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Un Ballo in Maschera (Opera by Giuseppe Verdi)

Un Ballo in Maschera (Opera by Giuseppe Verdi)

Opera in three acts
Giuseppe Verdi
Libretto by Antonio Somma based on the text by Augustin Eug?ne Scribe
Music Director: Giacomo Sagripanti
Director and Set Designer: Davide Livermore
Costume Designer: Mariana Fracasso
Lightning Designer: Antonio Castro
Chief Chorus Master: Valery Borisov
Video Design: D-wok
Will be premiered on April 20, 2018.

Gayane (Ballet by Aram Khachaturyan)

Gayane (Ballet by Aram Khachaturyan)

"GAYANE" in the Bolshoi. Less than 60 years have passed!
Conductor - Konstantin Orbelian, Honored Artist of Russia, twice nominee for the Grammy Award, artistic director of the Academic Opera and Ballet Theater of Armenia. A. Spendiarov
Soloists: Sona Vardanyan and Honored Artist of Armenia Ruben Muradyan

2018 is full of significant events connected with Armenian statehood and culture!

This year marks the 115th anniversary of the greatest composer, Aram Ilyich Khachaturyan. Armenia also celebrates the 100th anniversary of the First Armenian Republic, and the ancient capital of Yerevan celebrates its 2800th anniversary!

Naturally, all these events were an excellent occasion for a number of events designed to present Armenian culture in Russia in all its splendor. Thanks to the active work of the Armenian Embassy in Russia, which, with the arrival of the new ambassador, Vartan Toganian in 2017, began to pay special attention to the development of cultural and humanitarian ties between the two countries, after a break of almost 60 years, Moscow will see the ballet "Gayane" by Khachaturian at the historic stage of the Bolshoi Theater of Russia! Stunningly colorful scenery and costumes, restored according to the sketches of the great artist Minas Avetisyan, will come from Yerevan together with the ballet and the magnificent orchestra under the direction of the Honored Artist of Russia, twice the nominee of the Grammy Award - Konstantin Orbelian! ..
July 24, on the historical stage of the Bolshoi, will be the only performance dedicated to the anniversary of the great composer AI. Khachaturian and the 100th anniversary of the First Republic of Armenia! The ballet will be attended by the President of Armenia and many Russian officials.

The last time the ballet "Gayane" was staged at the Bolshoi Theater 57 years ago - in February 1961.

Don Quixote (Ballet by Marius Petipa, Alexander Gorsky. Ludwig Minkus)

Don Quixote (Ballet by Marius Petipa, Alexander Gorsky. Ludwig Minkus)

Ludwig Minkus
Libretto by Marius Petipa after the novel of the same name by Miguel de Cervantes
Choreography: Marius Petipa, Alexander Gorsky
New choreographic version: Alexei Fadeyechev
Music Director: Pavel Sorokin
Designer: Valery Leventhal
Costume Designer: Elena Zaitseva
Lighting Designer: Damir Ismagilov
Executive Designer: Olga Medvedeva
Use is made in the production of choreography by Rostislav Zakharov (Dance with Guitars and Jig to music by V. Soloviev-Sedoy); by Kasiyan Goleizovsky (Gipsy Dance to music by V. Zhelobinsky); by Anatoly Simachev (Fandango to music by E. Napravnik).
Will be premiered February 2, 2016.

SYNOPSIS

Prologue
Don Quixote, having read his fill of romances about knights and chivalry, decides to set off on his travels in order to achieve great feats, which willbring glory to his name. As his sword-bearer, he chooses the loyal Sancho Panza, a man of sober outlook who is not prone to dreams.

Act I
In Barcelona there is festive anima?tion in the air. Kitri, daughter of the innkeeper, is flirting with Basilio, the barber, who is in love with her.Finding them together Lorenzo, Kitri s father, chases Basilio away: the barber is no fit match for his daughter. Lorenzo intends Kitri to marry Gamache, a rich noble?man. Kitri refuses outright tosubmit to her father s will.

At the height of the merry-making, Don Quixote appears in the square, accompanied by his sword bearer, Sancho Panza. Catching sight of the innkeeper, Don Quixote mistakes him for the owner of aknight s castle and greets him with respect. Lorenzo responds in like terms and invites Don Quixote into the inn. Sancho Panza is left in the square. But when some young people start to mock Sancho,Don Quixote immediately hurries to his sword-bearer s rescue.

