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Alcina (Opera by Georg Friedrich Handel)

Alcina (Opera by Georg Friedrich Handel)

Opera in two acts
Georg Friedrich Handel
Libretto by anonymous author after the libretto by Antonio Marchi Alcina delusa da Ruggiero inspired by Ludovico Ariosto s Orlando furioso
Music Director: Andrea Marcon
Director: Katie Mitchell
Premiered on October 18, 2017
Co-production with Festival international d art lyrique d Aix-en-Provence (France)

Synopsis
With no news from her fiance Ruggiero, the valiant Bradamante has decided to search for him in the guise of her own brother Ricciardo, accompanied by Ruggiero"s former tutor Melisso.

ACT I
Bradamante and Melisso land on the enchanted island of the magician Alcina where they are welcomed by Alcina"s sister, Morgana, who immediately falls under the spell of the imposter Ricciardo. Ruggiero appears next with Alcina, bewitched by her charms. The young Oberto then enters: he is in search of his father, who has also fallen under the spell of the magician. Blinded by Alcina"s love, Ruggiero refuses to recognize his fiancee under the clothes of Ricciardo, ignoring Melisso"s warnings. Jealous of the imposter Ricciardo, Oronte, the would-be suitor of Morgana, makes Ruggiero believe that Alcina has fallen for Ricciardo, which triggers the ire of the young man. He then suggests to his mistress that she pushes away this rival by saving for him the same fate as the other men detained here: he asks her to transform him into a beast or a plant! Morgana hastens to warn Ricciardo who, in light of the situation, sees no other choice but to feign love for the young woman.
Melisso manages to bring Ruggiero back to reality. But when Bradamante appears, Ruggiero thinks it is a false apparition created by Alcina, and he rebuffs his fiancee. Just as Alcina is about to transform Ricciardo into a wild beast, she is stopped in mid-action by Morgana then by Ruggiero. Then, Ruggiero pretends to want to go hunting. Alcina authorizes him to leave. She promises Oberto that he will see his father again soon. Oronte then comes to announce the escape of Ruggiero and Ricciardo. Alcina collapses.
Now that he has revealed Ricciardo"s treason, Oronte thinks he can win back Morgana"s love. As for Alcina, betrayed, she invokes infernal powers to take her vengeance, but they no longer respond to her call.

ACT II
Repentant, Morgana draws close to Oronte. Alcina, desperate, tries to keep Ruggiero from escaping, but he proves determined to leave her. Bradamante, Ruggiero, and Melisso agree to reduce Alcina"s palace to rubble and return the magician"s former lovers to their human form. When Bradamante shatters the spells, Alcina and Morgana lose their power, while the animals and plants, including Oberto"s father, take back their human form.

Artifact suite. Petrushka (One act ballets)

Artifact suite. Petrushka (One act ballets)

One act ballets

Artifact suite
To music by Eva Crossman-Hecht and Johann Sebastian Bach
Ballet in one act
Choreography, Costume and Lighting Design: William Forsythe
The world premiere took place in Scottish National Ballet Glasgow on September 15, 2004.
Will be premiered on November 20, 2018.

Petrushka
Igor Stravinsky
Ballet in one act
Choreagraphy: Edward Clug
Set Design: Marko Japelj
Costume Design: Leo Kula?
Lightign Design: Martin Gebhardt
Will be premiered on November 20, 2018.

Carmen Suite. Etudes. Forgotten Land (One act ballets)

Carmen Suite. Etudes. Forgotten Land (One act ballets)

Carmen Suite
to music by Georges Bizet and Rodion Shchedrin
Ballet in one act
Adults only
Libretto Alberto Alonso based on the story Carmen by Prospero Merime
Choreographer: Alberto Alonso
Designer: Boris Messerer
Music Director: Pavel Sorokin
Assistant to Choreographer: Sonia Calero Alonso
Lighting designer: Alexander Rubtsov
For the first time entered the repertory of the Bolshoi Theatre on April 20, 1967.
Revived on November 18, 2005.

Running time: 50 minutes.

Etudes
to music by Carl Czerny arranged and orchestrated by Knudage Riisager
Ballet in one act
Choreography by Harald Lander
Sceneries, costumes and lighting by Harald Lander
Ballet Masters: Lise Lander, Johnny Eliasen
Music Director: Igor Dronov
Premiered on March 19, 2017.

Forgotten Land
To music of Sinfonia da requiem by Benjamin Britten
Ballet in one act
Choreography: Jiri Kylian
Set and Costume Design: John F. Macfarlane
Lighting Designer: Hans-Joachim Haas
Lighting Designer (adaptation): Kees Tjebbes
Music Director: Anton Grishanin
Will be premiered on November 2, 2017.
Will run with one-act ballets Etudes and The Cage.

The world premiere took place in Stuttgart on April 4, 1981.

Coppelia (Ballet by Leo Delibes)

Coppelia (Ballet by Leo Delibes)

Ballet in three acts
Libretto by Charles Nuitter and Arthur Saint-Leon after the stories by Ernst Theodore Amadeus Hoffmann
Choreography: Marius Petipa and Enrico Cecchetti
Revival and new choreographic version: Sergei Vikharev
Designer: Boris Kaminsky
Costume Designer: Tatiana Noginova
Music Director: Igor Dronov
Lighting Designer: Damir Ismagilov

SYNOPSIS

Act I
A public Square in a small town, on the borders of Galicia, with wooden houses painted with bright colors. One house stands out in contrast to the others, with grating before the windows and the door securely fastened. This is the residence of Coppelius.
Swanilda is approaching the house of Coppelius, raises her eyes to a large window, behind which Coppelia, the daughter of old Coppelius, is seen, sitting with a book in her hands apparently absorbed in her reading. Every morning she is seen at the same window and in the same attitude, and then disappears. She never goes out from this mysterious residence. She appears to be pretty, and many young men in the town have passed long hours beneath her window, beseeching for one look.
Swanilda suspects that her fiance, Frantz, is not indifferent to the beauty of Coppelia. She tries to attract her attention, but Coppelia has her eyes always fixed on her book, of which she does not even turn the leaves.
Swanilda cannot contain her feelings of anger. She starts to knock at the door, but she perceives Frantz approaching, and remains in hiding to see what he is going to do.
Frantz, who at first was going toward Swanilda house, suddenly stops. Coppelia is at the window. He bows to her. At the same time she turns her head and appears to return Frantz s salute. Frantz has scarcely time to throw a kiss to Coppelia before old Coppelius has opened his window, and seems to be amused at what has been going on.
Swanilda is furious against Coppelius and against Frantz. However, she remains quiet and pretends to have seen nothing. She runs after a butterfly. Frantz runs with her, and catching it, pins it in the collar of his coat. Swanilda reproaches him for his cruelty: "What has this poor insect done to you?" After many reproaches, the young maid brings herself to tell him, that she knows all. He has deceived her. He loves Coppelia. Frantz tries in vain to defend himself.
The Burgomaster announces that on the next day a grand fete will take place - the Lord of the manor has given a bell to the Town. They crowd round the Burgomaster. The noise is being made in Coppelius house. Odd looking lights are shining at the windows. Some of the girls shrink with fear from this mysterious abode. But it is nothing but the clash of the hammer on the anvil, and the light is the reflection from the forge. Coppelius is an old fool who is always working. At what? No one knows and who cares? He must be left alone and not be stopped from amusing himself. The Burgomaster approaches Swanilda. He tells her that tomorrow the lord of the manor will give a dowry and marriage to several couples. She is betrothed to Frantz; shall they not be united to-morrow? Ah! but there is time yet, and the young girl looking spitefully at Frantz, tells the Burgomaster that she will tell him a story. It is the story of a straw which reveals all secrets.
Swanilda takes the straw from a bundle, and placing it to her ear, pretends to listen; then she tells Frantz to listen also. Does it not tell him that he does not love Swanilda? Frantz answers that he hears nothing. Swanilda tries it with one of Frantz s friends, who pretends to hear very distinctly what the straw says. Frantz tries to protest, but Swanilda breaking the straw before his eyes, tells him that everything is broken between them. Frantz goes away, while Swanilda dances in the midst of her companions. Glasses are placed on the tables, and they drink the health of the lord of the manor and the Burgomaster.
Coppelius leaves his house and securely fastens the door. He has not gone many steps, before he is surrounded by a crowd of young fellows; some of whom want to take him away with them, while the others want to make him dance. The old man goes off swearing.
Swanilda is bidding adieu to her friends, when one of them sees a key, which Coppelius must have dropped.
The girls suggest to Swanilda to visit the mysterious house. At first Swanilda hesitates, but she wants to meet this rival. "Well, then, let us enter, " she says. The girls enter the house of Coppelius.
Frantz is seen coming up, carrying a ladder. He has determined to see what chance he has with Coppelia. The opportunity is most favorable and Coppelius is far off! But it is not so, for just as Frantz is steadying the ladder against the balcony, he sees Coppelius returning and looking for the lost key. He sees Frantz just about to climb the ladder. Frantz runs away.

