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A Legend of love (Ballet by Arif Melikov)

A Legend of love (Ballet by Arif Melikov)

Ballet in three acts
Libretto by Nazym Hikmet and Yuri Grigorovich
Choreographer: Yuri Grigorovich
Designer: Simon Virsaladze
Music Director: Alexander Kopylov
Assistant Choreographer: Natalia Bessmertnova
Lighting Designer: Mikhail Sokolov
Premiered on April 15, 1965.
Presented with two intervals.
Running time: 3 hours.

Synopsis

Act I
Scene 1
The royal apartments of Queen Mekhmene Banu are plunged in mourning - her young sister, Shireen, is dying. The Vizier and the courtiers are full of anxiety. Mekhmene Banu is in despair. A Stranger, who appears out of the blue, says he will cure the Princess but, in return, Mekhmene Banu must sacrifice her beauty. In order to save the life of her sister whom she loves deeply, Mekhmene Banu accepts the Stranger s cruel terms. Shireen is brought back to life.

Scene 2
In the palace garden, the young court painter, Ferkhad, suddenly comes across Queen Mekhmene Banu and Princess Shireen who are taking a walk, surrounded by courtiers and the palace guard. The two sisters exchange gazes with Ferkhad and love for the young painter is born in their hearts. The procession moves off. Ferkhad is entranced by the beauty of the young Shireen. In the hope of seeing Ferkhad, Shireen secretly returns to the garden The two young people are greatly attracted to each other.

Act II
Scene 3
Mekhmene Banu is overcome by passion for Ferkhad. Nothing can distract her thoughts from the handsome youth. She realizes in despair that now she has lost her beauty, she will be unable to win his love.

Scene 4
The young Shireen dreams of happiness with her loved one: the thought that they may soon meet gives her great joy and also fills her with anxiety. Ferkhad makes his way into Shireen s chamber and the lovers elope from the palace. Torn by jealousy, Mekhmene Banu orders that the lovers be seized. The fugitives are caught. The lovers pleas that they be granted their happiness are in vain. Mekhmene Banu sets Ferkhad an impossible task: in order to win Shireen, he must first bore a hole through the iron mountain which blocks the way to a water source. For the sake of his love, Ferkhad is willing to attempt the impossible. He bids farewell to Shireen.

Act III
Scene 5
The populace are tormented by thirst. As each day passes there is less and less water. And without water there can be no life. In order to attain water the mountain has to be destroyed.

Scene 6
Ferkhad, who is in the mountains, dreams that he has gained access to the water and before him he sees his beloved Shireen.

Scene 7
Mekhmene Banu is tormented by her passion and love for Ferkhad. She dreams she is beautiful again and that Ferkhad loves her. Shireen breaks into Mekhmene Banu s reveries. She implores her sister to recall Ferkhad.

Scene 8
A great hope has brought the populace to the mountains. If Ferkhad manages to accomplish the impossible, their lives will be saved. Queen Mekhmene Banu and Shireen appear surrounded by their suite. Overcome by happiness at their meeting, the lovers throw themselves into each other s arms. The Queen is prepared to give Ferkhad the hand of Shireen, but the former feels that he cannot go back on his duty. Mekhmene Banu and Shireen are full of respect for the great altruism of Ferkhad who is ready to sacrifice his personal happiness for the sake of his people.

Anna Karenina (Ballet by John Neumeier)

Anna Karenina (Ballet by John Neumeier)

Ballet in two acts
to music by Pyotr Tchaikovsky Alfred Shnitke, Cat Stevens / Yusuf Islam
Choreographer, Set and Costume Designer, Lighting Concept Author: John Neumeier
Video and Graphic: Kiran West
Music Director: Anton Grishanin
The Hamburg Ballet, The National Ballet of Canada and the Bolshoi Theatre coproduction
Will be premiered on 23 March 2018.

Das Rheingold (Sofia Opera and Ballet (Bulgaria) presents)

Das Rheingold (Sofia Opera and Ballet (Bulgaria) presents)

Richard Wagner
The prologue (preliminary evening) to the tetralogy Der Ring des Nibelungen in four scenes
Sofia Opera and Ballet (Bulgaria) presents
Music Director: Erich W?chter
Stage Director: Plamen Kartaloff
Designer: Nikolay Panayotov
Chorus Master: Violeta Dimitrova
Multimedia Director: Vera Petrova
Lighting Designers: Andrey Haydinyak, Emil Dinkov
Premiered on May 22, 2010 at the Sofia Opera and Ballet (Bulgaria)

Die Walkure (Sofia Opera and Ballet (Bulgary) presents)

Die Walkure (Sofia Opera and Ballet (Bulgary) presents)

Richard Wagner
The first day of the tetralogy Der Ring des Nibelungen in three acts
Sofia Opera and Ballet (Bulgary) presents
Music Director: Erich Wachter
Stage Director: Plamen Kartaloff
Designer: Nikolay Panayotov
Chorus Master: Violeta Dimitrova
Multimedia Director: Vera Petrova
Lighting Designers: Andrey Haydinyak, Emil Dinkov
Premiered in June 2010
at the Sofia Opera and Ballet (Bulgary)

Don Carlos (Opera by Giuseppe Verdi)

Don Carlos (Opera by Giuseppe Verdi)

Opera in four acts
Music Director: Vassily Sinaisky
Stage Director: Adrian Noble
Set Designer: Tobias Hoheisel
Costume Designer: Moritz Junge
Lighting Designer: Jean Kalman
Chorus Master: Valery Borisov
Permiered on December 17, 2013

In Honor of Giuseppe Verdi Bicentennial

SYNOPSIS

In 1556, the Emperor Charles V abdicated, celebrated his own funeral and retired to the monastery of San Jeronimo at Yuste. His son Philip II is now on the throne of Spain. To seal the peace between France and Spain after a long war, Philip marries Elisabeth of Valois, the daughter of Henry II, the French King, who has long been betrothed to his son Don Carlo.