Seeing Kitri, Don Quixote thinks she is the beautiful Dulcinea whom he has seen in his dreams and chosen as the lady of his heart . But Kitri disappears. She has run off with Basilio. Lorenzo,Gamache and Don Quixote set out to look for her.

Act II
Scene 1

Kitri and Basilio are hiding in a tavern. Here they are found by Lorenzo, Gamache and Don Quixote. Lorenzowishes to make an immediate announce?ment of the betrothal of Kitri and Gamache. But Basilio, by agreement with Kitri, pretends to take his life. Kitri sobs over the body of her sweetheart. DonQuixote overcоme by noble indignation accuses Lorenzo of hardheartedness and, threatening him with his sword forces him to agree to his daughter s marriage with the barber Basilio jumps to his feet.There is no point in him pretending to be dead am longer.

Scene 2
In the glade by the windmills is a sprawling gipsy encampment. Here too is a puppet theatre. Don Quixote and Sancho soon appear on the scene. The ownerof the puppet theatre invites Don Quixote to watch a show. Don Quixote follows the performance with rapt attention and, forgetting it is theatre, rushes on to the stage, sword in hand, to defendthose who need his protection. He breaks down the stage, sends the puppets flying and, catching sight of the windmills, mistakes them for evil magicians whom he has to get the better of. Grabbing amill sail, he is first lifted into the air and then falls to the ground.

Scene 3
The wounded Don Quixote and Sancho Panza find themselves in a forest. To Don Quixote, the forest seems to be full of monsters and giants. Sancho Panzasettles Don Quixote down to sleep, while he runs off for help. In his dreams, Don Quixote sees Dulcinea, the lady of his heart , surrounded by Dryads and fairies Sancho Panza comes back with theDuke and Duchess who have been hunting in the forest. He begs them to help the dreaming Don Quixote. The Duke and Duchess invite the wandering knight to visit them m their castle.

Act III
The Duke s castle. All is ready for the reception of Don Quixote.
Having heard from Sancho Panza the happy story of Kitri and Basilio s love, the Duke and Duchess have kindly agreed to allow them to hold their wedding in the castle. Don Quixote and Sancho Panza areinvited to occupy the seats of honor. A solemn procession files past. Catching sight of Kitri, Don Quixote again mis?takes her for the lady of his reveries . But the Duke and Sancho Panza manage topersuade him that she is the very same innkeeper s daughter whom he helped to unite with Basilio, her sweetheart.
The festivities continue. All thank the va?liant knight and his faithful sword-bearer.

La Fille du Pharaon (Ballet by Cesare Pugni)

La Fille du Pharaon (Ballet by Cesare Pugni)

Ballet in three acts.
Libretto by Jean-Henry Saint-Georges and Maurice Petipa after the story Le roman de la momie by Theophile Gautier, version by Pierre Lacotte.
Author of the score s version - Yuri Poteyenko.
Choreographer - Pierre Lacotte (after the ballet of the same name by Marius Petipa).
Designer - Pierre Lacotte.
Music Director - Alexander Sotnikov.
Premiered on May 5, 2000.
Presented with two intervals.
Running time: 2 hours 55 minutes.

SYNOPSIS

Act I
Scene 1

A young Englishman, Lord Wilson, is traveling through Egypt with his servant, John Bull. At the foot of a pyramid they meet a caravan of Arab merchants who kindly invite them into their tent.
Suddenly, a very powerful storm gets up and the travelers and merchants hurry to take shelter in the nearest pyramid.

Scene 2
The caretaker of the pyramid requests his uninvited guests not to make a noise and points to a tomb right at the back of the pyramid; in it lies Aspicia, the daughter of one of Egypt s most powerful Pharaohs.
Settling down in a corner of the pyramid, the Arab merchants light up their opium pipes. Lord Wilson also asks for a chibouk... He falls asleep and soon all are wreathed in a light cloud of smoke.
Fantastic dreams now take form: the walls of the sepulchre disappear and the mummies come to life and leave their sarcophagi. After them comes Aspicia, their mistress, and daughter of the mighty Pharaoh. Bending over the Englishman, she lays her hand on his heart. At that very minute, a magical metamorphosis takes place: Lord Wilson and his servant become Egyptians. The former is called Taor, the latter - Passiphonte.
Enchanted by Aspicia s beauty, Taor tries to follow her but the princess disappears in a limpid haze.

