adultery. He wants to catch her in flagrante and call the police.
Malatesta consoles Don Pasquale and persuades him to keep the matter silent: if Sofronia is caught, she might quietly concede to divorce. Don Pasquale agrees with this plan and aspires for revenge and redemption.

Scene Two. The "garden"
Ernesto sings a serenade to Sofronia pretending to be her lover. Then he and Norina sing a love duet to attract Don Pasquale"s attention, and Ernesto hides away.
Don Pasquale"s hopes to catch both Sofronia/Norina and her lover are ruined as he finds her alone. She is outraged and denies all his accusations, as well as his claims for divorce. Don Pasquale is desperate to break the marriage bonds. Malatesta offers his help, provided that he is given a free hand.
In Don Pasquale"s presence Malatesta tells Sofronia that soon she will have to share her authority as a mistress with Norina, Ernesto"s future wife. Sofronia takes this ill. It is she who demands a divorce now. Pasquale is anxious to secure it by arranging his nephew"s wedding right away and even providing the couple with a substantial sum of money. He summons Ernesto to wed him to Norina at once.
Ernesto arrives. He, Norina and Malatesta confess their fraud. Don Pasquale is relieved to learn that his marriage was fake and that Sofronia is in fact Norina. He pardons everyone and gives his blessing to the loving couple.

New Stage

Jewels (Ballet by George Balancine)

Jewels (Ballet by George Balancine)

Ballet by George Balancine in three parts.
Will be premiered at the Bolshoi Theatre on May 5, 2012.

Emeralds
to music by Gabriel Faure

Rubies
to music by Igor Stravinsky
The score has been made available by Boosey & Hawkes Music Publishers Limited

Diamonds
to music by Pyotr Tchaikovsky

Teachers-Repetiteurs: Sandra Jennings, Merrill Ashley, Paul Boos
Set Designer: Alyona Pikalova
Costume Designer: Elena Zaitseva
Music Director: Pavel Sorokin

The Main Stage

Jewels (Ballet by George Balancine)

Jewels (Ballet by George Balancine)

Ballet by George Balancine in three parts.
Will be premiered at the Bolshoi Theatre on May 5, 2012.

Emeralds
to music by Gabriel Faure

Rubies
to music by Igor Stravinsky
The score has been made available by Boosey & Hawkes Music Publishers Limited

Diamonds
to music by Pyotr Tchaikovsky

Teachers-Repetiteurs: Sandra Jennings, Merrill Ashley, Paul Boos
Set Designer: Alyona Pikalova
Costume Designer: Elena Zaitseva
Music Director: Pavel Sorokin

The Main Stage

Don Pasquale (Opera by Gaetano Donizetti)

Don Pasquale (Opera by Gaetano Donizetti)

Gaetano Donizetti
Opera in three acts
Libretto by Giovanni Ruffini based on Angelo Anelli"s libretto "Ser Marcantonio"
Music Director: Michal Klauza
Stage Director: Timofey Kulyabin
Set Designer: Oleg Golovko
Costume Designer: Galya Solodovnikova
Lighting Designer: Denis Solntsev
Chief Chorus Master: Valery Borisov
Dramaturge: Ilya Kukharenko
Premiered on April 19, 2016.

Synopsis
St. Jerome University, Rome, present day.

Act I
Scene One. The University

Don Pasquale, a renowned scholar and a confirmed bachelor, makes a decision to marry on the brink of his 70th birthday.
He receives Dr Malatesta, who offers him his sister Sofronia as a bride-to-be. The girl was raised in a convent and is full of virtue. Inflamed Pasquale sends Malatesta to fetch her.
The bridegroom is anxious to share the happy news with his subordinates and his nephew Ernesto. The uncle and the nephew have been in conflict for a long time. Don Pasquale threatens to cut Ernesto off and even disinherit him by marrying, if Ernesto keeps resisting the good match arranged by his uncle, but the young man remains true to his love for the penniless young widow Norina.
Knowing now that Don Pasquale"s marriage is no blind threat, Ernesto is in turmoil. In addition he learns from his uncle that his friend Malatesta betrayed him by arranging Don Pasquale"s betrothal.
Insulted by his nephew"s obstinacy and derision, Don Pasquale cuts him off and kicks him out.

Scene Two. Norina"s flat
Norina spends her morning reading romantic novels and imagining herself as a heroine, when she is delivered a message from Ernesto. He bids his farewell as he is going to leave the country. The woman"s plans to marry him are ruined.
Malatesta arrives and comforts Norina"s distress: his new plan is to wed Norina to Don Pasquale by disguising her as a meek and virtuous Sofronia. Malatesta"s cousin Carlotto is to impersonate a notary. Once the fake marriage contract is signed, Norina is to make the old man"s life insufferable, so that he comes to his senses and agrees to his nephew"s marriage with Norina.
Malatesta and Norina rehearse the behaviour of the simple and naive girl Sofronia and discuss the details of their plot.