Act II
A large room is full of all kinds of instruments and tools. There are several automata on pedestals. There are figures of an old man, dressed in Persian costume, a Negro in threatening attitude, a little Moorish cymbal-player, a Chinaman with a tympanon before him.
The girls cautiously enter Coppelius house. Who are those people standing still in the dark shadows? They are face to face with the strange figures which a moment before had so frightened them. Swanilda draws aside the heavy curtains. There she sees Coppelia seated with her book in her hand. Swanilda salutes the strange girl who remains motionless. She speaks to her, but gets no answer. She touches the young girl s arm and then starts back through fear. Can it be a living creature? She puts her hand to the heart, but it does not beat. This young lady is an automaton, and the handy-work of Coppelius! Swanilda doesn t worry herself any more about her rival, but looks forward to the fun of telling Frantz all about her discovery. The girls run laughing, around the studio. They have nothing to fear now.
One of them in passing by the Tympanon player, touches it by accident. It begins playing a tune. The girls are at first bewildered, but soon begin dancing. They then find the spring, which sets the little Moorish figure in motion.
Suddenly Coppelius returns in a furious rage. He draws together the curtains which conceal Coppelia; stops the automata and runs after the girls. They slip through his hands and disappear down the back stairs. Swanilda is hiding behind the curtains. She is caught! but no; crouching in a corner she remains unseen when Coppelius looks behind the curtain. He examines Coppelia and finds that no harm has been done. He breathes more freely.
But what is that noise? He sees the top of a ladder in the window and then Frantz appears. Coppelius does not show himself. Frantz is going toward the spot where he has seen Coppelia, when two stout hands seize him. Frantz nearly dead with fright, implores Coppelius to forgive him. He tries to escape, but the old man holds him tightly. "What are you up to here?" he asks. Frantz confesses that he is in love. "I am not so bad as people say. Sit down and let us take a drink together and have a chat, " answers Coppelius. He gets an old flagon of wine and two goblets. He takes a sip with Frantz, and then, when Frantz is not looking, he throws away the wine.
Frantz finds that the wine has a peculiar taste. He tosses it down, however, and Coppelius makes him drink more and more. Frantz tries to get near the window where he has seen Coppelia. But his legs give way, he falls heavily on the bench and is asleep.
Coppelius gets a magic book and studies its pages. Then he rolls the pedestal which holds Coppelia, bringing it nearer to sleeping Frantz. Placing his hands over the heart and forehead of the young man, he tries to take away his soul to give life to the young girl. Coppelia rises up, she begins her mechanical motions but then she descends the first step of the pedestal and then the second. She walks! She lives!
Coppelius is almost beside himself with joy. His work has surpassed all that human hand has ever created! She soon begins to dance slowly, and than all at once darts off so quickly that Coppelius can scarcely follow her. She smiles; a color comes to her cheeks and she is full of life!
She sees the vial and places it to her lips. Coppelius is just in time to snatch the flagon from her hands. She perceives the magic book and asks Coppelius what it means. "There are impenetrable secrets, " he answers, and closes the book. She examines the automata. "I have made them all, " Coppelius says. She stops in front of Frantz. "And that one?" she asks. "It is like the rest, " he answers. She sees a dagger and pricks her own finger with the point of it and then amuses herself by thrusting it at the little Moor. Coppelius roars with laughter... but she approaches Frantz... The old man stops her and she turns against him and chases him around the studio. At last he disarms her. He throws a cloak over her shoulders, and it seems to awaken in her a world of new ideas. She dances a Spanish dance. Then she finds a Scotch scarf-pin and taking it in her hands, she dances a jig. She jumps and runs around, throwing everything within her reach to the ground and breaking it! She is decidedly too lively! What shall Coppelius do!
In the midst of all the noise, Frantz wakes up. Coppelius now seizes Coppelia and replacing her by main force on the pedestal, draws the curtains. He then goes up to Frantz and orders him to leave. "Go along!" he cries, "you are good for nothing."
Then he stops and listens. Did he not hear the tune which generally accompanies the movement of the automata? He jumps up and while he is staring at Coppelia, who has started her old movements, Swanilda skips out unobserved from behind the curtain. She sets the other two automata going. "Are these two also moving by themselves?" Coppelius exclaims. All at once he sees Swanilda disappearing with Frantz. He has a vague notion that some game has been played on him and falls heavily in the midst of the automata which keep moving as if to mock at their master s grief and despair.

Act III
A lawn in front of the baronial castle. At the back, the bell, the gift of the lord of the manor, is hung from poles, decorated with garlands and banners. A car covered with allegorical designs and on which are grouped the various actors for the fete, has just stopped in front of the bell.
The priests have pronounced a benediction over the bell. The betrothed couples who are to be given a dowry, and are to be united on this festal day go and bow before the baron. Frantz and Swanilda complete their mutual reconciliation. Frantz has disabused himself of his temporary infatuation and thinks no more of Coppelia. He knows what a joke has been played upon him. Swanilda forgives him and giving him her hand, advances with him before the lord of the manor.
All at once there is a stir among the crowd. Coppelius comes to implore and even to demand justice; they have ridiculed him and have broken everything in his house, his masterpieces made with the greatest labor and patience, have been smashed. Who is going to pay him? Swanilda, who has just received her dowry, quickly offers it to Coppelius. But the lord of the manor stops Swanilda. She may keep her dowry. He throws a purse to him and whilst Coppelius departs with his money, he gives the signal for the festivities to begin.
The Bell-ringer alights first from the car. He summons the Morning Hours. They appear, quickly followed by Aurora. The bell rings! It is the Hour of Prayer. Aurora vanishes, chased by the Hours of Day. These are the working hours, and the young girls and reapers begin their work. The bell rings again! It announces a wedding.
Derived from: Delibes Ballet of Coppelia. Paris Opera Libretto. Under the Direction of Mr. Heinrich Conried. The Original Italian, French or German Libretto with a Correct English Translation. New York : F. Rullman.

Cosi fan tutte,ossia La scuola degli amanti (Opera by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart)

Cosi fan tutte,ossia La scuola degli amanti (Opera by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart)

Opera in two acts
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Libreto by Lorenzo da Ponte
Stage Director: Floris Visser
Designer: Dieuweke van Reij
Lighting Designer: Alex Brok
Premiered on May 24, 2014

Synopsis

Act I
Ferrando is in love with Dorabella and Guglielmo is in love with Fiordiligi, her sister. Don Alfonso outrages the men by stating that the girls will sooner or later be unfaithful to them; he makes a bet with them that he can prove his words within the space of a day, but that Ferrando and Guglielmo must follow his orders completely during that time. Dorabella and Fiordiligi are waiting impatiently and longingly for their lovers. Alfonso, however, arrives instead and imparts the disastrous news that their fiances must leave immediately for the battlefield. The couples swear eternal fidelity and with great difficulty the sisters bid farewell to their lovers. Ferrando and Guglielmo leave for the front.
Dorabella cannot restrain her despair. The servant girl Despina reacts matter-of-factly and advises the sisters to look for new lovers. Alfonso decides to involve Despina partially in his plans. He introduces her to two exotic foreigners whom he says are in love with Fiordiligi and Dorabella: Despina"s job is to help them obtain their desires. The men"s disguise is complete, for Despina does not recognise them. The sisters are horrified that strange men have gained access to their house. Fiordiligi is offended to the core by their shameless courting and proclaims the steadfastness of her and Dorabella"s fidelity.
Alfonso has to trust in Despina"s talents for the success of his next plan. She advises the foreigners to pretend to kill themselves for unrequited love. As a miracle-working doctor Despina then seems to save the lives of the two men with a magnet; their complete recovery, she says, can only be completed by a kiss from the two sisters. The women react with horrified indignation to such a suggestion.

Act II
Despina advises the sisters how to carry out a no-strings-attached flirtation with the two strangers; the two women are now prepared to allow themselves a little amusement with the men. Dorabella chooses the disguised Guglielmo and Fiordiligi the disguised Ferrando.
The men serenade the women, begging forgiveness for their forward behavior and promising to mend their ways. Alfonso and Despina arrange matters so that the new couples come closer together.
Dorabella is only too ready to exchange her locket with Ferrando"s picture for a medallion in the shape of a heart offered by the disguised Guglielmo. Their new relationship is thus confirmed.
The disguised Ferrando has, however, been rejected with disgust by Fiordiligi. Alone, she nevertheless has to admit to herself that she has fallen in love with the newcomer. Filled with remorse, she begs forgiveness for her infidelity to Guglielmo.
Guglielmo finds it extremely difficult to defend his seduction of Ferrando"s fiancee to Ferrando himself.
Dorabella is ready to begin a new life with her new lover.
Fiordiligi is offended by her sister"s behaviour. However, she intends to flee her newly discovered love and decides to go to Guglielmo. She is trying on clothing left behind by Ferrando when the disguised Ferrando himself appears; Fiordiligi can resist him no longer. Don Alfonso explains the lesson that must be learnt from their experiences to the disillusioned men: such is women"s nature. Despina arrives with the message that the sisters are ready to marry the strangers and that the notary is standing by. A double wedding ceremony is improvised and both women have just signed the marriage contracts when Ferrando"s and Guglielmo"s return is announced. The supposed bridegrooms hide in an adjoining room - only to readopt their original characters and to give the sisters the fright of their lives at their supposed return. Don Alfonso shows them the marriage contracts. The boys react furiously, but the sisters beg for forgiveness. Ferrando and Guglielmo would love to believe them, but do not want to experience something like this ever again. Don Alfonso has won his bet: young people cannot arrive at adulthood emotionally unscathed.

Don Pasquale (Opera by Gaetano Donizetti)

Don Pasquale (Opera by Gaetano Donizetti)

Gaetano Donizetti
Opera in three acts
Libretto by Giovanni Ruffini based on Angelo Anelli"s libretto "Ser Marcantonio"
Music Director: Michal Klauza
Stage Director: Timofey Kulyabin
Set Designer: Oleg Golovko
Costume Designer: Galya Solodovnikova
Lighting Designer: Denis Solntsev
Chief Chorus Master: Valery Borisov
Dramaturge: Ilya Kukharenko
Premiered on April 19, 2016.

Synopsis
St. Jerome University, Rome, present day.