ACT I

Scene 1
The cloister of the Yuste monastery

A Monk prays before the gates of the tomb of Charles V. Carlo starts at the sound of the voice - is this his grandfather, the Emperorn
Carlo s friend Rodrigo, the Marquis of Posa, joins him, and advises him to conquer his sorrow caused by losing his bride by a noble enterprise - that of freeing Flanders. The two vow to live and die together.

Scene 2
Outside the Yuste monastery gates

Outside the monastery, which no woman but the Queen may enter, her ladies while away the time with the song Princess Eboli sings.

The Queen enters, followed by Posa, who brings Elisabeth a letter from her mother and, under cover of the letter, a note from Carlo. While Eboli and Posa chat about the latest Paris fashions, Elisabeth reads the note, which tells her to trust Posa. In two broad strophes, Posa urges Elisabeth grant Carlo an interview, while Eboli (in asides) reveals her love for Carlo, and her hope that he loves her. Dismissing her ladies, Elisabeth consents to Posa s request. Carlo, at first controlled, asks Elisabeth to obtain the King s permission that he should leave for Flanders, but then his emotions overcome him and he falls to the ground in a swoon. On recovering, he clasps Elisabeth in his arms, defying the world. But she exclaims, "Then smite your father. Come stained with his murder, to lead your mother to the altar." Carlo runs off in despair.

Philip enters, angry to find the Queen unattended. Coldly he orders the lady-in-waiting who should have been with her to return to France. Elisabeth consoles her. The company leaves, but Philip orders Posa to remain: has he no favour to ask forn "Nothing for me," replies the Marquis, "but for others"; and, invited to speak freely, he describes the terror and destruction being wrought in Flanders. "At this bloody price," says Philip, "I have paid for the peace of the world." "The peace of a graveyard," Posa replies: one word from Philip could change the world and set people free. The King, struck by Posa s fearless honesty, confides to him his suspicions about his wife and his son, and appoints him his personal counsellor, but bids him beware the Grand Inquisitor.

ACT II

Scene 1
The Queen s gardens

Carlo enters, reading a note of midnight assignation which he believes has come from Elisabeth. When Eboli (who wrote the note) enters, masked, Carlo mistakes her for Elisabeth, and pours out his love. Too late, the mistake is revealed, and Eboli guesses his secret. Posa enters and tries to silence her, but in a tense trio she bids them beware the fury of a woman scorned. Posa asks Carlo to entrust to him any incriminating papers he may be carrying, and after a moment s hesitation - can he trust the King s new favouriten - Carlo does so.

Scene 2
A large square before the Basilica of Nuestra Senora de Atocha

The people gather to acclaim their King. Monks escort some Inquisition victims across the square; a splendid auto da fe, or public burning of heretics, is among the attractions of the day. Philip appears from the church and swears solemnly to serve God with fire and the sword. Suddenly a group of men cast themselves at his feet, and Carlo, who has led them there, announces that they are deputies from Flanders. The Flemings break into an eloquent plea for their country. Philip orders them to be taken away. All - except the monks - urge him to show mercy. At the close of the huge ensemble, Carlo asks his father to send him to Flanders as regent, and when Philip refuses, draws his sword on the King. No one dares to disarm him, until Posa steps forward. The King rewards Posa by making him a Duke, and the festive chorus is resumed.

ACT III

Scene 1
The King s study

Philip is alone in his study and reflects gloomily on his loveless, careworn life. The Grand Inquisitor is announced. Philip doubts whether he will be forgiven if he condemns his son to death; the Inquisitor demands that Posa should be handed over to the Inquisition. Philip refuses. The Inquisitor declares that Philip himself is in danger of being summoned before the Inquisition and leaves.

Elisabeth rushes in, distressed that her jewel casket has been stolen. Philip, who has it, opens it and draws out a portrait of Carlo. Elisabeth reminds him that she was once betrothed to the Prince, but he calls her an adulterous wife. She swoons. Eboli and Posa enter, and in a quartet Philip curses his unworthy suspicions, Eboli expresses her regret (for it was she who stole the casket), Posa decides that the time has come for him to take action, and Elisabeth, reviving, laments her unhappy life in this friendless country.

The two women are left alone. Eboli confesses that, drive by jealousy, she denounced Elisabeth to the King. At Eboli s further confession, that she has been Philip s mistress, Elisabeth tells her to choose, the following day, between exile and the veil, and leaves. Eboli curses the gift of fatal beauty that has caused her ruin. Her thoughts turn to Carlo, and she resolves to save him during the one day this is left to her.