Act II
The University

Ernesto says goodbye to his alma mater where he spent his adolescence, and composes another farewell letter to his beloved.
Don Pasquale prepares to meet his bride. Malatesta introduces Norina as the shy Sofronia. Don Pasquale is enchanted and implores Malatesta to fetch a notary without delay and conclude the marriage contract.
Carlotto arrives disguised as a notary. Rejoicing, Don Pasquale assigns half of his property to his new wife and bequeaths all his estate to be administrated by her.
As they proceed to sign the contract, Ernesto rushes in to say goodbye to his uncle. He is shocked to find out that Norina is the bride: Malatesta did not warn him beforehand thinking he was already away. Now Malatesta has to drag Ernesto in off the cuff. Eventually Malatesta makes Ernesto sign the marriage contract as the final witness.
After the formal part is completed, Norina stops pretending docile, positions herself in charge and confronts Don Pasquale, then summons his personnel and gives them absurd orders. Puzzled, the University staff has to obey. Don Pasquale is dismayed at his bride"s transformation and feels that he was betrayed, but the contract is already concluded.

Act III
Scene One. The University

Norina and Malatesta have changed the plan of the upcoming celebration of Don Pasquale"s birthday and are now preparing a new programme for the event. The whole University watches the preparations in astonishment. Don Pasquale has to pay countless bills.
He spots Sofronia/Norina leave the building dressed in an evening frock. Despite all the quarrels Don Pasquale still hopes to set things right with his young wife on their wedding night. He tries to stop her, but she mocks him and slaps him in the face. He is in despair. Sofronia/Norina goes away but secretly leaves behind a fake note from a lover about a date that night. Don Pasquale is mad with jealousy.
Don Pasquale"s employees discuss the new establishment and constant fighting between the spouses.
Malatesta sends Ernesto to the garden to impersonate Sofronia"s lover. Don Pasquale arrives. He is broken and devastated. He complains to Malatesta about Sofronia"s severity and harshness and accuses his wife of adultery. He wants to catch her in flagrante and call the police.
Malatesta consoles Don Pasquale and persuades him to keep the matter silent: if Sofronia is caught, she might quietly concede to divorce. Don Pasquale agrees with this plan and aspires for revenge and redemption.

Scene Two. The "garden"
Ernesto sings a serenade to Sofronia pretending to be her lover. Then he and Norina sing a love duet to attract Don Pasquale"s attention, and Ernesto hides away.
Don Pasquale"s hopes to catch both Sofronia/Norina and her lover are ruined as he finds her alone. She is outraged and denies all his accusations, as well as his claims for divorce. Don Pasquale is desperate to break the marriage bonds. Malatesta offers his help, provided that he is given a free hand.
In Don Pasquale"s presence Malatesta tells Sofronia that soon she will have to share her authority as a mistress with Norina, Ernesto"s future wife. Sofronia takes this ill. It is she who demands a divorce now. Pasquale is anxious to secure it by arranging his nephew"s wedding right away and even providing the couple with a substantial sum of money. He summons Ernesto to wed him to Norina at once.
Ernesto arrives. He, Norina and Malatesta confess their fraud. Don Pasquale is relieved to learn that his marriage was fake and that Sofronia is in fact Norina. He pardons everyone and gives his blessing to the loving couple.

New Stage

Jewels (Ballet by George Balancine)

Jewels (Ballet by George Balancine)

Ballet by George Balancine in three parts.
Will be premiered at the Bolshoi Theatre on May 5, 2012.

Emeralds
to music by Gabriel Faure

Rubies
to music by Igor Stravinsky
The score has been made available by Boosey & Hawkes Music Publishers Limited

Diamonds
to music by Pyotr Tchaikovsky

Teachers-Repetiteurs: Sandra Jennings, Merrill Ashley, Paul Boos
Set Designer: Alyona Pikalova
Costume Designer: Elena Zaitseva
Music Director: Pavel Sorokin

The Main Stage

Le carnaval des animaux. The Young Person s Guide to the Orchestra

Le carnaval des animaux. The Young Person s Guide to the Orchestra

Camille Saint-Saens. Benjamin Britten
Music Director: Anton Grishanin
Director: Alexei Frandetti
Will be premiered on September 24, 2017

New Stage

Jewels (Ballet by George Balancine)

Jewels (Ballet by George Balancine)

Ballet by George Balancine in three parts.
Will be premiered at the Bolshoi Theatre on May 5, 2012.