Act I
Scene One. The University

Don Pasquale, a renowned scholar and a confirmed bachelor, makes a decision to marry on the brink of his 70th birthday.
He receives Dr Malatesta, who offers him his sister Sofronia as a bride-to-be. The girl was raised in a convent and is full of virtue. Inflamed Pasquale sends Malatesta to fetch her.
The bridegroom is anxious to share the happy news with his subordinates and his nephew Ernesto. The uncle and the nephew have been in conflict for a long time. Don Pasquale threatens to cut Ernesto off and even disinherit him by marrying, if Ernesto keeps resisting the good match arranged by his uncle, but the young man remains true to his love for the penniless young widow Norina.
Knowing now that Don Pasquale"s marriage is no blind threat, Ernesto is in turmoil. In addition he learns from his uncle that his friend Malatesta betrayed him by arranging Don Pasquale"s betrothal.
Insulted by his nephew"s obstinacy and derision, Don Pasquale cuts him off and kicks him out.

Scene Two. Norina"s flat
Norina spends her morning reading romantic novels and imagining herself as a heroine, when she is delivered a message from Ernesto. He bids his farewell as he is going to leave the country. The woman"s plans to marry him are ruined.
Malatesta arrives and comforts Norina"s distress: his new plan is to wed Norina to Don Pasquale by disguising her as a meek and virtuous Sofronia. Malatesta"s cousin Carlotto is to impersonate a notary. Once the fake marriage contract is signed, Norina is to make the old man"s life insufferable, so that he comes to his senses and agrees to his nephew"s marriage with Norina.
Malatesta and Norina rehearse the behaviour of the simple and naive girl Sofronia and discuss the details of their plot.

Act II
The University

Ernesto says goodbye to his alma mater where he spent his adolescence, and composes another farewell letter to his beloved.
Don Pasquale prepares to meet his bride. Malatesta introduces Norina as the shy Sofronia. Don Pasquale is enchanted and implores Malatesta to fetch a notary without delay and conclude the marriage contract.
Carlotto arrives disguised as a notary. Rejoicing, Don Pasquale assigns half of his property to his new wife and bequeaths all his estate to be administrated by her.
As they proceed to sign the contract, Ernesto rushes in to say goodbye to his uncle. He is shocked to find out that Norina is the bride: Malatesta did not warn him beforehand thinking he was already away. Now Malatesta has to drag Ernesto in off the cuff. Eventually Malatesta makes Ernesto sign the marriage contract as the final witness.
After the formal part is completed, Norina stops pretending docile, positions herself in charge and confronts Don Pasquale, then summons his personnel and gives them absurd orders. Puzzled, the University staff has to obey. Don Pasquale is dismayed at his bride"s transformation and feels that he was betrayed, but the contract is already concluded.

Act III
Scene One. The University

Norina and Malatesta have changed the plan of the upcoming celebration of Don Pasquale"s birthday and are now preparing a new programme for the event. The whole University watches the preparations in astonishment. Don Pasquale has to pay countless bills.
He spots Sofronia/Norina leave the building dressed in an evening frock. Despite all the quarrels Don Pasquale still hopes to set things right with his young wife on their wedding night. He tries to stop her, but she mocks him and slaps him in the face. He is in despair. Sofronia/Norina goes away but secretly leaves behind a fake note from a lover about a date that night. Don Pasquale is mad with jealousy.
Don Pasquale"s employees discuss the new establishment and constant fighting between the spouses.
Malatesta sends Ernesto to the garden to impersonate Sofronia"s lover. Don Pasquale arrives. He is broken and devastated. He complains to Malatesta about Sofronia"s severity and harshness and accuses his wife of adultery. He wants to catch her in flagrante and call the police.
Malatesta consoles Don Pasquale and persuades him to keep the matter silent: if Sofronia is caught, she might quietly concede to divorce. Don Pasquale agrees with this plan and aspires for revenge and redemption.

Scene Two. The "garden"
Ernesto sings a serenade to Sofronia pretending to be her lover. Then he and Norina sing a love duet to attract Don Pasquale"s attention, and Ernesto hides away.
Don Pasquale"s hopes to catch both Sofronia/Norina and her lover are ruined as he finds her alone. She is outraged and denies all his accusations, as well as his claims for divorce. Don Pasquale is desperate to break the marriage bonds. Malatesta offers his help, provided that he is given a free hand.
In Don Pasquale"s presence Malatesta tells Sofronia that soon she will have to share her authority as a mistress with Norina, Ernesto"s future wife. Sofronia takes this ill. It is she who demands a divorce now. Pasquale is anxious to secure it by arranging his nephew"s wedding right away and even providing the couple with a substantial sum of money. He summons Ernesto to wed him to Norina at once.
Ernesto arrives. He, Norina and Malatesta confess their fraud. Don Pasquale is relieved to learn that his marriage was fake and that Sofronia is in fact Norina. He pardons everyone and gives his blessing to the loving couple.

Hero of Our Time (Ballet by Ilya Demutsky)

Hero of Our Time (Ballet by Ilya Demutsky)

Ballet in two acts
Composer: Ilya Demutsky
Choreographer: Yuri Possokhov
Director, Designer and Author of Libretto: Kirill Serebrennikov
Costume Designers: Elena Zaitseva, Kirill Serebrennikov
Music Durector: Anton Grishanin
The world premiere took place on 22 July 2015.
The first and the second parts are performed without intermission.
Running time: 2 hours 15 minutes.

Synopsis

Can it be that wickedness is so attractive?..
Pechorin"s diary

BELA

1.
Prologue
Pechorin alone.
When I saw Bela in my own house; when, for the first time, I held her on my knee and kissed her black locks, I, fool that I was, thought that she was an angel sent to me by sympathetic fate... Again I was mistaken; the love of a savage is little better than that of your lady of quality, the barbaric ignorance and simplicity of the one weary you as much as the coquetry of the other. I am not saying that I do not love her still; I am grateful to her for a few fairly sweet moments; I would give my life for her - only I am bored with her... Whether I am a fool or a villain I know not; but this is certain, I am also most deserving of pity - perhaps more than she...
Bela"s funerals.
Muezzin"s exequial cant and a voice of a Russian wailer are heard.
How tiresome... I went away to order a coffin. Should I have erected a cross? No, a cross would not have done!..
...After all, she was not a Christian.

2.
Celebration.
Mountaneers, Pechorin, Kazbich.

Bela appears.
"What was it she sang - do you remember?"
"It went like this, I fancy: "Handsome, they say, are our young horsemen, and the tunics they wear are garnished with silver; but handsomer still is the young Russian officer, and the lace on his tunic is wrought of gold. Like a poplar amongst them he stands, but in gardens of ours such trees will grow not nor bloom!"
"Well, now, what do you think of her?"
"Charming! What is her name?"
"Her name is Bela."
"Bela."
"It is a bad thing to interfere in other people"s quarrels. Wouldn"t it be better for us to clear off without loss of time?"
"Wait, though, and see how it will end!"
"Oh, as to that, it will be sure enough to end badly; it is always so with these Asiatics. Once let them get drunk on buza, and there"s certain to be bloodshed."
Pechorin abducts Bela.

3.
Bela at Pechorin"s.
She sits in the corner, muffled in her veil, and neither speaks nor looks up - timid as a wild chamois! I have hired the wife of our dukhan-keeper: she will look after Bela and accustom her to the idea that she belongs to me - for she shall belong to no one else!
No one!
Pechorin seduces Bela.
"Listen, my Peri, surely you know that you will have to be mine sooner or later - why, then, do you but torture me? Is it that you are in love with some Chechene? If so, I will let you go home at once. Or is it that I am utterly hateful to you? Or that your faith prohibits you from giving me a little of your love? Believe me, Allah is one and the same for all races; and, if he permits me to love you, why, then, should he prohibit you from requiting me by returning my love? Listen, my dear, good Bela! You see how I love you. I am ready to give up everything to make you cheerful once more. I want you to be happy, and, if you are going to be sad again, I shall die. Tell me, you will be more cheerful?"

Bela is happy.

Pechorin returns. He has lost interest in his abductee.
Bela"s heart is broken.

4.
Mountaneers. Kazbich. Bela"s death.
"I don"t want to die!.. It burns..."
"Where?"
"Here in my breast... Piercing... As a red-hot blade... Water, water!..
"Where is father?! Grisha... I want back to the mountains, back home...
"Grishaaa... Why don"t you love your janechka anymore?.. Is it because I am not a Christian? How terrible, Grisha... how terrible... our souls will not meet in the other world... in Paradise another woman will be your companion..."
"Do you want to be baptized?"
"No... I will die in the faith in which I was born... It is better now... Go to bed, Grisha... Kiss me, Grisha... I beg of you..."
Pechorin and the dead Bela. He is uncertain whether he should bury her as a Christian or as a Muslim.
The mountains of Caucasus are not moved by human pain.

TAMAN

1.
Pechorin arrives at Taman.
Taman is the nastiest little hole of all the seaports of Russia. I was all but starved there, to say nothing of having a narrow escape of being drowned. I arrived late at night by the post-car... The sentry, a Cossack from the Black Sea, hearing the jingle of the bell, cried out, sleepily, in his barbarous voice, "Who goes there?" An under-officer of Cossacks and a headborough came out. I explained that I was an officer bound for the active-service detachment on Government business, and I proceeded to demand official quarters. The headborough conducted us round the town. Whatever hut we drove up to we found to be occupied. The weather was cold; I had not slept for three nights; I was tired out, and I began to lose my temper.
"Take me somewhere or other, you scoundrel!" I cried; "to the devil himself, so long as there"s a place to put up at!"
"There is one other lodging," answered the headborough, scratching his head. "Only you won"t like it, sir. It is uncanny!"