Scene 3
Taor, and his servant Passiphonte, hurry off to the forest in search of Aspicia. They find her by a miracle, sleeping on a moss-covered rock. Nearby are her attendants, who are worn out by the intense heat.
Taor cautiously walks up to the Princess and places his hand on her heart. Aspicia wakes up and recognizes the handsome youth. Oblivious to everything around them, they gaze at each other.
In the distance, hunting horns can be heard. Aspicia asks Taor to hide. Ramze, her slave, who has noticed the stranger, tries to persuade her mistress to leave. The hunters appear and warn Aspicia that there is a lion in the forest: Aspicia goes off with the hunters in pursuit of the lion. The lion is surrounded but, suddenly, he breaks out of the ring of hunters and makes for the Princess. Taor who, from his hiding place, is following the scene with horror, seizes a bow, left behind by one of the hunters, and neatly lodges an arrow right in the lion s heart. Aspicia is saved. She loses consciousness but Taor catches her before she falls and carries her off to a place of safety.
A fanfare of trumpets announces that the Pharaoh and his suite are approaching. Seeing his daughter in the arms of a stranger, the Pharaoh gives orders that the latter should be arrested. Coming to, Aspicia tells her father that Taor has saved her life and should be rewarded. The Pharaoh s rage turns to gratitude. He orders that the youth be freed and invites him to his palace.

Act II
Scene 4

Taor visits Aspicia in her sumptuous apartments and declares to her his love. The Pharaoh enters, surrounded by a brilliant suite of dignitaries and palace officials. They are followed by the King of Nubia who has come to ask for the hand of the Pharaoh s daughter. The Egyptian potentate agrees to give his daughter in marriage to the King of Nubia and the two men sign a treaty of friendship.
Hearing of this, Taor is out of his mind with despair. Aspicia tries to calm him down and promises she will never belong to anyone except him.
The Pharaoh commands that the festivities to mark his daughter s wedding should start. Full of sadness, Taor reminds Aspicia that soon she is to marry the King of Nubia. They decide to run away.
At the height of the festivities, Taor is handed the key to a secret door through which the couple make their escape from the palace.
The Pharaoh is furious when he hears of his daughter s disappearance, and orders that the runaway couple should be apprehended. Noticing the secret door, the King of Nubia sets off, together with his bodyguards, in pursuit of Taor and Aspicia.

Act III
Scene 5

Taor and Aspicia are hiding in a fisherman s hut on the banks of the Nile. At nightfall, the fishermen get ready to go fishing and invite their guests to come too. Aspicia, who is tired, decides not to go. Taor advises her to rest and goes off with the fishermen.
No sooner has he departed, than the King of Nubia, accompanied by his bodyguards, enters the hut. Aspicia is only too well aware that her marriage to the King of Nubia will separate her forever from the man she loves. Therefore, to avoid being caught, she runs over to the window and throws herself into the Nile.
Meanwhile, Taor and Passiphonte come back into the hut. The King of Nubia orders that they should be seized and threatens them with revenge for having abducted Aspicia.

Scene 6
The mighty God of the River Nile, the ruler of the underworld, gives Aspicia a warm welcome and recognizes her to be the daughter of the great Egyptian Pharaoh. But the young Princess has only one request - she wants to see Taor again. The God of the Nile fulfils her wish. In answer to his command Taor appears now at the top of a cliff, now in the limpid waters of waterfall. Longing to be reunited with her love one, Aspicia begs the ruler of the Nile to return her to dry land. The Nile God does as she bids.

Scene 7
The Pharaoh s palace. The ruler of Egypt is in despair. He demands that Taor be brought into his presence and threatens to kill him if the latter does not tell him where Aspicia is hiding. But Taor has no idea where the Princess is.
So the Pharaoh commands that the youth be condemned to death: he is to be bitten by a sacred snake. But at this very moment, the sounds of a joyful march can be heard in the distance: the fishermen have found Aspicia and are bringing her back to the palace.
The Princess throws herself into her father s arms and tells him of her adventures, of her love for Taor and of how the King of Nubia threatened her and forced her to jump into the river. The Pharaoh tears up the treaty of friendship with the King of Nubia, and orders the latter to leave. Aspicia begs her father to give Taor his freedom, but the Pharaoh will not hear of it: he cannot forgive Taor for abducting his daughter. So then Aspicia declares that she is ready to die together with her loved one. And, going up to the sacred snake, she holds out her hand so that it will bite her. The Pharaoh rushes over to his daughter and holds her back. Touched by Aspicia s selflessness and the depth of her feeling, he forgives Taor and gives his blessing to the young couple. At the height of the general rejoicing, the stage is enveloped in clouds.