Scene 2
Don Carlo s prison

Posa comes to bid Carlo farewell; he is marked for death, since Carlo s incriminating papers have been found on him - but Carlo can go free, to save Flanders. A shot is fired, and Posa falls. Quickly he explains that Elisabeth awaits Carlo at the Yuste cloister; he dies content, since by his death he secures the happy future of Spain. Philip enters, to return to Carlo his sword. A warning bell rings out; a crowd storms the prison, demanding the Prince. The tumult is quelled by the Grand Inquisitor, who orders the sacrilegious mob to fall on its knees before the King.

ACT IV

The Cloister at Yuste

Elisabeth invokes the spirit of the Emperor Charles: may he carry her prayers to the Eternal Throne. Carlo enters and declares that he is done with dreaming; now he will save Flanders. The two take a solemn farewell, hoping to meet in a better world: "And for ever! Farewell!" Philip and the Inquisitor have overheard them; the King delivers his son to the Inquisition. The gates of the Emperor s tomb open, and the Monk steps forth. He enfolds Carlo in his mantle and leads him into the cloister, recognized as Charles V by everyone present on stage.

Giselle (Ballet by Adolphe Adam. Production by Yuri Grigorovich)

Giselle (Ballet by Adolphe Adam. Production by Yuri Grigorovich)

Ballet in two acts Production by Yuri Grigorovich
Libretto by Theophile Gautier and Jean-Henry Saint-Georges
Choreography: Jean Coralli, Jules Perrot, Mauris Petipa
Choreographic version:Yuri Grigorovich
Designer: Simon Virsaladze
Music Director: Alexander Kopylov

SYNOPSIS

Act I
A small, peaceful village, bathed in sunlight. It is inhabited by simple, artless people. Giselle, a young peasant girl, is re joicing in the sun, the blue sky, the singing of the birds and, most of all, in the happiness of pure, trusting love which has lit up her life. She is in love and is confident that she is loved. The gamekeeper, who is in love with Giselle, tries in vain to per suade her that Albrecht, her loved one, is not a peasant at all but a nobleman in disguise and that he is deceiving her.
The gamekeeper manages to steal into the cottage which Albrecht is renting in the village and here he finds a silver sword with a coat of arms on it. Now the gamekeeper knows for sure that Albrecht is concealing his noble origins.
A party of distinguished noblemen, attended by a sumptuous suite, seek rest and refreshment in the village after the hunt. The peasants give their guests a cordial welcome.
Albrecht is embarrassed by this unexpected meeting: he tries to hide the fact he knows them for, in their company, is his betrothed, Bathilde. Meanwhile the gamekeeper shows everyone Albrecht s sword and, unmasking him, tells them of the latter s deceit. Giselle is shocked to the core by the perfidy of her loved one. The pure, crystal-clear world of her faith, hopes and dreams has been destroyed. She goes mad and dies.

Act II
Night-time. The ghostly forms of the Wilis, died brides, appear among the graves of the village church yard which is bathed in moonlight. "Dressed in bridal gowns and garlands of flow ers...The irresistibly beautiful Wilis danced to the light of the moon. And as they felt the time given them for dancing was running out and that they had again to return to their icy graves, their dancing became more and more impassioned and ra?pid..." (Heinrich Heine).
The Wilis catch sight of the gamekeeper who, suffering from pangs of con science, has come to visit Giselle s grave. At the command of Myrtha, the unrelenting Queen of the Wilis, the Wilis encircle the gamekeeper and make him dance until he drops lifeless, to the ground.
Albrecht too, is unable to forget Giselle. And, at dead of night, he co mes to her grave. The Wilis immedi ately encircle the youth. Albrecht is now threatened by the same horrify ing fate as the gamekeeper. But the shadow of Giselle now appears and her eternal and self-sacrificing love protects and saves Albrecht from the anger of the Wilis.
The ghostly, white forms of the Wilis vanish with the first rays of the rising sun. And Giselle s ethereal shadow va nishes too, but Giselle will always be alive in Albrecht s memory - the ever-present regret for a lost love, a love that is stronger than death.

Gotterdammerung (Sofia Opera and Ballet (Bulgary) presents)

Gotterdammerung (Sofia Opera and Ballet (Bulgary) presents)

Richard Wagner
The third day of the tetralogy Der Ring des Nibelungen in three acts with a prologue
Sofia Opera and Ballet (Bulgary) presents
Music Director: Erich Wachter
Stage Director: Plamen Kartaloff
Designer: Nikolay Panayotov
Chorus Master: Violeta Dimitrova
Multimedia Director: Vera Petrova
Lighting Designers: Andrey Haydinyak, Emil Dinkov
Premiered in 2013 at the Sofia Opera and Ballet (Bulgary)

Jewels (Ballet by George Balancine)

Jewels (Ballet by George Balancine)

Ballet by George Balancine in three parts.
Will be premiered at the Bolshoi Theatre on May 5, 2012.