2.
A mysterious house at the sea shore. The wind is blowing.
Pechorin, the Old Woman, the Blind Boy.
"You are the master"s son?"
"No."
"Who are you, then?
"An orphan - a poor boy."
"Has the mistress any children?"
"No, her daughter ran away and crossed the sea with a Tartar."
"Not a single icon to be seen on the wall - a bad sign!"
Undine appears.
Pechorin falls in love with the strange beauty.
Certainly never before had I seen a woman like her. She was by no means beautiful; but, as in other matters, I have my own prepossessions on the subject of beauty. There was a good deal of breeding in her... Breeding in women, as in horses, is a great thing...
Breeding is chiefly to be detected in the gait, in the hands and feet; the nose, in particular, is of the greatest significance. In Russia a straight nose is rarer than a small foot.
Undine disappears.
Alone, Pechorin falls asleep.

3.
Pechorin"s dream. March of uncanny creatures.
I confess that I have a violent prejudice against all blind, one-eyed, deaf, dumb, legless, armless, hunchbacked, and such-like people. I have observed that there is always a certain strange connection between a man"s exterior and his soul; as, if when the body loses a limb, the soul also loses some power of feeling.
Undine reappears. Seagulls cry.
Pechorin and Undine"s love duet.
"Tell me, my beauty, what were you doing on the roof to-day?"
"I was looking to see from what direction the wind was blowing."
"What did you want to know for?"
"Whence the wind blows comes happiness."
"Well? Were you invoking happiness with your song?"
"Where there is singing there is also happiness."
"But what if your song were to bring you sorrow?"
"Well, what then? Where things won"t be better, they will be worse; and from bad to good again is not far."
"And who taught you that song?"
"Nobody taught me; it comes into my head and I sing; whoever is to hear it, he will hear it, and whoever ought not to hear it, he will not understand it."
Undune lures Pechorin at sea.
"To-night, when everyone is asleep, go out to the shore."
"Follow me! Let us get into the boat."
"What is the meaning of this?"
"It means, it means that I love you!.."
"What do you want?.."
Undine tries to drown Pechorin. They struggle.
Pechorin manages to survive.

4.
Pechorin searches for Undine in vain.
Pechorin, the Old Woman, the Blind Boy.
"How come that you have a daughter?"
"I am deaf. I don"t hear you."
"You don"t have a daughter, do you?"
"I am deaf as a post."
"Now, then, you little blind devil. Tell me, where were you roaming with the bundle last night, eh?"
"Where did I go? I did not go anywhere... With the bundle?.. What bundle?"

5.
Seashore at night. Smugglers.
Arrival of Yanko, leader of smugglers and Undine"s lover.
Yanko, Undine, the Blind Boy.
"Yanko, all is lost! He saw us.. He will tell on us...
"Listen, you blind one... She is coming with me. It is impossible for her to remain here. Tell the old woman that it is time for her to die; she has been here a long time, and the line must be drawn somewhere. As for us, she will never see us any more."
"And I?.."
"What use have I for you?"
"Come on, Yanko..."
Undine and Yanko get away.
The Blind Boy and Pechorin remain alone.

Thank Heaven an opportunity of getting away presented itself in the morning, and I left Taman. What became of the old woman and the poor blind boy I know not. And, besides, what are the joys and sorrows of mankind to me - me, a travelling officer, and one, moreover, with an order for post-horses on Government business?

PRINCESS MARY

1.
Prologue - Pechorin"s solo
Yesterday I arrived at Pyatigorsk. I have engaged lodgings at the extreme end of the town, the highest part, at the foot of Mount Mashuk: during a storm the clouds will descend on to the roof of my dwelling. This morning at five o"clock, when I opened my window, the room was filled with the fragrance of the flowers growing in the modest little front-garden. Branches of bloom-laden bird-cherry trees peep in at my window, and now and again the breeze bestrews my writing-table with their white petals... Blithe is life in such a land! A feeling akin to rapture is diffused through all my veins. The air is pure and fresh, like the kiss of a child; the sun is bright, the sky is blue - what more could one possibly wish for? What need, in such a place as this, of passions, desires, regrets?..

2.
Watering-place society.
Medical treatment, exercises, water well.

Grushnitski arrives with the wounded soldiers.
Grushnitski and Pechorin meet.
"You are embittered against the whole human race?"
"And I have cause to be..."
"Oh, really?"

Mary"s arrival.
Pechorin understands that Grushnitski is in love with Mary.

I have never known a waist more voluptuous and supple! Her fresh breath touched my face; at times a lock of hair, becoming separated from its companions in the eddy of the waltz, glided over my burning cheek... She was out of breath, her eyes were dulled, her half-open lips were scarcely able to whisper the indispensable: "Merci, monsieur."

Vera"s appearance.

Has destiny brought us together again in the Caucasus, or has she come hither on purpose, knowing that she would meet me?.. There is not a man in the world over whom the past has acquired such a power as over me...

Pechorin and Vera.
"Vera!"
"I knew that you were here."
"We have not seen each other for a long time."
"A long time, and we have both changed in many ways."
"Consequently you love me no longer?.."
"I am married!.."
"Again? A few years ago, however, that reason also existed, but, nevertheless..."
"Perhaps you love your second husband?.. Or is he very jealous? What then? He is young, handsome and, I suppose, rich - which is the chief thing - and you are afraid?.."
"Tell me, do you find it very amusing to torture me? I ought to hate you. Since we have known each other, you have given me naught but suffering..."
"Perhaps, it is for that very reason that you have loved me; joys are forgotten, but sorrows never..."

Mary helps Grushnitski who has pretended he is wounded in order to attract her attention.
Pechorin mockers Grushnitski, and he becomes furious.

"Did you see? She is an angel, simply an angel!"
"Why?"
"Did you not see, then?"
"No. I saw her picking up your tumbler. If there had been an attendant there he would have done the same thing - and quicker too, in the hope of receiving a tip. It is quite easy, however, to understand that she pitied you; you made such a terrible grimace when you walked on the wounded foot."
"And can it be that seeing her, as you did, at that moment when her soul was shining in her eyes, you were not in the least affected?"
"No."

Pechorin and Mary remain alone with each other.
"I have heard, Princess, that although quite unacquainted with you, I have already had the misfortune to incur your displeasure... that you have considered me insolent. Can that possibly be true?"
"Would you like to confirm me in that opinion now?".
"If I had the audacity to insult you in any way, then allow me to have the still greater audacity to beg your pardon... And, indeed, I should very much like to prove to you that you are mistaken in regard to me..."

Mary falls under Pechorin"s spell.
Grushnitski is jealous.

3.
Gentlemen"s club. Grushnitski complains about Pechorin"s actions. He thinks Pechorin is going to conquer Mary for himself.

A ball commences.
Polonaise. Waltz. Polka.
Pechorin dances with Mary.
"I did not expect this from you."
"What?"
"You are going to dance the mazurka with her? She admitted it..."
"Well, what then? It is not a secret, is it?"
"Of course not... I ought to have expected such a thing from that chit - that flirt... I will have my revenge, though!"
"You should lay the blame on your cloak, or your epaulettes, but why accuse her? What fault is it of hers that she does not like you any longer?.."
"But why give me hopes?"
"Why did you hope? To desire and to strive after something - that I can understand! But who ever hopes?"
"You have won the wager, but not quite."
Quarrel between Grushnitski and Pechorin. Grushnitski challenges Pechorin.

4.
Vera"s letter.
Pechorin and Vera.

Vera (soprano):
I am writing to you in the full assurance that we shall never see each other again. A few years ago on parting with you I thought the same...
it has been Heaven"s will to try me a second time...
...I have not been able to endure the trial, my frail heart has again submitted to the well-known voice...
...you will not despise me for that - will you?
will you?
will you?
...We are parting for ever.
...you may be sure
that I shall never
love another

never

upon you
my soul has exhausted
all its treasure,
its tears
its hopes

...in your nature
there is
something peculiar
there is
something proud and mysterious...
in your voice
there is an invincible power

no one
can so constantly wish to be loved
in no one
is wickedness ever so attractive
no one"s
glance promises so much bliss...
bliss...
bliss...

no one
can better make use of his advantages
and no one
can be
so truly unhappy
so truly unhappy
so truly unhappy
as you...

5.
Pechorin and Grushnitski before the duel.
Each is contemplating his own thoughts.
Seconds appear. The duel is prepared.
Pechorin and Grushnitski swap their pistols.
The duel.
"Grushnitski! There is still time: recant your slander, and I will forgive you everything. You have not succeeded in making a fool of me; my self-esteem is satisfied. Remember - we were once friends..."
"Fire! I despise myself and I hate you. If you do not kill me I will lie in wait for you some night and cut your throat. There is not room on the earth for both of us..."
Fire.
Grushnitski is killed.

Vera appears.
Vera (soprano):
I almost fainted at the thought that you had to fight a duel to-day... it seemed to me that I should go mad...

...I am sure
that you remain alive

it is impossible
that you should die, and I not with you

it is impossible
that you should die, and I not with you

impossible...

|impossible...

impossible...

6.
Pechorin realizes that he has killed his friend.
Pangs of conscience.
Vera (soprano):
I have been sitting at the window
three hours now,
awaiting your return...
But you are alive, you cannot have died!..

Good-bye, good-bye!..
If I could be sure
that you will always remember me -
I no longer say love
- no,
only remember...
only remember...
only remember...
Mary appears.
Pechorin tells her that he doesn"t love her.
"Princess, you know that I have been making fun of you?.. You must despise me. Consequently, you cannot love me..."
"Oh, God!"
Mary is disgraced.

Pechorin, Mary, Vera.
"You do not love Mary, do you? You will not marry her? Listen, you must offer me that sacrifice. I have lost everything in the world for you..."