Scene 8
In place of the palace, a pyramid now appears again. Lord Wilson wakes up and looks round him in astonishment. In the far corner of the pyramid, he notices the tomb of the Pharaoh s daughter. His face lights up with a radiant smile as he remembers the wonderful dream he has just had.

Giselle (Ballet by Adolphe Adam. Production by Yuri Grigorovich)

Giselle (Ballet by Adolphe Adam. Production by Yuri Grigorovich)

Ballet in two acts Production by Yuri Grigorovich
Libretto by Theophile Gautier and Jean-Henry Saint-Georges
Choreography: Jean Coralli, Jules Perrot, Mauris Petipa
Choreographic version:Yuri Grigorovich
Designer: Simon Virsaladze
Music Director: Alexander Kopylov

SYNOPSIS

Act I
A small, peaceful village, bathed in sunlight. It is inhabited by simple, artless people. Giselle, a young peasant girl, is re joicing in the sun, the blue sky, the singing of the birds and, most of all, in the happiness of pure, trusting love which has lit up her life. She is in love and is confident that she is loved. The gamekeeper, who is in love with Giselle, tries in vain to per suade her that Albrecht, her loved one, is not a peasant at all but a nobleman in disguise and that he is deceiving her.
The gamekeeper manages to steal into the cottage which Albrecht is renting in the village and here he finds a silver sword with a coat of arms on it. Now the gamekeeper knows for sure that Albrecht is concealing his noble origins.
A party of distinguished noblemen, attended by a sumptuous suite, seek rest and refreshment in the village after the hunt. The peasants give their guests a cordial welcome.
Albrecht is embarrassed by this unexpected meeting: he tries to hide the fact he knows them for, in their company, is his betrothed, Bathilde. Meanwhile the gamekeeper shows everyone Albrecht s sword and, unmasking him, tells them of the latter s deceit. Giselle is shocked to the core by the perfidy of her loved one. The pure, crystal-clear world of her faith, hopes and dreams has been destroyed. She goes mad and dies.

Act II
Night-time. The ghostly forms of the Wilis, died brides, appear among the graves of the village church yard which is bathed in moonlight. "Dressed in bridal gowns and garlands of flow ers...The irresistibly beautiful Wilis danced to the light of the moon. And as they felt the time given them for dancing was running out and that they had again to return to their icy graves, their dancing became more and more impassioned and ra?pid..." (Heinrich Heine).
The Wilis catch sight of the gamekeeper who, suffering from pangs of con science, has come to visit Giselle s grave. At the command of Myrtha, the unrelenting Queen of the Wilis, the Wilis encircle the gamekeeper and make him dance until he drops lifeless, to the ground.
Albrecht too, is unable to forget Giselle. And, at dead of night, he co mes to her grave. The Wilis immedi ately encircle the youth. Albrecht is now threatened by the same horrify ing fate as the gamekeeper. But the shadow of Giselle now appears and her eternal and self-sacrificing love protects and saves Albrecht from the anger of the Wilis.
The ghostly, white forms of the Wilis vanish with the first rays of the rising sun. And Giselle s ethereal shadow va nishes too, but Giselle will always be alive in Albrecht s memory - the ever-present regret for a lost love, a love that is stronger than death.

Candide (Operetta in two acts. Theatrical concert performance)

Candide (Operetta in two acts. Theatrical concert performance)

Leonard Bernstein
Operetta in two acts
Theatrical concert performance
Sang in English with Russian dialogs (translation by Ekaterina Baburina).
The score has been made available by Boosey & Hawkes Music Publishers Limited.
In commemoration of the composer centennary

Book by Hugh Wheeler after Voltaire, Lyrics by Richard Wilbur,
with additional lyrics by Stephen Sondheim, John La Touche, Lillian Hellman, Dorothy Parker
and Leonard Bernstein.

Orchestrations by Leonard Bernstein and Hershy Kay.
Musical continuity and additional orchestrations by John Mauceri,

with a narration for concert version by Leonard Bernstein and John Wells, adapted from the satire by Voltaire and the book by Hugh Wheeler; edited and supplemented by Erik Haagensen.