Emeralds
to music by Gabriel Faure

Rubies
to music by Igor Stravinsky
The score has been made available by Boosey & Hawkes Music Publishers Limited

Diamonds
to music by Pyotr Tchaikovsky

Teachers-Repetiteurs: Sandra Jennings, Merrill Ashley, Paul Boos
Set Designer: Alyona Pikalova
Costume Designer: Elena Zaitseva
Music Director: Pavel Sorokin

The Main Stage

Prince Igor (Opera by Alexander Borodin)

Prince Igor (Opera by Alexander Borodin)

Opera in four acts
Music Director: Vassily Sinaisky
Stage Director: Yuri Lyubimov
Set Designer: Zinovy Margolin
Costume Designer: Maria Danilova
Lighting Designer: Damir Ismagilov
Chorus Master: Valery Borisov
Choreography: Kasiyan Goleyzovsky
Ballet Master: Yuri Grigorovich
Premiered on June 8, 2013
Running time: 2 hours 45 minutes

SYNOPSIS

Act I
Scene 1

Prince Igor, the only one amongst Russian princes, together with his son Vladimir and his armed force, is preparing to set off on a campaign against the nomad Polovtsy whose barbaric raids have laid waste the Russian land. The people sing the praises of Igor and warriors and wish them victory.
Igor and his army depart to pursue the Polovtsy. All of a sudden, it grows dark - due to an eclipse of the sun. Two members of Igor"s force, Skula and Yeroshka, desert from it unnoticed: they intend to switch to Prince Vladimir Galitsky"s service.

Scene 2
Young Polovetsian maidens sing and dance trying to distract the beautiful Konchakovna, daughter of Khan Konchak. All Konchakovna"s thoughts are concentrated on the captive youth - Prince Vladimir. She is waiting impatiently for a meeting with him. Enter Vladimir, Igor"s son, he is passionately in love with Konchakovna. Prince Igor refuses to consider his son"s marriage while they are prisoners. Konchak, though, is ready to give his daughter"s hand to the young Russian prince.
Prince Igor cannot sleep. It is hard to come to terms with the infamy of defeat and being a prisoner of war. Igor passionately longs for freedom, to liberate Russia. He thinks tenderly of his wife Yaroslavna.
Ovlur, a Christian Polovetsian, unexpectedly approaches Igor. He offers to help him escape. But the latter refuses - to run away furtively is beneath the dignity of a Russian prince.
Konchak, the Polovetsian Khan, treats Igor as an honored guest, showing him every consideration. He promises to set him free so long as he swears in future never to raise his sword against the Polovtsy. But, not concealing his intentions, Igor rejects Konchak"s offer: on acquiring his freedom, he will again raise an army and declare war on the Polovtsy. Konchak is impressed by the Russian prince"s pride and bravery. The Khan orders his dancing slaves and warriors to give a performance for Igor to disperse the latter"s melancholy mood; they sing the praises of the conqueror, the all-powerful Konchak.

Act II
Scene 1

Surrounded by his tipsy retainers, led by Skula and Yeroshka, Prince Galitsky is living it up. A little taste of power, has made him want more - he has a scheme to dispatch Yaroslavna to a nunnery and, having removed Igor, take his place as ruler of Putivl.
Young girls beg Galitsky to free their friend who has been abducted by his men. But to laughter from the drunken crowd, Galitsky turns a deaf ear to their plea and chases them off.
Yaroslavna is full of anxiety. She is haunted night and day by sinister dreams and forebodings. For a long time, there has been no word from the prince. She is surrounded by dissension, sedition, even that of her own brother, Vladimir, who wants to remove Igor and rule in Putivl.
The girls seek Yaroslavna"s protection from their offender. Yaroslavna accuses her brother of being a traitor, but is unable to assert her authority over him. Called to account by the Princess, Galitsky is insolently defiant with his sister, threatening both her and Prince Igor.
Enter some boyars with bad news: Igor"s army is decimated, Igor himself and his son have been taken captive, the Russian princes are bogged down in strife and the Polovetsian hordes are marching on Russia.
The alarm bell sounds, warning of danger - the Polovtsy are approaching Putivl. The boyars and the people defend their land against the enemy.

Scene 2
The Polovtsy gather together to pay homage to their mighty Khan. His forces have returned home laden with booty.
On hearing from them of the disaster which has overtaken his native Putivl, Igor desires to unite the Russian princes and acclaim them with passion. Now he is agree to escape with Ovlur.
Konchakovna rouses the sleeping camp and detains Vladimir; Igor manages to give his guards the slip. The angry khans demand Vladimir"s death, but Konchakovna won"t allow them to take him, and Konchak proclaims Vladimir his son-in-law.

Scene 3
Yaroslavna is lamenting her husband, having lost all hope she will ever see him again. Turning to the sun, the Dnieper, she demands them to tell her where Igor is, what fate has befallen him? Yaroslavna"s lament is echoed by that of the Russian peasants who are mourning their devastated native land.
Then the princess catches sight of two horsemen in the distance. It is Prince Igor and Ovlur. At long last her beloved husband has come home!
Skula and Yeroshka mock their captive prince. When they see Igor they are stunned. In order to avoid well-deserved punishment, the wiley Skula suggests to Yeroshka that they be the first to ring the church bells to inform the people of their prince"s return.
At the sound of the bells, the people come running to hear the news and joyfully greet Igor and the other princes who have arrived in Putivl, ready to unite and defend their land.