Emeralds
to music by Gabriel Faure

Rubies
to music by Igor Stravinsky
The score has been made available by Boosey & Hawkes Music Publishers Limited

Diamonds
to music by Pyotr Tchaikovsky

Teachers-Repetiteurs: Sandra Jennings, Merrill Ashley, Paul Boos
Set Designer: Alyona Pikalova
Costume Designer: Elena Zaitseva
Music Director: Pavel Sorokin

La Bayadere (Ballet by Ludvig Minkus)

La Bayadere (Ballet by Ludvig Minkus)

Ballet in three acts.
Libretto by Marius Petipa and Sergei Khudekov
Choreography: Marius Petipa
New scenic version: Yuri Grigorovich
Scenes from productions by Vakhtang Chabukiani, Nikolai Zubkovsky, Konstantin Sergeyev used
Sets and costumes after sketches by designers of the first production (1877) revived by Valery Firsov,
Nikolai Sharonov (sets) and Nikolai Sviridchikov (costumes)
Supervisor of scenery and costumes revival: Valery Levental
Music Director: Alexander Kopylov

SYNOPSIS

Act I
Young warriors led by Solor are hunting a tiger. Before entering the forest Solor asks a fakir, named Magedavia, to tell Nikia, a bayadere, that he will wait for her near the temple.
The High Brahmin and priests are solemnly leaving the temple. The feast of worshipping fire begins. Fakirs and votaries of the temple, bayaderes, are performing sacred dances. Beautiful Nikia is among them. She adorns the festival.
Having forgotten about his ordination and vow of celibacy, the High Brahmin tells Nikia that he loves her and promises to place at her feet all the riches of India. Nikia rejects his wooing. She will never love him.
Nikia and other bayaderes give the fakirs water from the sacred pool. Imperceptibly Magedavia tells Nikia that Solor will come to see her. The bayadere is happy.
It is getting dark. Nikia comes to meet her beloved. Their secret rendezvous is guarded by the fakir. But the High Brahmin manages to overhear the conversation of the sweethearts.
Solor proposes that they elope. The bayadere agrees, but first she wants him to vow fidelity to her at the sacred fire. Solor takes the oath. The High Brahmin is infuriated. He appeals to the gods and demands punishment. His revenge will be terrible.
Next morning the rajah Dugmanta, head of the principality, tells his daughter Gamzatti that she will see her fiance that day.
The rajah sends for the fiance. It is the brave warrior Solor. The rajah shows Solor his beautiful daughter and proclaims them bride and groom. The warrior is struck by Gamzatti s beauty. But he remembers the bayadere, his vow to her, and is thrown into confusion.
It is time to hold the ceremony of consecrating Gamzatti's betrothal. Nikia is invited to the palace for the ceremony.
The High Brahmin arrives. He wants to tell the rajah a secret. Dugmanta sends everybody away. Gamzatti feels that the High Brahmin s arrival is somehow connected with her forthcoming marriage and eavesdrops on the Brahmin s conversation with her father.
The High Brahmin tells the rajah about Solor s love for Nikia. Dugmanta is infuriated but doesn t change his mind to give his daughter in marriage to Solor. The bayadere, who made Solor take the oath, must die.The High Brahmin who had wanted to get rid of his rival, didn t expect such a turn of events.
He threatens the rajah with punishment of the Gods for the bayadere s death. But the rajah is unrelenting.
Gamzatti orders her slave to bring Nikia. She sees that the bayadere is very beautiful and can be a dangerous rival. The rajah s daughter tells the bayadere about her forthcoming marriage and invites her to dance at the feast. She deliberately shows her the portrait of her fiance Solor. Nikia protests: Solor loves only her and he made a vow of eternal fidelity. The rajah s daughter demands that Nikia should give up Solor. But the bayadere would rather die than part with Solor. Gamzatti offers her jewels. Nikia throws them away with scorn. Nothing will make her part with her beloved. She raises her dagger in a rage. The slave stops her. But Gamzatti will never give her fiance back.

Act II
A sumptuous feast is being held on the occasion of Solor and Gamzatti s engagement. The bayadere Nikia is supposed to entertain the guests with dances. She can t hide her grief. Her eyes are fixed on her beloved Solor.
The fakir presents Nikia with a basket of flowers on behalf of Solor. The bayadere s dance is filled with happiness. But suddenly a snake crawls out of the flowers and bites her fatally.
Nikia realizes that the rajah s daughter is to blame for her death. The High Brahmin promises to save her life if she will love him. But the bayadere is faithful to her love for Solor. Nikia dies. Solor leaves the feast in despair.

Act III
Solor is inconsolable. He is gnawed by remorse. He enjoins the fakir to distract him from his grievous thoughts. Fascinated by the sacred dance, Solor sinks into the world of dreams.
Shadows appear to him out of the darkness. They are descending from mountains in a long file. Solor sees fair Nikia among them...
Solor comes out of his dazed state and hurries to the temple. He prays to the gods to forgive him. But it s too late. The infuriated gods punish Solor for his betrayal of love. Lightning and thunder destroy the temple. There is no more reality for Solor. He follows the shadow of fair Nikia...

Organ Music Concert "Festival Toccata"

Organ Music Concert "Festival Toccata"

Gala Concert to the Glatter-Gotz Bolshoi Theater organ" 5th anniversary

Part I

Antonio Vivaldi
Three fragments from Gloria, RV 589:

Gloria
Domine Deus, Agnus Dei
Domine Fili Unigenite

Sergei Vanin (countertenor)
Ludmila Khersonskaya (violin)
Pyotr Kondrachin (cello)
Alexei Korniliev (trumpet)
Gianluca Libertucci (organ)
The Chamber Choir of Moscow Сonservatory
Conductor: Alexander Soloviev

Georg Friedrich H?ndel
Aria of Serse "Ombra mai fu" from the opera Serse

Alexander Boldachev (harp)
Hiroko Inoue (organ)

Georg Friedrich Handel
Aria of Rinaldo "Or la tromba" from the opera Rinaldo

Sergei Vanin (countertenor)
Alexei Korniliev (trumpet)
Evgenia Krivitskaya (organ)