7.
Epilogue.
Pechorin. Pechorin. Pechorin.
And now... I often ask myself, as my thoughts wander back to the past: why did I not wish to tread that way, thrown open by destiny, where soft joys and ease of soul were awaiting me?.. No, I could never have become habituated to such a fate! I am like a sailor born and bred on the deck of a pirate brig: his soul has grown accustomed to storms and battles; but, once let him be cast upon the shore, and he chafes, he pines away, however invitingly the shady groves allure, however brightly shines the peaceful sun. The livelong day he paces the sandy shore, hearkens to the monotonous murmur of the onrushing waves, and gazes into the misty distance: lo! yonder, upon the pale line dividing the blue deep from the grey clouds, is there not glancing the longed-for sail, at first like the wing of a seagull, but little by little severing itself from the foam of the billows and, with even course, drawing nigh to the desert harbour?..

Il Barbiere di Siviglia (Opera by Gioachino Rossini)

Il Barbiere di Siviglia (Opera by Gioachino Rossini)

Gioachino Rossini
Opera in two acts
Sung in Italian.
Libretto by Cesare Sterbini after the comedy of the same name by Pierre-Augustin de Beaumarchais
Music Director: Pier Giorgio Morandi
Stage Director: Evgany Pisarev
Set Designer: Zinovy Margolin
Costumer Designer: Olga Shaishmelashvili
Lighting Desiner: Damir Ismagilov
Cheif Chorus Master: Valery Borisov
Will be premiered on 3 November 2018.

La Boheme. Premiere! (Opera by Giacomo Puccini)

La Boheme. Premiere! (Opera by Giacomo Puccini)

Opera in four acts
Libretto by Giuseppe Giacosa and Luigi Illica
based on Henry Murger"s novel Scenes de la Vie de Boheme
Music Director: Evan Rogister
Stage Director: Jean-Romain Vesperini
Set Designer: Bruno de Lavenere
Costume Designer: Cedric Tirado
Lightning Designer: Christophe Chaupin
Video Designer: Etienne Guiol
Premiered on July 24, 2018

Synopsis
Scene I
A Garret

In an unheated garret Marcello, an artist, is working on his canvas "Crossing the Red Sea". He has difficulty holding his brush because the cold has so cramped his fingers. His friend, the poet Rodolfo, enviously looks at the smoke emerging from the smokestacks of the well-heated Parisian houses. Marcello sadly muses over his flighty and unfaithful girl-friend Musetta. Rodolfo turns down Marcello"s offer to fire the stove with his unfinished "Red Sea" and decides to sacrifice the first act of his drama rather than break up the chair for this purpose.
Another friend, the philosopher Colline, returns with a bundle of books that he wanted to sell, but since this is Christmas eve the stores were closed. His bad mood is dispelled by the warmth of the heated stove.
The fourth member of the group of friends arrives. The musician Schaunard with the help of errand-boys has brought delicious snacks, wine, cigars, firewood and a bunch of coins. All are so aghast atthe sight of such riches that they are not listening to Schaunard"s story about what happened. He became acquainted with a bored Englishman who wanted nothing more of him than that he "play" until death a parrot that was disturbing him. The successful job, which was not completed without a little poison, was generously rewarded. Schaunard hinders the immediate consumption of the food, but allows them to enjoy the wine. Then, in a condescending tone, he invites his friends to partake in Latin Quarter cuisine.
The joyful mood is disturbed by the arrival of Benoit, the old landlord, who demands the long-overdue rent. They reassure him by showing that they have money and offer him wine. He becomes somewhat tight and boasts of past amorous escapades, whereupon they hit him with his own weapon of Philistine morals: indignantly, they turn the shameful "debauchee" out of the room without paying the rent. Schaunard magnanimously shares his money with his friends and all head for their favourite cafe. Rodolfo decides to stay for a few minutes to finish an article. The friends will wait for him below.
Mimi, a neighbour, comes to ask that her extinguished candle be lighted. A coughing spell detains her in the room. Rodolfo is captivated by the tender creature. After leaving, Mimi returns in search of her key. The draft extinguishes both candles. Rodolfo and Mimi rummage in the dark in search of the key. Rodolfo finds it and unnoticed hides it. Taking advantage of the situation, he dares totouch Mimi"s hand.
Rodolfo contemplates: can he build castles in the air when he is merely a hopelessly poor poet? But Mimi"s beautiful eyes immediately give him reason for optimism.
Mimi tells about herself: she is a seamstress. Her simple existence is warmed by the modest happiness of "unrealizable fantasies" and the "poetry" of minutiae. Rodolfo"s friends are still waiting below and call to him. He tells them to go on and promises to follow shortly. In the enchanting beams of the moonlight penetrating the attic, Rodolfo and Mimi speak of their love for each other.Then, Mimi remembers their promise, so hand in hand they head for the Latin Quarter.

Scene II
In the Latin Quarter

At the Christmas fair in front of the cafe, traders offer their goods. Each of the friends, having come into means, makes his purchases. Schaunard buys a defective horn, Colline acquires a stack of books and Rodolfo a mob-cap for Mimi. Only Marcello, yearning for Musetta, cannot find consolation in spending money or flirting with other girls. The companions finally meet in the cafe. Mimi is gladly accepted as one of the group. While in the street children noisily surround Parpignol, the trader of toys. They order exquisite viands. Rodolfo and Mimi"s love makes Marcello utter bitter truths.
The season for Marcello"s dejected state soon comes to light. The appearance of Musetta, accompanied by a rich and already piqued suitor, calls forth a burst of animation in the cafe. The darling ofthe Latin Quarter tries by all means to attract the attention of her former lover. Marcello, despite all efforts, cannot hide that he is not indifferent to her. When Musetta, to Alcindoro"s shame, sings a song directed only to Marcello, the ice breaks. Enfeebled Alcindoro is unable to pacify excited Musetta. Musetta gets rid of her suitor by claiming that her foot hurts and she needs new shoes. As soon as he leaves, Musetta and Marcello fall into each others arms. The check brought by the waiter causes bewilderment, but Musetta puts the bill on Alcindoro"s account. When Alcindoro returns, he finds the cafe empty. He remains alone with the box of shoes and the unpaid bill.

Scene III
At the Gate d"Enfer

Marcello and Musetta have found temporary quarters in a tavern on the outskirts of Paris. Marcello is painting a signboard for the owner. Mimi, plagued by coughing spells, asks the sergeant about theartist Marcello. She calls him from the tavern and tells him about her troubles. She knows that Rodolfo loves her, but nevertheless he has left her.
Marcello confirms that Rodolfo has come here early morning and, exhausted, is now sleeping. Under such circumstances, he is also for separation. He, like Musetta, prefers a light relationship.Rodolfo wants to open his heart to his friend. Marcello does not hide that he thinks Marcello is concealing something. Rodolfo claims that Mimi continuously flirts with other men, so that living with her has become impossible. When Marcello expresses doubts, Rodolfo reveals the real reason for his decision: Mimi"s incurable disease and his poor room with northern exposure is undermining her health further. Marcello is unable to prevent Mimi from learning the bitter truth. A coughing spell reveals her presence. Repenting, Rodolfo embraces Mimi, while jealous Marcello, infuriated by the flirtatious laughter of Musetta, rushes into the tavern.
Now, Mimi has decided to leave Rodolfo. But recalling their life together does not allow them to separate. While Marcello makes a scene out of jealousy and Musetta leaves him again, Rodolfo and Mimidecide to postpone separation until Spring.

Scene IV
A Garret

Several months later. Rodolfo and Marcello are again alone in the garret. They cannot forget their past happiness. The friends are submerged in thoughts. Each is looking at his pledge of love: Marcello at Musetta"s portrait and Rodolfo at the mob-cap, his present to Mimi.
Schaunard and Colline enter and bring only stale bread and a wretched herring. With the humour of gallows-birds, they act as though before them is a richly-laden table.
At the height of the merriment, Musetta rushes in with the news that Mimi feels her end is approaching. Rodolfo seats Mimi in an arm-chair. Life returns. Everyone tries to lighten Mimi"s suffering. Marcello is to sell Musetta"s earrings and bring medicine. Musetta wants to buy a muff for Mimi"s hands that are always cold.
Colline is taking his old, worn coat to be pawned. Schaunard, who has nothing, contributes his only available contribution: he leaves Mimi and Rodolfo alone.
Happiness returns to Rodolfo and Mimi. They talk about memories of their past. A sudden choking spell makes Mimi silent. Marcello returns with medicine, Musetta with the desired muff. She supports Mimi"s illusion that it is Rodolfo"s gift. Mimi falls asleep happy. Marcello reports that the doctor will come soon. Schaunard is the first to realize that Mimi is dead. Colline returns with money from the pawnshop. The change in the behaviour of Marcello and Schaunard makes Rodolfo realize that Mimi has died.

La Silphide (Ballet by Herman Severin Levenskiold)

La Silphide (Ballet by Herman Severin Levenskiold)

Ballet in two acts
Libretto by Adolphe Nourrit and Philippo Taglioni
Choreography by August Bournonville
Production and New Choreography: Johan Kobborg
Designer: Peter Farmer
Music Director: Pavel Klinichev
Lighting Designer: Damir Ismagilov
This version of the ballet premiered on February 20, 2008.
Presented with one interval.
Running time: 2 hours.