The Main Stage

Flames of Paris (Ballet by Boris Asafiev)

Flames of Paris (Ballet by Boris Asafiev)

Ballet in two acts
Book by Alexander Belinsky and Alexei Ratmansky
on the basis of the original libretto by Nikolai Volkov and Vladimir Dmitriev
Choreographer - Alexei Ratmansky
with use of the original choreography by Vasily Vainonen
Music Director - Pavel Sorokin
Scenographers - Ilya Utkin, Evgeny Monakhov
Costume Designer - Yelena Markovskaya
Lighting Designer - Damir Ismagilov
Music dramaturgy conception - Yuri Burlaka
Premiered on July 3, 2008.
Presented with one interval.
Running time: 2 hours 15 minutes.

SYNOPSIS

Act I
Scene 1

A suburb of Marseilles, the town which gave its name to the French National anthem. Through the forest a large group of people are on the move. This is the battalion of the Marseillais who are on their way to Paris. A cannon which they are taking with them indicates their intentions. Among the men of Marseilles is Philippe.
It is by the cannon that Philippe makes the acquaintance of the peasant girl Jeanne. He kisses her on parting. Jeanne s brother, Jerome, longs to join the Marseillais.
In the distance is the castle of the Marquis Costa de Beauregard, the local seigneur. Hunters are returning to the castle, among whom are the Marquis and his daughter, Adeline.
The noble Marquis makes advances to the pretty peasant girl, Jeanne. The latter tries to free herself from his pawing, but only manages to do so with the help of Jerome, who comes to his sister s defense.
Jerome is beaten up by the hunters from the Marquis s suite, and thrown into a prison cellar. Adeline, who has observed the scene, frees Jerome, and in their hearts a mutual feeling for each other is born. The sinister, old woman Jarcasse, who has been employed by the Marquis to keep an eye on his daughter, informs her adored master of the escape. The Marquis slaps his daughter and orders her to get into a carriage, accompanied by Jarcasse. They are going to Paris.
Jerome bids farewell to his parents. It is not safe for him to remain on the Marquis s estate. He and Jeanne go off with a detachment of the Marseillais. Their parents are inconsolable.
Volunteers are enrolling in the detachment. Together with the crowd, the men of Marseilles dance a farandola. The men put on red caps in place of their old headwear. Jerome is given a gun by the leader of the insurgents, Gilbert. Jerome and Philippe harness themselves to the cannon. The detachment moves off to Paris to the strains of the Marseillaise.

Scene 2
The sound of the Marseillaise gives way to an elegant minuet. The royal palace. The Marquis and Adeline have arrived here. The Master of Ceremonies announces the start of the ball.
Rinaldo and Armida, a court ballet, with the Paris stars Mireille de Poitiers and Antoine Mistral:
Sarabande - Armida and her friends. Armida s forces return from a campaign. Prisoners are led in. Among them is Prince Rinaldo.
Amour aims an arrow at the hearts of Armida and Rinaldo. Variation - Amour. Armida frees Rinaldo.
Pas de deux Rinaldo and Armida.
The phantom of Rinaldo s bride appears. Rinaldo abandons Armida and sails off in a boat after the phantom. Armida conjures up a storm. Waves cast Rinaldo onto the seashore, he is surrounded by furies.
Dance - Furies. Rinaldo falls dead at Armida s feet.
King Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette make their entrance. Greetings, oaths of loyalty and toasts to the prosperity of the monarchy follow.
The tipsy Marquis chooses the Actress as his next victim, and starts to court her in the same way as he had Jeanne, the peasant girl. The strains of the Marseillaise are heard from the street. The courtiers and officers panic. Making use of this, Adeline escapes from the palace.

Act II
Scene 3

A square in Paris, into which the men of Marseilles march, among whom are Philippe, Jerome and Jeanne. A shot from their cannon is to give the signal for the start of the assault on the Tuileries.
Suddenly, in the square, Jerome catches sight of Adeline. He rushes over to her. The sinister, old woman Jarcasse spies on their meeting.
In the meantime, in honor of the arrival of the detachment of men from Marseilles, a barrel of wine is rolled out into the square. Dances get underway: the Auvergne dance gives way to the Marseillaise dance, then the temperamental dance of the Basques starts up, in which all the chief characters take part: Jeanne, Philippe, Adeline, Jerome and Gilbert, the captain of the Marseillais.
In the crowd, flushed with wine, petty brawls break out here and there. Stuffed dolls of Louis and Marie Antoinette are torn to pieces. Jeanne with a spear in her hands dances the carmagnole to the singing of the crowd. Philippe, who is drunk, lights the fuse, there is volley of cannon fire, after which the crowd dashes off to storm the Tuileries.
Against a background of shots being fired and the beating of drums, Adeline and Jerome declare their love for each other. They are oblivious to what is going on around them.
The Marseillais break into the palace. They are led by Jeanne, waving a flag. Fighting. The palace is taken.