Alessandro Marcello - Johann Sabastian Bach
Adagio from Concerto for oboe and strings in D minor, BWV 974
Francesco Petrarca
Canzona from "In vita di Madonna Laura"

Pyotr Tataritsky (actor-reciter)
Ludmila Khersonskaya (violin)
Evgenia Krivitskaya (organ)

Johann Sabastian Bach
Toccata and Fugue in D minor, BWV 565

Baptiste Florian Marle-Ouvrard (organ)

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
"Ave verum corpus", KV 618

Bolshoi Theatre Children"s Choir
Baptiste Florian Marle-Ouvrard (organ)

Theodore Dubois
Toccata in G major from 12 Pi?ces pour orgue

Daniel Zaretsky (organ)

Vincenzo Bellini
Cavatina of Norma "Casta diva" from the opera Norma

Anastasia Barun (soprano)
Evgenia Krivitskaya (organ)
The Chamber Choir of Moscow Сonservatory
Conductor: Alexander Soloviev

Alexander Glazunov
Adagio from the ballet Raymonda

Choreography by Marius Petipa

Ludmila Khersonskaya (violin)
Evgenia Krivitskaya (organ)


Part II

Percy Fletcher
Festival Toccata

Gianluca Libertucci (organ)

Jules Massenet
Ave Maria on Meditation from the opera Tha?s

Svetlana Shilova (mezzo-soprano)
Ludmila Khersonskaya (violin)
Alexander Boldachev (harp)
Daniel Zaretsky (organ)

Gioacchino Rossini
Overture to the opera Guglielmo Tell

Transcription for organ

Hiroko Inoue (organ)

Camille Saint-Sa?ns
"The Swan" from the suite Le carnaval des animaux

Choreography by Mikhail Fokin

Pyotr Kondrachin (cello)
Alexander Boldachev (harp)
Evgenia Krivitskaya (organ)

Issei Tsukamoto
"Sakura" and "The Bird" from the opera The Stories about Princess Dzhoruri

Hiroko Inoue (organ)

Jean Langlais
"Epilogue for Pedal Solo" from Hommage a Frescobaldi

Daniel Zaretsky (organ)

Astor Piazzolla
Ave Maria
Anonimous 16th century
Christmas poem "And the Angel Took Me"

Ludmila Khersonskaya (violin)
Evgenia Krivitskaya (organ)
Pyotr Tataritsky (actor-reciter)

Cesar Franck
"Panis Angelicus"

Svetlana Shilova (mezzo-soprano)
Evgenia Krivitskaya (organ)
Bolshoi Theatre Children"s Choir

Charles-Marie Widor
Toccata from the Fifth Organ Symphony

Jean-Baptiste Dupont (organ)

Henry Purcell
Aria of Cold Genius "What Power Art Thou" from the opera King Arthur

Nino Rota
"A Time for Us"

Sergei Vanin (countertenor)
Ludmila Khersonskaya (violin)
Evgenia Krivitskaya (organ)

Giulio Caccini (Vladimir Vavilov) - Oleg Yanchenko
Ave Maria

Anastasia Barun (soprano)
Alexei Korniliev (trumpet)
Evgenia Krivitskaya (organ)
The Chamber Choir of Moscow Сonservatory
Conductor: Alexander Soloviev

Ballet soloists will be announced later

Romeo and Juliet (Ballet by Sergei Prokofiev)

Romeo and Juliet (Ballet by Sergei Prokofiev)

Ballet in two acts.
Libretto by Sergei Prokofiev, Sergei Radlov, Adrian Piotrovsky
after the play of the same name by William Shakespear in Yuri Grigorovich s version
Choreographer: Yuri Grigorovich
Scenery and Costumes by Simon Virsaladze
Music Director: Alexander Anikhanov
Lighting Designer: Mikhail Sokolov
Assistant Choreographer: Vasily Vorokhobko
Premiered at the Bolshoi Theatre on June 26, 1979.
Revival of the first production. Premiered on April 21, 2010.

Presented with one interval.

SYNOPSIS

Act l
Scene 1

A Square in Verona.
Brawl between the Montagues and Capulets.

Scene 2
A masked Romeo and Mercutio are on their way to the ball at the Capulets.

Scene 3
Juliet s Room. Preparations for the ball.

Scene 4
Ball at the Capulets.

Scene 5
The Capulets Garden.
First Meeting between Romeo and Juliet.

Act ll
Scene 1

A Square in Verona. Carnival.
Meeting between Mercutio and Tybalt.

Scene 2
Church.
Friar Lawrence marries Romeo and Juliet in secret.

Scene 3
A Square in Verona.
Quarrel, ending in a duel, between Mercutio and Tybalt.
Death of Mercutio.
Romeo s revenge and Tybalt s death
Lament for the Dead.

Scene 4
Juliet s Room.
The Lovers meet prior to their separation.
Paris woos Juliet.

Scene 5
Romeo s despair in banishment.

Scene 6
Friar Lawrence gives Juliet an opiate.

Scene 7
Juliet s Room.
Paris woos Juliet.
Juliet drinks the opiate.
Juliet s vision.

Scene 8
The house of the Capulets.
Paris morning Serenade.
News of Juliet s fictitious death.
The sad news puts an end to the wedding preparations.

Scene 9
The Capulet Vault Romeo s despair.
Romeo bids farewell to Juliet.
Death of the Lovers.