SYNOPSIS

Act I
A Scottish manor-house

It is the morning of James s marriage to Effie and he is asleep in his armchair. A winged figure, a Sylphide, is kneeling by his side. She kisses him on his forehead and he wakes up confused. Entranced by the vision of the Sylph, he attempts to capture her, but she escapes him; as she reaches the fireplace, she vanishes up the chimney. Troubled, he wakes his companions but none of them have seen her. Gurn, James s rival, arrives and learns that James is infatuated with someone other than Effie.
The preparations for the wedding are in full swing. James hardly notices Effie; instead she is wooed by Gurn whom she ignores. James joins in the preparations but gradually realizes that, as Effie dreams more and more of the wedding, his own dreams go far beyond the walls of the manor-house.
An old woman, Madge, has slipped unnoticed into the hall to warm herself by the fire. James, sensing that she is a sinister presence, takes an immediate dislike to her and cannot bear to see her sitting where he last saw the Sylph. He orders her to leave but Effie calms him and persuades him to let Madge tell the fortunes of some of the guests. Madge prophesies that Effie will marry Gurn, and James, furious at this, threatens Madge, who curses him. Effie runs off to dress for the wedding leaving James alone and in turmoil.
The Sylph once again shows herself to James, declares her love for him and tells him that they belong together, Gurn enters and, believing that he may have caught James talking to another woman, attempts to reveal the situation to Effie but fails
As the wedding festivities begin, the Sylph reappears and, unable to resist her enticements, James follows her into the forest. Effie is left broken-hearted.

Act II
A glade in the forest

Deep in the forest, shrouded in mist, Madge is planning her revenge. She makes a veil, irresistible to all in a magic cauldron. As the fog lifts, James enters with the Sylph, who shows him her realm. She brings him berries and water but evades his embrace. To lift his spirits she calls on her sisters and the forest fills with sylphs, who dance for James. Try as he might, he is unable to catch the Sylph in his arms
Effie and James s companions reach the glade looking for him. Gurn finds James s hat, but Madge convinces him to say nothing. He proposes to Effie and, encouraged by Madge, she accepts. Everyone leaves to prepare for the wedding of Effie and Gurn.
Meanwhile, James is desperately looking for the Sylph, and Madge convinces him that the veil she has made will enable him to catch her. The Sylph appears and, seeing the veil is totally captivated by it. She allows James to place it around her shoulders and as he does so, he kisses her. His embrace is fatal and the Sylph s wings fall to the ground. In despair James sees what should have been his own wedding party in the distance. As Madge forces him to see what he has lost, he realizes that in trying to possess the unobtainable he has lost everything.

Le Nozze di Figaro (Opera by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart)

Le Nozze di Figaro (Opera by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart)

Opera in four acts
Music Director: William Lacey
Stage Director: Evgeny Pisarev
Set Designer: Zinovy Margolin
Lighting Designer: Damir Ismagilov
Will be premiered on 25 April 2015

Synopsis

Act I

Figaro and Susanna, servants to the Count and Countess Almaviva, are preparing for their wedding. Figaro is furious when he learns from his bride that the Count has tried to seduce her. He s determined to have his revenge on his master.

Dr. Bartolo appears with his former housekeeper, Marcellina, who is equally determined to marry Figaro. She has a contract: Figaro must marry her or repay the money he borrowed. When Marcellina runs into Susanna, the two rivals exchange insults.

Susanna returns to her room and an adolescent boy, Cherubino, rushes in. Finding Susanna alone, he tells her he loves her - and every other woman in the house. The Count appears, again trying to seduce Susanna, and Cherubino hides. The Count then conceals himself as well when Basilio, the music teacher, approaches. Basilio tells Susanna that Cherubino has a crush on the Countess. This causes the Count to step forward in anger. He becomes even more enraged when he discovers Cherubino and realizes that his attempts to seduce Susanna have been overheard.

He chases Cherubino into the great hall where they are met by Figaro, who has assembled the entire household to sing the praises of their master. The Count is forced to bless the marriage of Figaro and Susanna. To spite them and to silence Cherubino, he orders the boy to join the army without delay. Figaro ironically tells Cherubino what to expect in the army - no flirting with girls, no fancy clothes, no money, just shells, cannons, bullets, marching, and mud.

Act II

In her bedroom, Rosina, the Countess, mourns the loss of love in her life. Encouraged by Figaro and Susanna, she agrees to set a trap for her husband: they will send Cherubino, disguised as Susanna, to a rendezvous with the Count that night and at the same time make him believe that the Countess is having an assignation with another man. Cherubino appears and the two women lock the door, then begin to dress him up as a girl. While Susanna steps into an adjoining room, the Count knocks and is annoyed to find the door locked. Cherubino shuts himself in the dressing room and the Countess lets her husband in. When there s a sudden noise from the dressing room, the Count skeptical of his wife s story that Susanna is in there.

Taking his wife with him, he leaves to get tools to force the door. Meanwhile, Susanna, who has re-entered the room unseen and observed everything, helps Cherubino escape through the window before taking his place in the dressing room. When the Count and Countess return, both are astonished to find Susanna in there. All seems well until the gardener, Antonio, appears, complaining that someone has jumped from the window, ruining his flowers. Figaro, who has rushed in to announce that everything is ready for the wedding, improvises quickly, feigning a limp and pretending that it was he who jumped. At that moment Bartolo, Marcellina, and Basilio arrive, putting their case to the Count and waving the contract that obliges Figaro to marry Marcellina. Delighted, the Count declares that Figaro and Susanna s wedding will be postponed.

Act III

Later in the day in the great hall, Susanna leads the Count on with promises of a rendezvous that night. He is overjoyed but then overhears Susanna conspiring with Figaro. In a rage, he declares he will have revenge.

The Countess, alone, recalls her past happiness. She s determined to go through with the conspiracy against her husband, and she and Susanna compose a letter to him confirming the rendezvous with Susanna that evening in the garden under the pine trees.

Marcellina, supported by a lawyer, Don Curzio, demands that Figaro pay his debt or marry her at once. Figaro replies that he can t without the consent of his parents for whom he s been searching for years, having been abducted as a baby. When he reveals a birthmark on his arm Marcellina realizes that he is her long-lost son, fathered by Bartolo. Seeing Figaro and Marcellina embrace, Susanna thinks her fianc? has betrayed her, but she is pacified when things are explained.

Cherubino, now dressed as a girl, appears with his girlfriend, Barbarina, the daughter of Antonio. Antonio, who has found Cherubino s cap in the garden, also arrives and unmasks the young man. The Count is furious to discover that Cherubino has disobeyed him and is still in the house. But his anger is punctured by Barbarina-who reveals that the Count, when he attempted to seduce her, promised her anything she wanted. What she wants now is to marry Cherubino. The Count is forced to agree. A march is heard and the household assembles for Figaro and Susanna s wedding. While dancing with the Count, Susanna hands him the letter, sealed with a pin.

Act IV

At night in the garden, Barbarina is in despair: she has lost the pin that the Count has asked her to take back to Susanna. When Figaro and Marcellina appear, Barbarina tells them about the planned rendezvous between the Count and Susanna. Thinking that his bride is unfaithful, Figaro rants against all women. He hides when Susanna and the Countess arrive, dressed in each other s clothes. Alone, Susanna sings of love. She knows that Figaro is listening and enjoys making him think that she s about to make love to the Count. Then she also conceals herself-in time to see Cherubino try to seduce the disguised Countess. The boy is chased away by the Count who wants to be alone with the woman he believes to be Susanna. Figaro, by now realizing what is going on, joins in the joke and declares his passion for Susanna in her Countess disguise. The Count returns. Finding Figaro with his wife, or so he thinks, he explodes with rage. At that moment, the real Countess steps forward and reveals her identity. Ashamed, the Count asks her pardon. After many moments of agonizing doubt, she forgives him and both couples are reunited.

Onegin (Ballet by John Cranko)

Onegin (Ballet by John Cranko)

To music by Pyotr Tchaikovsky
Ballet by John Cranko in three acts
Choreographer: John Cranko
Sets and Costumes: Jurgen Rose
Ballet Master: Reid Anderson
Lighting Designer: Steen Bjarke
Music Director: Pavel Sorokin
Assistants to Ballet Master: Agneta Valcu, Victor Valcu
Premiered at the Boldhoi Theatre on July 12, 2013.

SYNOPSIS

Act I
Scene 1

Madame Larina s Garden
Madame Larina, Olga and the nurse are finishing the party dresses and gossiping about Tatiana s upcoming birthday festivities. Madame Larina speculates on the future and reminisces about her own lost beauty and youth.
Lensky, a young poet engaged to Olga, arrives with a friend from St. Petersburg. He introduces Onegin, who, bored with the city, has come to see if the country can offer him any distraction. Tatiana, full of youthful and romantic fantasies, falls in love with the elegant stranger, so different from the country people she knows. Onegin, on the other hand, sees in Tatiana only a naive country girl who reads too many romantic novels.

Scene 2
Tatiana s Bedroom
Tatiana, her imagination aflame with impetuous first-love, dreams of Onegin and writes him a passionate love letter, which she gives to her nurse to deliver.

Act II
Scene 1
Tatiana s Birthday
The provincial gentry have come to celebrate Tatiana s birthday. They gossip about Lensky s infatuation with Olga and whisper prophecies of a dawning romance between Tatiana and the newcomer. Onegin finds the company boring. Stifling his yawns, he finds it difficult to be civil to them; furthermore he is irritated by Tatiana s letter which he regards merely as an outburst of adolescent love. In a quiet moment, he seeks out Tatiana and, telling her that he cannot love her, tears up the letter. Tatiana s distress, instead of awakening pity, merely increases his irritation.
Prince Gremin, a distant relation, appears. He is in love with Tatiana and Madame Larina hopes for a brilliant match but Tatiana, troubled with her own heart, hardly notices her kindly, older relation.
Onegin, in his boredom, decides to provoke Lensky by flirting with Olga who light-heartedly joins in his teasing. But Lensky takes the matter with passionate seriousness. He challenges Onegin to a duel.