Scene 4
The crowd fills the square which is decorated with lanterns. Members of the Convention and new government mount the tribune.
The crowd rejoices. The famous artists, Mireille de Poitiers and Antoine Mistral, who before had entertained the king and his courtiers, now perform the Freedom dance for the people. The new dance is little different to the old, only now, the actress holds the Republican flag in her hands. Artist David is sketching the celebration.
By the cannon, from which the first volley had been fired, the President of the Convention unites the hands of Jeanne and Philippe. These are the first young newly weds of the new Republic
The sound of Jeanne and Philippe s betrothal dance gives way to the muffled thuds of the falling knife of the guillotine.
The condemned Marquis is led in. Seeing her father, Adeline rushes over to him, but Jerome, Jeanne and Philippe beg her not to give herself away. In order to revenge the Marquis, Jarcasse betrays Adeline, revealing her true origins. Roused to fury, the crowd demands her death. Beside himself with despair, Jerome tries to save Adeline, but to no avail. She is guillotined. Frightened for their lives, Jeanne and Philippe restrain the struggling Jerome.
The celebration continues. To the strains of Ca ira, the triumphant populace moves downstage towards the audience.

New Stage

Prince Igor (Opera by Alexander Borodin)

Prince Igor (Opera by Alexander Borodin)

Opera in four acts
Music Director: Vassily Sinaisky
Stage Director: Yuri Lyubimov
Set Designer: Zinovy Margolin
Costume Designer: Maria Danilova
Lighting Designer: Damir Ismagilov
Chorus Master: Valery Borisov
Choreography: Kasiyan Goleyzovsky
Ballet Master: Yuri Grigorovich
Premiered on June 8, 2013
Running time: 2 hours 45 minutes

SYNOPSIS

Act I
Scene 1

Prince Igor, the only one amongst Russian princes, together with his son Vladimir and his armed force, is preparing to set off on a campaign against the nomad Polovtsy whose barbaric raids have laid waste the Russian land. The people sing the praises of Igor and warriors and wish them victory.
Igor and his army depart to pursue the Polovtsy. All of a sudden, it grows dark - due to an eclipse of the sun. Two members of Igor"s force, Skula and Yeroshka, desert from it unnoticed: they intend to switch to Prince Vladimir Galitsky"s service.

Scene 2
Young Polovetsian maidens sing and dance trying to distract the beautiful Konchakovna, daughter of Khan Konchak. All Konchakovna"s thoughts are concentrated on the captive youth - Prince Vladimir. She is waiting impatiently for a meeting with him. Enter Vladimir, Igor"s son, he is passionately in love with Konchakovna. Prince Igor refuses to consider his son"s marriage while they are prisoners. Konchak, though, is ready to give his daughter"s hand to the young Russian prince.
Prince Igor cannot sleep. It is hard to come to terms with the infamy of defeat and being a prisoner of war. Igor passionately longs for freedom, to liberate Russia. He thinks tenderly of his wife Yaroslavna.
Ovlur, a Christian Polovetsian, unexpectedly approaches Igor. He offers to help him escape. But the latter refuses - to run away furtively is beneath the dignity of a Russian prince.
Konchak, the Polovetsian Khan, treats Igor as an honored guest, showing him every consideration. He promises to set him free so long as he swears in future never to raise his sword against the Polovtsy. But, not concealing his intentions, Igor rejects Konchak"s offer: on acquiring his freedom, he will again raise an army and declare war on the Polovtsy. Konchak is impressed by the Russian prince"s pride and bravery. The Khan orders his dancing slaves and warriors to give a performance for Igor to disperse the latter"s melancholy mood; they sing the praises of the conqueror, the all-powerful Konchak.

Act II
Scene 1

Surrounded by his tipsy retainers, led by Skula and Yeroshka, Prince Galitsky is living it up. A little taste of power, has made him want more - he has a scheme to dispatch Yaroslavna to a nunnery and, having removed Igor, take his place as ruler of Putivl.
Young girls beg Galitsky to free their friend who has been abducted by his men. But to laughter from the drunken crowd, Galitsky turns a deaf ear to their plea and chases them off.
Yaroslavna is full of anxiety. She is haunted night and day by sinister dreams and forebodings. For a long time, there has been no word from the prince. She is surrounded by dissension, sedition, even that of her own brother, Vladimir, who wants to remove Igor and rule in Putivl.
The girls seek Yaroslavna"s protection from their offender. Yaroslavna accuses her brother of being a traitor, but is unable to assert her authority over him. Called to account by the Princess, Galitsky is insolently defiant with his sister, threatening both her and Prince Igor.
Enter some boyars with bad news: Igor"s army is decimated, Igor himself and his son have been taken captive, the Russian princes are bogged down in strife and the Polovetsian hordes are marching on Russia.
The alarm bell sounds, warning of danger - the Polovtsy are approaching Putivl. The boyars and the people defend their land against the enemy.