Music Director: Tugan Sokhiev
Stage Director: Alexei Frandetti
Set Designer: Timofei Ryabushinsky
Costume Designer: Victoria Sevryukova
Chief Chorus Master: Valery Borisov

The Tzars Bride (Opera by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov)

The Tzars Bride (Opera by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov)

Opera in four acts
Libretto by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov and Ilya Tyumenev
based on Lev Mey s play of the same name
Music Director: Vassily Sinaisky
Stage Director: Julia Pevzner
Set Designer: Alyona Pikalova
Costume Designer: Elena Zaitseva
Lighting Designer: Damir Ismagilov
Chorus Master: Valery Borisov
Choreographer: Ekaterina Mironova
Will be premiered on February 22, 2014.

SYNOPSIS

Act I
The Carousal
Chamber in Oprichnik Grigory Gryaznoy s house. Grigory is plunged in deep thought. He has fallen passionately in love with Marfa, daughter of the merchant Sobakin, but she is already betrothed to the young boyar, Ivan Lykov. In order to put his love out of his mind, Grigory decides to organize a drinking-party. One of his guests is the Tsar s foreign physi?cian, Bomelius; Gryaznoy has an important matter to discuss with him.

His guests start arriving: the oprichniks led by Malyuta Skuratov, Gryaznoy s friend, Ivan Lykov and the long-awaited Yelisey Bomelius. Lykov tells the assembled company of the for?eign parts from whence he has recently returned. Psaltery players and singers entertain the guests with songs and dancing. The guests sing the praises of their sovereign, Ivan the Terrible.

During the revelries, Malyuta mentions Lyubasha. "Who is Lyubasha?" Bomelius asks. "Gryaznoy s mistress, a right bonny lass!" Malyuta replies. Gryaznoy calls Lyubasha and, at Malyuta s request, she sings a song about the bitter fate of a girl who is forced to marry a man she doesn t love. The carousal comes to an end and the guests depart. Gryaznoy detains Bomelius. Lyubasha, sensing that something is wrong, hides and listens to their conversation. Graznoy asks Bomelius for a love potion. The physician promises to provide him with a powder which has the power to arouse love in a girl s heart. After Bomelius has gone, Lyubasha accuses Grigory of having fallen out of love with her. But Grigory doesn t listen. He can think of nothing else but his passion for Marfa. The bells sound for the early morning service. Grigory departs leaving Lyubasha alone with her despair. She cannot live without Grigory s love. Lyubasha vows she will seek out the girl who is the cause other troubles and bewitch her away from Gryaznoy.

Act II
The Love Potion
A street in the Alexandrov sloboda. The parishioners are coming out of the monastery after the evening service. The oprichniks turn up: they are concocting some new mischief against the boyars. The common people try to keep out of their way: they fear both the boyars and the oprichniks, loyal servants to the stern Tsar.

Marfa, accompanied by Dunyasha and Petrovna, the house?keeper, come out of the monastery gates. At the porch of her house, Marfa stands talking to her friend other betrothed, Ivan Lykov. Suddenly someone in a black monk s cassock and skull?cap appears through the monastery gates and walks slowly along the street. Marfa s eyes meet those of the monk. She doesn t rec?ognize Ivan the Terrible but the stranger s intent gaze frightens her. It is only when she catches sight of her father and her betrothed, who are approaching the house, that she calms down and forgets her weird encounter. Sobakin invites Lykin into the house and the girls follow them in. Dusk is falling. A shadow is circling round the Sobakin house. It is Lyubasha. She cautiously steals up to the porch: she wants to have a look at her rival. Having peeped through the lit-up win?dow, Dunyasha clams down: "Is that Marfa? There is no need for me to worry then, Grigory will soon tire other!" But, peep?ing again through the window, Dunyasha realizes she has mis?taken Dunyasha for Marfa. Dunyasha is struck by Marfa s beau?ty. "He won t fall out of love with her in a hurry. I ll soon show her, though!"

Out of her mind with despair, Lyubasha rushes to Bomelius s house. Bomelius appears in answer to her call. Lyubasha begs him to sell her a potion which will destroy human beauty. Bomelius agrees, demanding in return Lyubasha s love. Indignant, Lyubasha wants to leave, but Bomelius threatens to tell Gryaznoy what she has asked him for.