Scene 2
The Duel
Tatiana and Olga try to reason with Lensky but his high romantic ideals are shattered by the betrayal of his friend and the fickleness of his beloved; he insists that the duel take place. Onegin kills his friend and for the first time his cold heart is moved by the horror of his deed. Tatiana realizes that her love was an illusion and that Onegin is self-centred and empty.

Act III
Scene 1
St. Petersburg
Onegin, having travelled the world for many years in an attempt to escape his own futility, returns to St. Petersburg where he is received at a ball in the palace of Prince Gremin. Gremin has recently married and Onegin is astonished to recognize in the stately and elegant young princess, Tatiana, the uninteresting little country girl whom he once turned away. The enormity of his mistake and loss engulfs him. His life now seems even more aimless and empty.

Scene 2
Tatiana s Boudoir
Tatiana reads a letter from Onegin, which reveals his love for her. Suddenly he stands before her, impatient to know her answer. Tatiana sorrowfully tells him that although she still feels her passionate girlhood love for him, she is now a woman and she could never find happiness with him or have respect for him. She orders him to leave her forever.

Romeo and Juliet (Ballet by Sergei Prokofiev)

Romeo and Juliet (Ballet by Sergei Prokofiev)

Ballet in three acts
Libretto by Adrian Piotrovsky, Sergei Radlov, Sergei Prokofiev after the tragedy of the same name by William Shakespeare
Choreography: Alexei Ratmansky
Set and Costume Design: Richard Hudson
Lightning Design: Jennifer Tipton
Conductor: Pavel Klinichev
Premiered on November 22, 2017
The world premiere of this version of the ballet took place in Toronto.

Synopsis

Act I
Scene 1

Morning in the Italian Renaissance city of Verona. Romeo, of the Montague family, greets the awakening day. As the city comes to life, Romeo is joined by two friends, Mercutio and Benvolio, and the market square is soon filled with people. The bitter enmity between the Montague and Capulet families emerges with the arrival of Tybalt, a Capulet. Innocuous teasing escalates into swordplay as Tybalt fights with Benvolio and Mercutio.
Lord and Lady Capulet and Lord and Lady Montague enter. There is a brief lull in the fighting but soon Capulet and Montague take up swords themselves. The Duke of Verona enters with his guards and intervenes, chastening all of the combatants. The crowd parts, revealing the bodies of two dead young men.

Scene 2
In her bedroom, Juliet, the daughter of Lord and Lady Capulet, plays affectionately with her Nurse as she prepares for a ball. Her mother enters and tells her of Paris, an aristocratic suitor, whom they expect Juliet to marry. Her father enters with Paris. Juliet is uncertain about the arrangement but she receives Paris graciously.

Scene 3
A lavish ball at the Capulet home. Juliet is being displayed by her father for the assembled guests. Disguised by masks, Romeo, Mercutio and Benvolio slip unannounced into the ball. When Romeo sees Juliet, he is immediately lovestruck. After Juliet dances with Paris, Romeo approaches her and professes his feelings. Juliet immediately falls in love. Tybalt, Juliet"s cousin, suspects the interloper and unmasks him, revealing his true identity. Enraged at Romeo"s effrontery, the hotheaded Tybalt demands revenge but he is stopped by Lord Capulet. As the guests depart, Tybalt warns Juliet to stay away from Romeo.

Scene 4
Later that night, Romeo waits beneath Juliet"s balcony. When she appears at her window he makes his presence known. Juliet comes down to him and, despite the danger of their situation which has now become all too clear to both, they pledge their love to each other.

Act II
Scene 1

In the market square, Romeo, delirious with love, is gently mocked by Mercutio and Benvolio. Juliet"s Nurse arrives, bearing a letter to Romeo from Juliet, agreeing to secretly marry him. Romeo is overjoyed.

Scene 2
As planned, Romeo and Juliet meet with Friar Laurence, who has offered to marry them despite the risk, in the hope that it might bring peace to the warring families. He performs the ceremony and the two young lovers are wed.

Scene 3
In the market square, Mercutio and Benvolio encounter Tybalt. Mercutio taunts Tybalt. Romeo enters. Tybalt challenges Romeo to a swordfight but Romeo refuses. Mercutio is less reluctant and, after an exchange of insults, he and Tybalt cross swords and fight. Romeo seeks to intervene and stop them but inadvertently abets Mercutio"s death. A griefstricken and guiltridden Romeo takes up a sword and fights Tybalt, killing him. Lord and Lady Capulet enter, distraught to find Tybalt dead. The Duke arrives and as his guards bear away the bodies of Tybalt and Mercutio, he angrily banishes Romeo, who flees.

Act III
Scene 1

Juliet"s bedroom at dawn. Romeo, although banished, has stayed for his wedding night with Juliet. But now, however sorrowfully, Romeo must depart, before they are discovered. After Romeo has gone, Juliet"s parents enter with Paris and tell her that she is to marry him the following day. Juliet protests but her father brutally silences her. In despair, Juliet rushes off to seek help from Friar Laurence.

Scene 2
In his cell, Friar Laurence gives Juliet a vial containing a sleeping draught that will simulate death. He will send word of the plan to Romeo, who will return to rescue her from the family vault when she has awakened.

Scene 3
Juliet returns to her bedroom, where she pretends to bow to her parents" will and marry Paris. Left alone, however, she takes the sleeping draught and falls into a death-like slumber on her bed. In the morning, Lord and Lady Capulet, Paris, the Nurse and several bridesmaids arrive to wake Juliet. The Nurse tries to rouse her but when she doesn"t respond, everyone believes she is dead.

Scene 4
In the Capulet vault, Juliet lies still in her death-like sleep. Romeo enters, but not having received Friar Laurence"s message, believes Juliet is really dead. In despair, he drinks a lethal poison to join her in death. Before he dies, though, he sees Juliet awaken and he realizes the cruel extent of what has happened. When Romeo is dead, Juliet takes his knife and kills herself. The Montagues and Lord Capulet, the Duke, Friar Laurence and others enter to discover the terrible scene. Realizing the part their enmity has played in the tragedy, the Capulets and Montague are reconciled in their sorrow.

The Taming of the Shrew (Ballet by Jean-Christophe Maillot)

The Taming of the Shrew (Ballet by Jean-Christophe Maillot)

Ballet in two acts.
to music by Dmitri Shostakovich.
Libretto by Jean Rouaud based on the play by William Shakespeare.
Choreographer: Jean-Christophe Maillot.
Assistant to Choreographer: Bernice Coppieters.
Set Designer: Ernest Pignon-Ernest.
Costume Designer: Augusten Maillot.
Assistant to Costume Designer: Jean-Michel Laine.
Lighting Designer: Dominique Drillot.
Music Director: Igor Dronov.
Premiered on July 4, 2014.

Dramatis Jean Rouaud:

ARGUMENT
Rather than a macho handbook, The Taming of the Shrew can be construed as an encounter between two forces of nature, who recognise one another at last. If they are abrupt, obnoxious, it stems from their solitude; they are fundamentally different from the society they live in, albatrosses among sparrows, and their excesses signal that they have yet to find a man (or a woman) who can measure up to them. Their love is out of the ordinary: while Petruchio could appear to be interested only in Baptista"s fortune, once the ink is dry on their marriage certificate, he doesn"t let go of Katharina. If he is interested, it"s by this woman; the real dowry, the actual gold mine, it"s her. He still needs to put her through a series of challenges to make sure that he wasn"t mistaken, that they are right for each other - measure for measure, so to speak. He was right. So was she. If she gives in to her husband"s demands, it"s not because she has found her master, but because she has met her match. Her submissiveness is an act. It hardly matters whether or not the sun is the moon, because the two of them have their own, extra-ordinary light. Petruchio isn"t fooled by by his wife"s new attitude. For the outside world, however, the prevalent social norms are safe. Everyone can breathe a sigh of relief: even the most reluctant among them have complied. In truth, Katharina and Petruchio play their parts in perfect harmony, and their singular tune sets them apart in what is a game of artifice.

THE CHARACTERS

Baptista is a rich gentleman who has two daughters: Katharina and Bianca. All would be well if the traditions of the time didn"t force him to marry his elder daughter first, when all the suitors queueing up at his door are interested solely in the agreeable Bianca. His daughters" happiness doesn"t matter much to him: what he really wants is to have sons-in-law. Based on Katharina"s behaviour, however, he despairs of it ever happening.
Katharina has a comfortable dowry which ought to attract potential husbands, but she is also endowed with an attitude that frightens them off. No one knows what her violence hides, but she despises her sister"s bland suitors. Nothing seems to be good enough for her. Is hers an acute case of misanthropy or a singularly demanding character? Unbridled, Katharina lives on the edge.
Bianca, Baptista"s younger daughter, is hostage to Katharina"s behaviour. As long as her sister keeps rejecting potential husbands, her many suitors will stay out of reach. The situation is cruel, because Bianca is as attractive as her sister is obnoxious. Hers are qualities that define the ideal woman in the society she lives in: fortune, grace, beauty and docility. Her sister will have none of it, however.
Gremio is an older gentleman, and could easily be one of the libidinous elders who spy on Susanna while she is bathing in the Book of Daniel. For him, the violent Katharina could never be Susanna, because she would have driven the voyeurs away ruthlessly. His Susanna is the chaste Bianca. Gremio"s appearance is off-putting, yet it doesn"t seem to hold him back as he attempts to woo her; he is living proof that money can distort one"s self-perception.
Hortensio, another one of Bianca"s suitors, is a dandy mainly concerned with himself and the rituals of high society. His interest is Bianca is mostly superficial, but he is the one who brings in his rude, boorish friend Petruchio, who may be able to solve the problem at hand.
Lucentio is a rich, idle youth. Well-bred and very charming, he could even fool people into believing he is well-read. He and Bianca come from the same world, they are the same age, and share the same yearning in love. As Juliette Greco once sang: "Let"s marry them, let"s marry them, I think they are very much alike".[1] Nobody would object to it - aside from Katharina.
Petruchio: There comes the monster - the one Hortensio believes to be able to accept, if not seduce, the monstrous Katharina as his wife. Hortensio thinks Petruchio will have low expectations; he is mistaken, and evidently doesn"t understand the man he calls his friend. Nobody comes close to this seemingly vulgar, shameless man, however, because he is the only one who will "see" Katharina. And he sees her as his equal, as unconcerned with etiquette and norms as himself. Monsters may be alone in their clairvoyance, after all.
Grumio, Petruccio"s servant, is cowardly and servile. That"s what"s expected of him. He may also be an accomplice to his master"s tricks and schemes.
The Widow is hardly disconsolate, and has no intention of remaining a widow. She sets her conditions, however: her second husband needs to belong to her world and to be rich. She can put up with the rest. She soon sets her sights on Hortensio.
The Housekeeper has been running the household for so long that she ought to be able to lay claim to Baptista, but he cares solely about his daughters. Since the house will soon be empty and her services no longer needed, she is wearily willing to accept Gremio"s advances. She may not love him, but it means she will be able to live comfortably and marry into the upper class, whose superiority is based on arrogance and money.