Scene 2
The Polovtsy gather together to pay homage to their mighty Khan. His forces have returned home laden with booty.
On hearing from them of the disaster which has overtaken his native Putivl, Igor desires to unite the Russian princes and acclaim them with passion. Now he is agree to escape with Ovlur.
Konchakovna rouses the sleeping camp and detains Vladimir; Igor manages to give his guards the slip. The angry khans demand Vladimir"s death, but Konchakovna won"t allow them to take him, and Konchak proclaims Vladimir his son-in-law.

Scene 3
Yaroslavna is lamenting her husband, having lost all hope she will ever see him again. Turning to the sun, the Dnieper, she demands them to tell her where Igor is, what fate has befallen him? Yaroslavna"s lament is echoed by that of the Russian peasants who are mourning their devastated native land.
Then the princess catches sight of two horsemen in the distance. It is Prince Igor and Ovlur. At long last her beloved husband has come home!
Skula and Yeroshka mock their captive prince. When they see Igor they are stunned. In order to avoid well-deserved punishment, the wiley Skula suggests to Yeroshka that they be the first to ring the church bells to inform the people of their prince"s return.
At the sound of the bells, the people come running to hear the news and joyfully greet Igor and the other princes who have arrived in Putivl, ready to unite and defend their land.

The Main Stage

Flames of Paris (Ballet by Boris Asafiev)

Flames of Paris (Ballet by Boris Asafiev)

Ballet in two acts
Book by Alexander Belinsky and Alexei Ratmansky
on the basis of the original libretto by Nikolai Volkov and Vladimir Dmitriev
Choreographer - Alexei Ratmansky
with use of the original choreography by Vasily Vainonen
Music Director - Pavel Sorokin
Scenographers - Ilya Utkin, Evgeny Monakhov
Costume Designer - Yelena Markovskaya
Lighting Designer - Damir Ismagilov
Music dramaturgy conception - Yuri Burlaka
Premiered on July 3, 2008.
Presented with one interval.
Running time: 2 hours 15 minutes.

SYNOPSIS

Act I
Scene 1

A suburb of Marseilles, the town which gave its name to the French National anthem. Through the forest a large group of people are on the move. This is the battalion of the Marseillais who are on their way to Paris. A cannon which they are taking with them indicates their intentions. Among the men of Marseilles is Philippe.
It is by the cannon that Philippe makes the acquaintance of the peasant girl Jeanne. He kisses her on parting. Jeanne s brother, Jerome, longs to join the Marseillais.
In the distance is the castle of the Marquis Costa de Beauregard, the local seigneur. Hunters are returning to the castle, among whom are the Marquis and his daughter, Adeline.
The noble Marquis makes advances to the pretty peasant girl, Jeanne. The latter tries to free herself from his pawing, but only manages to do so with the help of Jerome, who comes to his sister s defense.
Jerome is beaten up by the hunters from the Marquis s suite, and thrown into a prison cellar. Adeline, who has observed the scene, frees Jerome, and in their hearts a mutual feeling for each other is born. The sinister, old woman Jarcasse, who has been employed by the Marquis to keep an eye on his daughter, informs her adored master of the escape. The Marquis slaps his daughter and orders her to get into a carriage, accompanied by Jarcasse. They are going to Paris.
Jerome bids farewell to his parents. It is not safe for him to remain on the Marquis s estate. He and Jeanne go off with a detachment of the Marseillais. Their parents are inconsolable.
Volunteers are enrolling in the detachment. Together with the crowd, the men of Marseilles dance a farandola. The men put on red caps in place of their old headwear. Jerome is given a gun by the leader of the insurgents, Gilbert. Jerome and Philippe harness themselves to the cannon. The detachment moves off to Paris to the strains of the Marseillaise.

Scene 2
The sound of the Marseillaise gives way to an elegant minuet. The royal palace. The Marquis and Adeline have arrived here. The Master of Ceremonies announces the start of the ball.
Rinaldo and Armida, a court ballet, with the Paris stars Mireille de Poitiers and Antoine Mistral:
Sarabande - Armida and her friends. Armida s forces return from a campaign. Prisoners are led in. Among them is Prince Rinaldo.
Amour aims an arrow at the hearts of Armida and Rinaldo. Variation - Amour. Armida frees Rinaldo.
Pas de deux Rinaldo and Armida.
The phantom of Rinaldo s bride appears. Rinaldo abandons Armida and sails off in a boat after the phantom. Armida conjures up a storm. Waves cast Rinaldo onto the seashore, he is surrounded by furies.
Dance - Furies. Rinaldo falls dead at Armida s feet.
King Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette make their entrance. Greetings, oaths of loyalty and toasts to the prosperity of the monarchy follow.
The tipsy Marquis chooses the Actress as his next victim, and starts to court her in the same way as he had Jeanne, the peasant girl. The strains of the Marseillaise are heard from the street. The courtiers and officers panic. Making use of this, Adeline escapes from the palace.