Siegfried (Sofia Opera and Ballet (Bulgaria) presents)

Siegfried (Sofia Opera and Ballet (Bulgaria) presents)

Richard Wagner
The second day of the tetralogy Der Ring des Nibelungen in three acts
Sofia Opera and Ballet (Bulgaria) presents
Music Director: Erich W?chter
Stage Director: Plamen Kartaloff
Designer: Nikolay Panayotov
Chorus Master: Violeta Dimitrova
Multimedia Director: Vera Petrova
Lighting Designers: Andrey Haydinyak, Emil Dinkov
Premiered in May 2012
at the Sofia Opera and Ballet (Bulgaria)

Spartacus (Ballet by Aram Khachaturyan)

Spartacus (Ballet by Aram Khachaturyan)

Ballet in 3 parts.
Libretto by Yuri Grigorovich after the novel of the same name by Raffaello Giovagnolli, ideas from the scenario by Nikolai Volkov used
Choreographer: Yuri Grigorovich
Designer: Simon Virsaladze
Music Director: Gennadi Rozhdestvensky
Premiered on April 9, 1968.
Presented with two intervals.
Running time: 3 hours 20 minutes.

SYNOPSIS

Act I
Scene 1
Invasion.

The military machine of imperial Rome, led by Crassus, wages a cruel campaign of conquest, destroying everything in its path. Among the chained prisoners, who are doomed to slavery, are Spartacus and Phrygia.

Spartacus'c Monologue.
Spartacus is in despair. Born a free man, he is now a slave in chains.

Scene 2
The Slave Market.

Slave dealers separate the men and women prisoners for sale to rich Romans. Spartacus is parted from Phrygia.

Phrygia's Monologue.
Phrygia is overcome with grief. She thinks with horror of the terrifying ordeals that lie ahead of her.

Scene 3
Orgy at Crassus's Palace.

Mimes and courtesans entertain the guests, making fun of Phrygia, Crassus's new slave. Aegina draws Crassus into a frenzied, bacchanalian dance. Drunk with wine and passion, Crassus demands a spectacle. Two gladiators are to fight to death in helmets with closed visors, i.e., without seeing each other. The victor's helmet is removed. It is Spartacus.

Spartacus'c Monologue.
Against his will, Spartacus has been forced to murder a fellow man. His despair develops into anger and protest. He will no longer tolerate captivity. He has but one choice of action - to win back his freedom.

Scene 4
The Gladiators' Barracks.

Spartacus incites the gladiators to revolt. They swear an oath of loyalty to him and, of one accord, break out of the barracks to freedom.

Act II
Scene 5
The Appian Way.

Having broken out of their captivity and finding themselves on Appian Way, surrounded by shepherds, Spartacus's followers call the latter to join the uprising. Shepherds and populace proclaim Spartacus as their leader.

Spartacus's Monologue.
The thought of Phrygia's fate as a slave gives Spartacus no peace. He is haunted by memories of his loved one whom he thinks of day and night.

Scene 6
Crasuss's Villa.

His search for Phrygia leads Spartacus to Crassus's villa. The two lovers are overjoyed at their reunion. But, due to the arrival of a procession of patricians, led by Aegina, they are forced to hide.

Aegina's Monologue. Aegina has long dreamed of seducing and gaining power over Crassus. Her goal is to win him and thereby gain legal admittance to the world of the Roman nobility.

Scene 7
Feast at Crasuss's Villa.

Crassus celebrates his victories. The patricians sing his praises. The festivities are cut short by an alarming piece of news: Spartacus and his min have all but surrounded the villa/ The panic-stricken guests disperse. Crassus and Aegina are also forced to flee. Spartacus breaks into the villa.

Spartacus's Monologue.
Victory! It elates him and fills him with faith that the uprising will be successful. Victory!

Scene 8
Spartacus's Victory
. Spartacus's men have taken Crassus prisoner and want to kill him, but Spartacus is not bent on revenge and suggests that they should engage in single-handed combat. Crassus accepts the challenge and suffers defeat: Spartacus knocks the sword out of his hand. Crassus makes ready demonstratively to meet his death, but Spartacus, with a gesture of contempt, lets him go. That all shall know of Crassus's dishonor is punishment enough. The jubilant insurgents praise the victory of Spartacus.

Act III
Scene 9
Crasuss Takes His Revenge.

Crassus is tormented by his disgrace. Fanning his hurt pride, Aegina calls on him to take his revenge. There is only one way forward - death to the insurgents. Crassus summons his legions. Aegina sees him off to battle.

Aegina's Monologue. Spartacus is Aegina's enemy too. The defeat of Crassus will be her downfall. Aegina devises a perfidious plan - she will sew dissension in Spartacus's encampment.

Scene 10
Spartacus's Encampment. Spartacus and Phrygia are happy to be together. But suddenly his military commanders bring the news that Crassus is on the move with a large army. Spartacus decides to give battle but, overcome by cowardice, some of his warriors desert their leader.

Scene 11
Dissension.

Aegina infiltrates the ranks of the traitors who, though they have abandoned Spartacus, might still be persuaded to go with him. Together with the courtesans she seduces the men with wine and erotic dances and, as a result, they put all caution to the winds. Having lured the traitors into a trap, Aegina hands them over to Crassus.