SYNOPSIS

Part I
In the spacious house of the wealthy Baptista, the servants are mocking the masters in their absence: they mimic Baptista, the father, who is struggling to marry his elder daughter - Katharina, a fury - and denying the suitors of the younger one - Bianca, a goody two-shoes - who are required to wait. Baptista returns unexpectedly, putting an abrupt end to the servants" comedy.
We meet his two daughters. The younger one, Bianca, who is the object of everyone"s attention, is as gracious as her sister Katharina is difficult and ill-tempered: nothing and no one seems to find grace in her eyes, except perhaps her father. She is the Shrew.
Attracted by Bianca"s beauty, the suitors show up at Baptista"s house. There are three of them: the libidinous Gremio, the conceited Hortensio and the charming Lucentio. They parade in front of Bianca and attempt to get her attention. Quite logically, Bianca prefers the charming Lucentio. Carried away by her budding feelings, she dances as if in a dream. Her father is intent on doing things according to custom. Daughters are to be married in the right order, starting with the eldest, and he won"t approve a proposal for Bianca as long as Katharina isn"t wed. Accordingly, he brings his elder daughter in and introduces her to the suitors in the hope that one of them will be interested in her, but Katharina is hardly encouraging. She does everything she can to repel them, and clearly prefers to stay alone with her father instead of giving in to the comedy of marriage.
Hence a pressing question for the suitors: how can they get rid of her? Hortensio suddenly remembers that he has a friend who is unlikely to be too demanding as long as the wedding brings a nice dowry, and who could help clear them by marrying Katharina. His name is Petruchio; he is as boorish as Katharina is ill-tempered, and the prospect of additional income should be enough for Katharina to appeal to him.
Their saviour arrives at last. Where is his fianc?e? She who seems to breathe fire? Right, he will make the best of it. Challenged to seduce Katharina, he pretends to woo her and takes every rebuff as encouragement to continue. The two monsters launch into a duel where Petruchio pretends to be impervious to Katharina"s attitude, while she actively tries to make herself even less attractive. At one point, however, when he kisses her, she slips into a daydream - perhaps love can be sweet after all? Lost in her thoughts, Katharina briefly lets herself go - and immediately denounces it as a meaningless moment of weakness. It"s too late, however: she has shown her sensitive side, and there is a glimmer of hope in her. Perhaps for that reason, she accepts the proposal of that strangely considerate boor, Petruchio.
Her decision opens the way for the suitors, who are finally allowed to woo the beautiful Bianca.
The first to go is Gremio. He brings a magnificent necklace as a gift for Bianca, but she isn"t interested; not even the finest jewellery could allure her where Gremio is concerned. The Housekeeper, who might soon be out of a position, is watching the scene. She sees an opportunity with Gremio and seizes it: since he doesn"t stand a chance with Bianca, she won"t let him escape.
Next up is Hortensio. He doesn"t need to bring a gift: his person is present enough. He is the gift. Bianca remains impervious to his self-assurance - he is fundamentally self-sufficient - In view of Bianca"s reticence and her lack of susceptibility to his complacency - and this time a widow, a friend of the family yearning to be back in the game, sets her sights on Hortensio.
Lucentio is last. From an affluent family, he is a worthy suitor in the eyes of Baptista, and all boyish charm in Bianca"s. As a token of his love, he presents her with a collection of poems. If all goes well, theirs will be the next wedding.
All is not well for Katharina, however, as she waits for the arrival of her fianc?, torn between rage, melancholy and despair. The wedding celebrations have started. Baptista attempts to help his elder daughter cope with her groom"s defection while the rest of the party is having fun. Grumio makes an appearance at last, and launches into an act that bodes well for his master"s offhandedness. It becomes clear that his master has more urgent matters to attend to than his wedding; he will come when he feels like it, and has drunk to his heart"s content.
When he appears at last, instead of going straight to his bride, he makes her wait yet again, and is clearly in no hurry to get married. Since that"s what he"s there for, he finally deigns to address his future wife. As everyone waits to see what gift he has brought for Katharina, he snatches the necklace meant for Bianca and puts it around Katharina"s neck. The humiliation is too cruel for the Shrew, who slaps Petruchio.
The assembly freezes in astonishment. The foolish, rebellious bride has spoiled the festivities. The vexed groom raises his hand to her, and seems on the verge on beating her. The party is over. Men like him, willing to take on such a virago, are few and far between.
Petruchio considers slapping her back and leaving on the spot, but changes his mind. This woman, he thinks to himself, this woman and her temper could have been made like me, for me. But she will need to learn a few things - first, that no one treats me like this. He drags her like a rag doll and leaves with her as the guests look on, aghast, and wonder if they haven"t pushed it a little far. It"s looking bad for the Shrew. Still, it"s over and done with. Let"s dance.

Part II
A strange honeymoon begins that takes the newlyweds to Petruchio"s house through a menacing forest. a trip that will take the newly-wed couple, through an uncanny forest, to Petruchio"s home. The exhausted Katharina can barely stand up and begs for mercy; she struggles, yearns to stop and rest, but her husband is adamant that he will leave her in the middle of nowhere if she doesn"t keep up. Katharina, who knows only the comfort of her father"s home, is so scared tha she stands up, but soon implores him again. Her husband doesn"t yield. At that point the little group (inevitably, the couple is accompanied by Grumio, who has just disappeared) is attacked by bandits, who brutalise Katharina and steal her necklace. Petruchio remains impervious to his wife"s cries for help. He seems to believe she can fend off for herself, or that it"s as good an opportunity as another to test her. He finally intervenes and scares off the attackers, among whom we see Grumio, who takes off his mask. A servant scheming is hardly surprising, but could his master be an accomplice? Did he stage the attack to put Katharina further on edge? Nothing confirms it yet.
They finally make it to Petruchio"s abode, which is far less opulent than Baptista"s. Katharina, alone, exhausted, fully aware of what life holds for her now, gives in to despair, and ultimately faints. Petruchio, who was watching her, rushes to her side and carries her tenderly to the bed; marvelling at her courage, her austere beauty, he lets his affection and desire show as she sleeps. When she regains consciousness, he promptly goes to sit on a bench and starts to act curiously. His house may not be very comfortable or its master very rich, but why is he warming himself at an imaginary fire? Intrigued, Katherina gets up and comes closer; when she sees that there is no fireplace, she wonders if her husband is mad. Then she understands that it is a game. Alright, there is a fireplace. She blows on the embers to rekindle the flames. The she offers imaginary tea to her husband. As the game continues, they discover each other. Their public masks come off. The war ends. Bewilderment of love.
In the morning, as the sun invades their bedroom, the lovers wake up peacefully, for the first time in their lives. They barely have time to enjoy the moment: Grumio brings a letter, an invitation to go back to Baptista"s house for Bianca and Lucentio"s wedding. The opportunity for Petruchio to show everyone the new Katharina.
Before they leave, Grumio returns the stolen necklace to his mistress. Petruchio acts surprised and lectures his servant. Is it just an act? Katharine grows suspicious and loses her temper again. Petruchio pretends to be offended, which leads to another confrontation - and reconciliation.
At Baptista"s, preparations are underway for the wedding of Bianca and Lucentio. Hortensio and the Widow, Gremio and the Housekeeper take the opportunity to make their relationships public. Everyone remembers the exit of the Shrew with her husband, and awaits them with curiosity.
Hence their surprise when Petruchio and Katharina show up elegantly dressed, affable, Petruchio almost friendly, Katharina seemingly submissive. The party rejoices and concludes they are an excellent influence on each other. They look every inch the well-heeled couple, and as a result, are invited to the tea ceremony.
Things soon go wrong, however. Whereas Bianca, the Widow and the Housekeeper show themselves to be meek, obedient wifes, Katharina stands up, snatches the teapot from her sister"s hands and shows her that she has no reason to behave so submissively with her husband, pouring the tea on Lucentio"s knees. Katharina then lectures the Widow, who seems to enjoy the lesson and suggests Gremio serve her. Petruchio, evidently pleased, watches his wife sow discord among the couples and teach the other women the art of rebellion. Once they have wreaked havoc in the house, the lovers depart, juggling squabbles and demonstrations of affection, leaving the guests appalled, and the women melancholy.

The Young Person s Guide to the Orchestra. Le carnaval des animaux

The Young Person s Guide to the Orchestra. Le carnaval des animaux

Camille Saint-Saens. Benjamin Britten
Music Director: Anton Grishanin
Director: Alexei Frandetti
Premiered on September 24, 2017

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