The sound of Marfa s laughter coming from the Sobakins house, makes Lyubasha agree to Bomelius s terms. Bomelius goes off to mix the potion, leaving Lyubasha alone with her oppressive thoughts. At this point, Lykov leaves the Sobakin household accompanied by the master of the house. Learning from their conversation that Grigory is expected at Marfa s home the next day, Lyubasha renews her pleas for a potion: Bomelius has now reappeared. Bomelius tries to drag the des?perate girl into his house, but the sound of the oprichniks singing in the distance stays his hand. Lyubasha is about to rush towards the oprichniks, where she will find Grigory, when she remembers he no longer loves her and comes to a halt. Bomelius hides by the door, waiting for Lyubasha. Lyubasha forces herself to go to the physician. She feels as if she is going to her execution. The oprichniks appear in the street. Led by Malyuta, they are on their way to massacre the seditious boyars. The light goes out in Bomelius house.

Act III
Druzhka
Chamber in Merchant Sobakin s house. Sobakin tells Ivan Lykov and Gryaznoy that Marfa, together with Dunyasha and the boyars daughters, have been summoned to the palace for the Tsar intends to choose himself a bride. This alarms both Lykov and Gryaznoy. Sobakin tries to calm down Lykov. Echoing Sobakin s sentiments, Gryaznoy sug?gests he be druzhka (one of the participants, representing the bride?groom, in the old wedding rites) at Lykov s wedding. But as he congratu?lates Lykov, there is a mocking intonation in his voice. Domna Saburova, Dunyasha s mother, appears. She describes how the ceremony for choosing the Tsar s bride went. The Tsar hardly glanced in Marfa s direction, but he paid Dunyasha a lot of attention, joking and talking with her. Lykov sighs with relief.

Grigory fills two goblets, he intends to drink a toast to the bride and bridegroom. Unnoticed, he pours the powder that Bomelius has given him into Marfa s goblet - the love potion. As soon as Marfa, who has returned from the palace together with Dunyasha, enters the room, Grigory congratulates the couple and gives then each a goblet. In accordance with tradition, Marfa drinks her goblet dry. Everyone congratulates Marfa and Lykov. Saburova strikes up a song in honor of the bride in which the latter s friends join in.

Suddenly, Petrovna rushes into the room and falls at Sobakin s feet. "The boyars are on their way to you bearing a message from the Tsar!" "To me? You are out о your mind, woman!" Sobakin exclaims.

Malyuta appears with the boyars and proclaims the Tsar s will - Marfa is to be his wife.

Act IV
The Bride
The Tsar s chamber where Marfa, the Tsar s bride, is now living preparatory to her wedding. An unknown ailment afflicts her. Bitter fears for his daughter give Sobakin no peace. Domna Saburova tries in vain to allay his anxiety. Gryaznoy appears: "The person responsible has confessed to everything and the Tsar s foreign physician has promised to cure her ailment", he tells Sobakin. Sobakin has no idea who this person is. He makes haste to tell his daughter what he has heard. Marfa, at her wits end, runs into the chamber. She realizes that Lykov has been blamed for her ailment, trying to save him, she pretends to feel quite well again. "I m quite well, I m quite well", she says in an agitated voice. But Gryaznoy replies that the Tsar had ordered the execution of Lykov who, according to Gryaznoy, had confessed to giving Marfa a potion, and that he, Gryaznoy, with his own hands had carried out the sentence. Learning of the death of her beloved, Marfa falls unconscious to the floor.

On coming to, Marfa recognizes no one. Mistaking Gryaznoy for Lykov, she converses tenderly with him, recalling the happy hours they have spent together. Shaken by Marfa s words, Gryaznoy admits that he had slandered Lykov and that he, him?self, and given Marfa the love potion. But Marfa doesn t hear him, all her thoughts are in the past. She again recalls her childhood, spent in Novgorod, and her betrothed. Gryaznoy is in despair. But before giving himself up into the hands of the oprichniks, he wants to "have things out with" Bomelius who deceived him. "You d better have things out with me", says Lyubasha who has appeared on the scene. And she tells Grigory how she had substituted poison for the love potion Bomelius had given Grigory and which Grigory had then given Marfa. Grigory kills Lyubasha by plunging his knife into her heart. Grigory bids farewell to Marfa and gives himself up to the oprichniks and Malyuta. But Marfa sees and hears nothing. All her thoughts are in the past, with Lykov. She dies with his name on her lips.

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