Spartacus's Monologue.
Crassus is consumed by the wish for revenge. Spartacus shall pay with his death for the humiliation that he, Crassus, was forced to undergo.

Scene 12
The Last Battle.

Spartacus's forces are surrounded by the Roman legions. Spartacus's devoted friends perish in unequal combat. Spartacus fights on fearlessly right up to the bitter end but, closing in on the wounded hero, the Roman soldiers crucify him on their spears.

Requiem.
Phrygia retrieves Spartacus's body from the battle field. She mourns her beloved, her grief is inconsolable. Raising her arms skywards, Phrygia appeals to the heavens that the memory of Spartacus live forever...

The Nutcracker (Ballet by Pyotr Tchaikovsky)

The Nutcracker (Ballet by Pyotr Tchaikovsky)

Ballet in two acts
Libretto by Yuri Grigorovich after the fairy-tale of the same name by Ernst Theodor Amadeus Hoffmann, ideas from the scenario by Marius Petipa used
Choreographer: Yuri Grigorovich
Designer: Simon Virsaladze
Music Director: Gennadi Rozhdestvensky

SYNOPSIS

Act I
Guests are gathering for a Christmas party at the Stahlbaum home. Among them are Drosselmeyer, godfather to Marie and Fritz, the Stahlbaums' children. He has brought them a wonderful present: a funny Nutcracker.
The children wait with impatience for when at long last they will be shown the Christmas tree and the presents. The long awaited moment comes: the handsomely adorned Christmas tree is presented to the assembled company.
Drosselmeyer suddenly appears disguised as a magician: he is not recognized by the children. Their unknown guest's ability to make their toys come alive delights the children but, as everything that is clad in mystery, it involuntarily arouses their fear. In order to calm them down, Drosselmeyer takes off his mask and the chil dren now recognize their beloved godfather. Marie wants to play with the wonderful dolls which have come alive, but they have already been tidied away. To comfort Marie, Drosselmeyer gives her the Nutcracker-Doll. Marie takes a great liking to this awkward, funny creature.
Marie's brother Fritz, who is a great tease and very naughty, acci dentally breaks the doll. With great tenderness, Marie comforts her injured Nutcracker and rocks it backwards and forwards. Fritz and his friends now put on mouse masks and tease poor Marie.
The guests appear from an adjoining room. After the final, ceremonial Grossvater dance, they all leave.
At night the room where the Christmas tree stands is bathed in moonlight. It looks mysterious and full of magical secrets. Overcoming her fears, Marie has come to the room to visit her ‘sick' Nutcracker-Doll. She kisses the doll and rocks it.
Drosselmeyer now appears. But instead of her kind godfather, he has turned into a wizard. At a wave of his hand everything around them is transformed: the walls of the room slide back, the Christmas tree starts to grow. And all the toys come alive and grow together with the tree.
Suddenly, mice creep out from under the floor boards, led by the Mouse King. The dolls are panic-stricken and thrown into confusion. The Nutcracker's quick wits and bravery save the day: lining up the lead soldiers, he boldly leads them out to do battle with the mice forces.
However, the forces are unequal, the advantage is on the side of the evil mice. The Nutcracker is left alone to face the Mouse King and his suite. Marie is out of her mind with worry over the danger that threatens her doll. At this very moment, Drosselmeyer hands her a lighted candle and she throws it at the mice who scurry away helter-skelter.
The battle field empties. The only person left here is the Nutcracker who lies without moving on the floor. Marie, together with the dolls, hurries to his rescue. And now a miracle occurs...Before Marie stands a handsome youth, the Nutcracker-Prince. He walks forward to meet her.
The walls of the house disappear. Marie and her friends are standing under a star-studded sky, by a fairy-tale Christmas tree. Snowflakes go round in a magical dance. Marie and her Nutcracker-Prince, beckon, as if to a beautiful dream, to the twinkling star at the top of the Christmas tree. They climb into a magic boat and set off for the top of the tree. The dolls follow behind them.

Act II
Marie and Nutcracker-Prince are sailing in their magic boat through the Christmas tree kingdom. There are their friends, the dolls with them. The shining star is getting closer and closer. They are just about to reach the top of the tree when they are suddenly attacked by the mice and the Mouse King who have crept up behind them. Once again, the Nutcracker-Prince goes boldly into battle. Horribly frightened, Marie and the dolls watch the fight. The Nutcracker-Prince vanquishes the enemy. Joyous victory celebrations are underway. The dolls dance, the candles burn even brighter, the Christmas tree comes alive. The evil mice have been defeated. Marie and the Nutcracker-Prince are radiant with happiness - they have reached the kingdom of their dreams! But it appears all this was just a dream. Christmas Eve is over and with it all wonderful reveries. Marie, still in the thrall of the fabulous dream, is sitting at home by the Christmas tree, with the Nutcracker-Doll on her lap.

The Queen of Spades (Opera by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky)

The Queen of Spades (Opera by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky)

Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky
Opera in three acts
Libretto by Modest Tchaikovsky after the novel of the same name by Alexander Pushkin
Music Director: Tugan Sokhiev
Stage Director: Rimas Tuminas
Set Designer: Adomas Jacovskis
Costume Designer: Maria Danilova
Director, Choreographer: Anzelica Cholina
Lightning Designer: Damir Ismagilov
Chief Chorus Master: Valery Borisov
Will be premiered on February 15, 2018.