Act II
Scene 3

A square in Paris, into which the men of Marseilles march, among whom are Philippe, Jerome and Jeanne. A shot from their cannon is to give the signal for the start of the assault on the Tuileries.
Suddenly, in the square, Jerome catches sight of Adeline. He rushes over to her. The sinister, old woman Jarcasse spies on their meeting.
In the meantime, in honor of the arrival of the detachment of men from Marseilles, a barrel of wine is rolled out into the square. Dances get underway: the Auvergne dance gives way to the Marseillaise dance, then the temperamental dance of the Basques starts up, in which all the chief characters take part: Jeanne, Philippe, Adeline, Jerome and Gilbert, the captain of the Marseillais.
In the crowd, flushed with wine, petty brawls break out here and there. Stuffed dolls of Louis and Marie Antoinette are torn to pieces. Jeanne with a spear in her hands dances the carmagnole to the singing of the crowd. Philippe, who is drunk, lights the fuse, there is volley of cannon fire, after which the crowd dashes off to storm the Tuileries.
Against a background of shots being fired and the beating of drums, Adeline and Jerome declare their love for each other. They are oblivious to what is going on around them.
The Marseillais break into the palace. They are led by Jeanne, waving a flag. Fighting. The palace is taken.

Scene 4
The crowd fills the square which is decorated with lanterns. Members of the Convention and new government mount the tribune.
The crowd rejoices. The famous artists, Mireille de Poitiers and Antoine Mistral, who before had entertained the king and his courtiers, now perform the Freedom dance for the people. The new dance is little different to the old, only now, the actress holds the Republican flag in her hands. Artist David is sketching the celebration.
By the cannon, from which the first volley had been fired, the President of the Convention unites the hands of Jeanne and Philippe. These are the first young newly weds of the new Republic
The sound of Jeanne and Philippe s betrothal dance gives way to the muffled thuds of the falling knife of the guillotine.
The condemned Marquis is led in. Seeing her father, Adeline rushes over to him, but Jerome, Jeanne and Philippe beg her not to give herself away. In order to revenge the Marquis, Jarcasse betrays Adeline, revealing her true origins. Roused to fury, the crowd demands her death. Beside himself with despair, Jerome tries to save Adeline, but to no avail. She is guillotined. Frightened for their lives, Jeanne and Philippe restrain the struggling Jerome.
The celebration continues. To the strains of Ca ira, the triumphant populace moves downstage towards the audience.

New Stage

Prince Igor (Opera by Alexander Borodin)

Prince Igor (Opera by Alexander Borodin)

Opera in four acts
Music Director: Vassily Sinaisky
Stage Director: Yuri Lyubimov
Set Designer: Zinovy Margolin
Costume Designer: Maria Danilova
Lighting Designer: Damir Ismagilov
Chorus Master: Valery Borisov
Choreography: Kasiyan Goleyzovsky
Ballet Master: Yuri Grigorovich
Premiered on June 8, 2013
Running time: 2 hours 45 minutes

SYNOPSIS

Act I
Scene 1

Prince Igor, the only one amongst Russian princes, together with his son Vladimir and his armed force, is preparing to set off on a campaign against the nomad Polovtsy whose barbaric raids have laid waste the Russian land. The people sing the praises of Igor and warriors and wish them victory.
Igor and his army depart to pursue the Polovtsy. All of a sudden, it grows dark - due to an eclipse of the sun. Two members of Igor"s force, Skula and Yeroshka, desert from it unnoticed: they intend to switch to Prince Vladimir Galitsky"s service.

Scene 2
Young Polovetsian maidens sing and dance trying to distract the beautiful Konchakovna, daughter of Khan Konchak. All Konchakovna"s thoughts are concentrated on the captive youth - Prince Vladimir. She is waiting impatiently for a meeting with him. Enter Vladimir, Igor"s son, he is passionately in love with Konchakovna. Prince Igor refuses to consider his son"s marriage while they are prisoners. Konchak, though, is ready to give his daughter"s hand to the young Russian prince.
Prince Igor cannot sleep. It is hard to come to terms with the infamy of defeat and being a prisoner of war. Igor passionately longs for freedom, to liberate Russia. He thinks tenderly of his wife Yaroslavna.
Ovlur, a Christian Polovetsian, unexpectedly approaches Igor. He offers to help him escape. But the latter refuses - to run away furtively is beneath the dignity of a Russian prince.
Konchak, the Polovetsian Khan, treats Igor as an honored guest, showing him every consideration. He promises to set him free so long as he swears in future never to raise his sword against the Polovtsy. But, not concealing his intentions, Igor rejects Konchak"s offer: on acquiring his freedom, he will again raise an army and declare war on the Polovtsy. Konchak is impressed by the Russian prince"s pride and bravery. The Khan orders his dancing slaves and warriors to give a performance for Igor to disperse the latter"s melancholy mood; they sing the praises of the conqueror, the all-powerful Konchak.