SYNOPSIS
Act I

Scene 1

Petersburg. Strolling in the Summer Garden, Surin tells Chekalinsky about the previous night s gambling: as usual, Нerman had spent the whole night by the gaming table, gloomily following the game, but not taking part in it.

Нerman and Count Tomsky come into the garden. Нerman admits he is in love with a girl whose name he does not know even. He is afraid she is above him in station and therefore will prove beyond his reach.

Prince Yeletsky informs his friends that he is to get married. Нerman asks him about his betrothed. „There she is", Yeletsky replies, pointing to Liza who is in the company of the old Countess, known as The Queen of Spades. Gherman is in despair: for Liza is the very girl with whom he is in love.

„Happy day, I bless you!" Yeletsky says. „Unhappy day, I curse you!" Нerman exclaims.

Tomsky tells his friends that in her youth the Countess was a great beauty. A passionate gamblег, in Paris she had once lost everything at the gaming table. Count Saint-German had told the Moscow Venus the secret of three cards which had helped her win her fortune back. The Countess had been warned she would die at the hands of a man who, „impelled by despair", would come to her to demand the secret of the three cards.

Tomsky s story made a great impression on Нerman. The Summer Garden empties, a storm is about to break. All take shelter except Нerman who stands as if in a trance. He swears that if Liza does not become his, he will take his life.

Scene 2
Liza s room at the Countess house. Some girls of her own age have come to see Liza. Their merrymaking is interrupted by a stern housekeeper: the Countess is annoyed - it is already late and she cannot sleep because of the noise the girls are making. Left alone, Liza confides her secret to the night: she is in love with Herman.

Herman appears at the balcony doors. He declares his love to Liza. There is a loud knocking at the door. The old Countess has come to Liza s room herself to find out what the noise is about. Hiding, Herman remembers the legend of the three cards. Overcome by a burning desire to find out the secret of the winning cards, he immediately forgets his love for Liza. The Countess leaves the room and Gherman comes to his senses. He again tells Liza he loves her. She begs him to leave but, won over by the strength of his passion, she admits to reciprocating his feelings.

Act II
Scene 3

A ball given by a rich dignitary. Yeletsky notices that Liza is out of spirits and keeps questioning her as to the cause of her malaise. Liza avoids giving an explanation. The entreaties of her fiance to whom she is indifferent, leave her cold.

Liza gives Herman the key to a secret door into the Countess house: they must see each other. The way to Liza s room lies through the old woman s bedroom. It seems to Gherman that fate itself is helping him discover the secret of the three winning cards.

Scene 4

The Countess bedroom. Here everything is reminiscent of the distant youth of the Moscow Venus and Herman forgets why he has come. Possessed by the wish to find out the secret of the three cards, he decides to remain in the bedroom and make the Countess reveal it to him.

On her return from the ball, the Countess, having dismissed her maids and hangers on, remembers her youth and the marvelous balls in Paris. Herman suddenly appears and asks the Countess to reveal her secret to him. The old woman remains silent. Herman, threatening her with a pistol, repeats his request. The Countess dies....

Hearing the noise, Liza runs into the bedroom. Catching sight of the dead Countess, she exclaims in despair: „So it was the cards, not me you were after!"

Act III
Scene 5

Herman s quarters in the barracks. Herman is reading a letter from Liza in which she asks him to meet her on the embankment and give an explanation of his conduct. Herman is tormented by thoughts of the dead Countess. Against a background of the wailing wind and raging snowstorm outside, the old woman s ghost appears to Herman, who has gone out of his mind. She tells Herman he must marry Liza and that the secret of the three cards - Three, Seven and Ace - will be his.

Scene 6
The embankment of the Winter Canal. Dusk is falling fast. Liza is waiting for Herman hoping that he will dispel her suspicions that his murder of the Countess was premeditated. She waits a long time. Liza begins to lose hope and is ready to believe in Herman s villainy. But then Herman appears and for a brief moment it seems to them both that happiness may be possible, that all their sufferings are over. But, possessed by the thought of the three cards, Herman, half out of his mind, pushes Liza aside and runs off. Liza throws herself in the canal.

Scene 7
At the gambling house, the game is in full swing. Herman puts all his money on the three, the card named to him by the ghost, and wins. He doubles his stake. The second card, the seven, also brings him luck.

Herman, in very overwrought state, challenges anyone to stake once more. Yeletsky offers to play with him. But Gherman s third card turns out to be the Queen of Spades, not the ace. His card is trumped. Herman sees the ghost of the Countess. Gibbering with fear and rage he shoots himself.

The Snow Maiden (Opera by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov)

The Snow Maiden (Opera by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov)

Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov
Opera in four acts
Libretto by the composer based on the play of the same name by Alexander Ostrovsky
Music Director: Tugan Sokhiev
Stage Director: Alexander Titel
Designer: Vladimir Arefiev
Lighting Designer: Damir Ismagilov
Chorus Master: Valery Borisov
Will be premiered on June 15, 2017.

Un Ballo in Maschera

Un Ballo in Maschera

Opera in three acts
Giuseppe Verdi
Libretto by Antonio Somma based on the text by Augustin Eug?ne Scribe
Music Director: Giacomo Sagripanti
Director and Set Designer: Davide Livermore
Costume Designer: Mariana Fracasso
Lightning Designer: Antonio Castro
Chief Chorus Master: Valery Borisov
Video Design: D-wok
Will be premiered on April 20, 2018.

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