Act II
Scene 1

Surrounded by his tipsy retainers, led by Skula and Yeroshka, Prince Galitsky is living it up. A little taste of power, has made him want more - he has a scheme to dispatch Yaroslavna to a nunnery and, having removed Igor, take his place as ruler of Putivl.
Young girls beg Galitsky to free their friend who has been abducted by his men. But to laughter from the drunken crowd, Galitsky turns a deaf ear to their plea and chases them off.
Yaroslavna is full of anxiety. She is haunted night and day by sinister dreams and forebodings. For a long time, there has been no word from the prince. She is surrounded by dissension, sedition, even that of her own brother, Vladimir, who wants to remove Igor and rule in Putivl.
The girls seek Yaroslavna"s protection from their offender. Yaroslavna accuses her brother of being a traitor, but is unable to assert her authority over him. Called to account by the Princess, Galitsky is insolently defiant with his sister, threatening both her and Prince Igor.
Enter some boyars with bad news: Igor"s army is decimated, Igor himself and his son have been taken captive, the Russian princes are bogged down in strife and the Polovetsian hordes are marching on Russia.
The alarm bell sounds, warning of danger - the Polovtsy are approaching Putivl. The boyars and the people defend their land against the enemy.

Scene 2
The Polovtsy gather together to pay homage to their mighty Khan. His forces have returned home laden with booty.
On hearing from them of the disaster which has overtaken his native Putivl, Igor desires to unite the Russian princes and acclaim them with passion. Now he is agree to escape with Ovlur.
Konchakovna rouses the sleeping camp and detains Vladimir; Igor manages to give his guards the slip. The angry khans demand Vladimir"s death, but Konchakovna won"t allow them to take him, and Konchak proclaims Vladimir his son-in-law.

Scene 3
Yaroslavna is lamenting her husband, having lost all hope she will ever see him again. Turning to the sun, the Dnieper, she demands them to tell her where Igor is, what fate has befallen him? Yaroslavna"s lament is echoed by that of the Russian peasants who are mourning their devastated native land.
Then the princess catches sight of two horsemen in the distance. It is Prince Igor and Ovlur. At long last her beloved husband has come home!
Skula and Yeroshka mock their captive prince. When they see Igor they are stunned. In order to avoid well-deserved punishment, the wiley Skula suggests to Yeroshka that they be the first to ring the church bells to inform the people of their prince"s return.
At the sound of the bells, the people come running to hear the news and joyfully greet Igor and the other princes who have arrived in Putivl, ready to unite and defend their land.

The Main Stage

Etudes. Carmen Suite (One act ballets)

Etudes. Carmen Suite (One act ballets)

Etudes
Ballet in one act
to music by Carl Czerny arranged and orchestrated by Knudage Riisager
Choreography by Harald Lander
Sceneries, costumes and lighting by Harald Lander
Ballet Masters: Lise Lander, Johnny Eliasen
Music Director: Igor Dronov
Will be premiered on March 19, 2017.

Carmen Suite
Ballet in one act
Adults only
to music by Georges Bizet and Rodion Shchedrin
Libretto Alberto Alonso based on the story Carmen by Prospero Merime
Choreographer: Alberto Alonso
Designer: Boris Messerer
Music Director: Pavel Sorokin
Assistant to Choreographer: Sonia Calero Alonso
Lighting designer: Alexander Rubtsov
For the first time entered the repertory of the Bolshoi Theatre on April 20, 1967.
Revived on November 18, 2005.

Running time: 50 minutes.

New Stage

Gala in Honor of Yuri Lyubimov Centennial Birth Anniversary

Etudes. Carmen Suite (One act ballets)

Etudes. Carmen Suite (One act ballets)

Etudes
Ballet in one act
to music by Carl Czerny arranged and orchestrated by Knudage Riisager
Choreography by Harald Lander
Sceneries, costumes and lighting by Harald Lander
Ballet Masters: Lise Lander, Johnny Eliasen
Music Director: Igor Dronov
Will be premiered on March 19, 2017.

Carmen Suite
Ballet in one act
Adults only
to music by Georges Bizet and Rodion Shchedrin
Libretto Alberto Alonso based on the story Carmen by Prospero Merime
Choreographer: Alberto Alonso
Designer: Boris Messerer
Music Director: Pavel Sorokin
Assistant to Choreographer: Sonia Calero Alonso
Lighting designer: Alexander Rubtsov
For the first time entered the repertory of the Bolshoi Theatre on April 20, 1967.
Revived on November 18, 2005.

Running time: 50 minutes.

New Stage

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